2

votes

Whole/heavy cream in Europe

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created March 30, 2010 at 2:54 PM

Hello again :)

I'm from Europe and have a hard time finding "whole/heavy cream".

I'm wondering if "smetana" (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Smetana_(dairy_product)) is heavy/whole cream ?

On the label of "smetana" it says:

Sweet* cream

Sweet cream with 35% of milk fat, pasteurised at high temperature** Safe to use until the date above (short shelf life)

or in Italian Panna con 35% di grass, pastorizzat a temperature elevatar

1407 kJ/335kCal Protein: 2,0 Carbs: 3,0 Fat: 35,0

No added sugar though. The name is used to describe the taste * I believe it's 85 Celsius (185 F) for 5 - 15 seconds

We also have whipping cream but that's sterilized (higher temperature) and can contain various E's to prolong the shelf life.

Any idea if this is it ?

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on February 17, 2011
at 11:43 PM

where are you from, what yould you pay for it?

84666a86108dee8d11cbbc85b6382083

(2399)

on February 17, 2011
at 10:18 AM

None for me then :D

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on February 16, 2011
at 12:07 PM

its 3euro 0.5liter

7e1064164e012a1ead098098245b1cd4

(1217)

on February 15, 2011
at 10:06 AM

@patrick3000 - water.

84666a86108dee8d11cbbc85b6382083

(2399)

on February 15, 2011
at 10:00 AM

oak0y indeed. I'm seeing more and more UHT (Ultra high temperature) creams and those who include carrageen. How much does a demeter cream cost per volume ?

88905cfc5bb098ad3830671a1af373a8

(803)

on October 12, 2010
at 07:38 PM

if it's low in carb and protein also, then what makes up the rest of it, the 65-70%?

84666a86108dee8d11cbbc85b6382083

(2399)

on October 11, 2010
at 04:40 PM

I presume because it only has 30-35% of fat, while butter has about 83% and coconut 100% or so.

84666a86108dee8d11cbbc85b6382083

(2399)

on October 11, 2010
at 04:39 PM

I presume because it only has 30-35% of fat.

D15d6820ef1545edac65e975cc2d8949

on April 01, 2010
at 07:21 AM

@Ri Vassigo. :-) @lkco Well, there will always be cultural differences. Even though people in the US tend to think of European countries = ~ states.

70d9359a2086e890a4c3bccb2ba8a8cb

(2254)

on April 01, 2010
at 06:34 AM

As good a fat source as non-cultured heavy cream :) Sugar is actually likely to be lower that in uncultured heavy cream, since it has been used up by the fermenting bacteria and converted to lactic acid (which gives the sour taste). Casein.... not sure, probably same level as in uncultured cream (i.e. very low, since it's mostly fat).

70d9359a2086e890a4c3bccb2ba8a8cb

(2254)

on April 01, 2010
at 06:32 AM

Smetana and creme fraiche are cultured creams, but they are made from heavy cream too, the only difference being that they contain live bacteria and have a more tangy/sour taste (like the cream equivalent of yoghurt). So I would count them as types of heavy cream also.

1e68c6909db3ce6c272a7a0bf2c2978b

(320)

on March 31, 2010
at 09:54 AM

Double cream in the UK is a higher percentage fat than whipping cream. Clotted cream is even higher (about 63% fat).

1e68c6909db3ce6c272a7a0bf2c2978b

(320)

on March 31, 2010
at 09:52 AM

This will again be different in each country. UK for example has very loose rulings (much looser than for milk) on pasteurisation of cream - not that you'll be able to find it in supermarkets, but there is no restriction on its sale.

Medium avatar

(7073)

on March 30, 2010
at 08:59 PM

I believe all cream one finds in the supermarkets in Europe is pasteurized. If you want unpasteurized cream then it is best to skim it off the top of whole raw milk.

84666a86108dee8d11cbbc85b6382083

(2399)

on March 30, 2010
at 05:57 PM

Heavy cream isn't pasteurized ?

84666a86108dee8d11cbbc85b6382083

(2399)

on March 30, 2010
at 05:56 PM

EU is planning on that :)

84666a86108dee8d11cbbc85b6382083

(2399)

on March 30, 2010
at 05:51 PM

Croatia, the Balkans.

Medium avatar

(7073)

on March 30, 2010
at 03:49 PM

Which country are you from?

78b9161a401f16b9611fe4e639b0b856

(200)

on March 30, 2010
at 03:17 PM

Thanks - you saved me from having to write both parts of that post out. ;)

  • 84666a86108dee8d11cbbc85b6382083

    asked by

    (2399)
  • Views
    8.6K
  • Last Activity
    1409D AGO
Frontpage book

Get FREE instant access to our Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!

9 Answers

4
D15d6820ef1545edac65e975cc2d8949

on March 30, 2010
at 03:16 PM

Europe isn't a single country, you know...

E.g. Sweden has vispgr??dde (literally: whipping cream) at 38-40% fat.

D15d6820ef1545edac65e975cc2d8949

on April 01, 2010
at 07:21 AM

@Ri Vassigo. :-) @lkco Well, there will always be cultural differences. Even though people in the US tend to think of European countries = ~ states.

84666a86108dee8d11cbbc85b6382083

(2399)

on March 30, 2010
at 05:56 PM

EU is planning on that :)

78b9161a401f16b9611fe4e639b0b856

(200)

on March 30, 2010
at 03:17 PM

Thanks - you saved me from having to write both parts of that post out. ;)

1
8254c4e4d1f2aedd09cb9608b8777654

on August 25, 2010
at 05:20 PM

Smetana is the Russian word for sour cream and that's what I would expect the product to be if I was buying it.

1
721e0e48ae0a51afd193cb91c2ed298f

on May 06, 2010
at 04:46 PM

I don't know where you live right now, my husband is also from Croatia and we live in the States, I have been having a hard time cooking with American heavy cream, is much more liquid than European, but I learned from Julia Child's book that you can make European style heavy cream by mixing 1 cup of heavy cream and 1 tea spoon of buttermilk, heat it at no more than 85 degrees (farenheit ) and put it in a loosely covered jar at room temperature and making sure it doesn't go below 60 degrees (again farenheit) it will take between 5-8 hours to thickened on a hot day, but it works!

1
84666a86108dee8d11cbbc85b6382083

(2399)

on March 30, 2010
at 06:05 PM

Well basically what I'm asking is if smetana is a good fat source and if sugar and casein are also as low as in whole/heavy cream products ?

70d9359a2086e890a4c3bccb2ba8a8cb

(2254)

on April 01, 2010
at 06:34 AM

As good a fat source as non-cultured heavy cream :) Sugar is actually likely to be lower that in uncultured heavy cream, since it has been used up by the fermenting bacteria and converted to lactic acid (which gives the sour taste). Casein.... not sure, probably same level as in uncultured cream (i.e. very low, since it's mostly fat).

1
Medium avatar

(7073)

on March 30, 2010
at 03:57 PM

Wherever you go in Europe, unless you buy direct from source (i.e. the dairy) I believe cream has to be pasteurized by law. So, depending on what you mean by whole/heavy cream, if you can find raw whole milk, the best thing to do is skim the cream from the top yourself and whip it so it thickens.

Most European countries nowadays stock creme fraiche in larger supermarkets; this is ultra thick cream and has a slightly soured taste, as it is cultured. If you buy it from the supermarket it will be almost solid, as it has taken time to travel to the shop. If you buy it direct from a dairy it will be the thickness of thin pouring cream, but will thicken to almost solid within a week (kept in the fridge).

Medium avatar

(7073)

on March 30, 2010
at 08:59 PM

I believe all cream one finds in the supermarkets in Europe is pasteurized. If you want unpasteurized cream then it is best to skim it off the top of whole raw milk.

1e68c6909db3ce6c272a7a0bf2c2978b

(320)

on March 31, 2010
at 09:52 AM

This will again be different in each country. UK for example has very loose rulings (much looser than for milk) on pasteurisation of cream - not that you'll be able to find it in supermarkets, but there is no restriction on its sale.

84666a86108dee8d11cbbc85b6382083

(2399)

on March 30, 2010
at 05:57 PM

Heavy cream isn't pasteurized ?

1
Be4b60059db3511771303de1613ecb67

(1137)

on March 30, 2010
at 03:07 PM

Whipping cream is heavy cream, as is Double Devon cream in the UK. Smetana is cultured cream, similar to cream fraiche or clotted cream. Perhaps you can find a dairy farm and see if they have any true heavy cream.

70d9359a2086e890a4c3bccb2ba8a8cb

(2254)

on April 01, 2010
at 06:32 AM

Smetana and creme fraiche are cultured creams, but they are made from heavy cream too, the only difference being that they contain live bacteria and have a more tangy/sour taste (like the cream equivalent of yoghurt). So I would count them as types of heavy cream also.

1e68c6909db3ce6c272a7a0bf2c2978b

(320)

on March 31, 2010
at 09:54 AM

Double cream in the UK is a higher percentage fat than whipping cream. Clotted cream is even higher (about 63% fat).

0
84666a86108dee8d11cbbc85b6382083

(2399)

on February 15, 2011
at 09:59 AM

Deletion candidate.

0
77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on February 14, 2011
at 03:44 PM

cream have to be pasturizd by law. i found out the best cream in shops are organic demeter cream. bio dynamic steinar organic.

They keep the cows pastured, the diary as fresh and natural as possible and its only pasturized.

Some cream is longer heated. And also homogenizied.

The best cream i found was biodynamic organic demter cream.

84666a86108dee8d11cbbc85b6382083

(2399)

on February 15, 2011
at 10:00 AM

oak0y indeed. I'm seeing more and more UHT (Ultra high temperature) creams and those who include carrageen. How much does a demeter cream cost per volume ?

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on February 16, 2011
at 12:07 PM

its 3euro 0.5liter

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on February 17, 2011
at 11:43 PM

where are you from, what yould you pay for it?

84666a86108dee8d11cbbc85b6382083

(2399)

on February 17, 2011
at 10:18 AM

None for me then :D

0
Ac9425a387b78cb37a01972fe848bddb

(655)

on October 11, 2010
at 03:37 PM

If heavy cream is saturated, why is it that it doesn't harden when chilled like butter or coconut oil?

84666a86108dee8d11cbbc85b6382083

(2399)

on October 11, 2010
at 04:39 PM

I presume because it only has 30-35% of fat.

88905cfc5bb098ad3830671a1af373a8

(803)

on October 12, 2010
at 07:38 PM

if it's low in carb and protein also, then what makes up the rest of it, the 65-70%?

84666a86108dee8d11cbbc85b6382083

(2399)

on October 11, 2010
at 04:40 PM

I presume because it only has 30-35% of fat, while butter has about 83% and coconut 100% or so.

7e1064164e012a1ead098098245b1cd4

(1217)

on February 15, 2011
at 10:06 AM

@patrick3000 - water.

Answer Question


Get FREE instant access to our
Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!