1

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Cream (in New Zealand)

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created April 15, 2011 at 11:17 AM

So I haven't been able to find whipping cream or heavy cream; all I find is "cream". Fresh pasteurised cream.

ingredients: Pasteurised cream (40% milk fat).

Where does this fit into the American-styled heavy cream?

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on May 09, 2011
at 11:45 PM

Holy hell, just about the most definitive I've seen thnx!

E3267155f6962f293583fc6a0b98793e

(1085)

on April 16, 2011
at 10:22 PM

I stand corrected. I was referring to the whipping cream I can find in Wichita, KS.

84666a86108dee8d11cbbc85b6382083

(2399)

on April 16, 2011
at 11:40 AM

Buy, drunk, enjoy.

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5 Answers

best answer

1
E3267155f6962f293583fc6a0b98793e

(1085)

on April 15, 2011
at 11:38 AM

It is probably better than any American Heavy Whipping Cream as it all has additives ie. carrageenan, guar gum.... yuck. American heavy whipping cream is only 33% fat. I see NZ is 40% fat. The processors in American take some of the fat out add milk and thickeners.

best answer

8
Aead76beb5fc7b762a6b4ddc234f6051

(15239)

on April 15, 2011
at 07:29 PM

actually:

approx 18% butter fat:
Australia & NZ: light cream
Nth America: single cream, light cream, table cream
UK & Ireland: single cream, light cream

approx 18% butter fat + strong bacterial cultures:
Australia & NZ: sour cream
Nth America: sour cream
UK & Ireland: sour cream

approx 35% butter fat:
Australia & NZ: pure cream, pouring cream
Nth America: whipping cream
UK & Ireland: whipping cream

approx 35% butter fat + thickening agents:
(Thickening agents can be gelatine or vegetable gums)
Australia & NZ: thickened cream
Nth America: whipping cream
UK & Ireland: whipping cream

approx 35% butter fat + mild bacterial cultures:
Australia & NZ: creme fraiche
Nth America: creme fraiche
UK & Ireland: creme fraiche

approx 48% butter fat:
Australia & NZ: double cream
Nth America: not commonly found, may be called extra heavy whipping cream
UK & Ireland: double cream

heat treated with approx 55% butter fat:
Australia & NZ: clotted cream, scalded cream
Nth America: clotted cream
UK & Ireland: clotted cream, devon cream

from my favorite aussie blogger, jules clancy at stone soup.

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on May 09, 2011
at 11:45 PM

Holy hell, just about the most definitive I've seen thnx!

1
183f5c49a7a9548b6f5238d1f33cb35e

on April 15, 2011
at 10:15 PM

I just buy the Anchor/home brand/pams/meadowfresh "fresh cream", which can be found next to the milks, in 300ml ~ 1l plastic bottles. For example the one I currently have is Pam's Fresh cream, only ingredient is pasteurised cream, 40% milk fat.

New world once had a brand of organic cream, but it was only one time and they haven't restocked it since :(

0
Af1d286f0fd5c3949f59b4edf4d892f5

(18452)

on April 15, 2011
at 02:26 PM

Actually Deb is not 100% correct --> sorry Deb :(

The 'cream' you are seeing is the same thing essentially. I use Clover Organic Farms cream most often. They have it labeled as "Heavy Whipping Cream". The only ingredient is Pasteurized organic cream, just like yours in NZ. On their site, it says 40% butterfat, also just like yours.

http://www.cloverorganicfarms.com/Products_Organic_Heavy_Whipping_Cream.asp

So they are one in the same. It's cream. Drink, eat, and be merry.

E3267155f6962f293583fc6a0b98793e

(1085)

on April 16, 2011
at 10:22 PM

I stand corrected. I was referring to the whipping cream I can find in Wichita, KS.

0
9d741bcbe702044635f2ce3078043054

(1435)

on April 15, 2011
at 01:10 PM

My American Heavy Cream has 100% of its calories from fat (50 Cals/serving, 50 cals from fat). A serving is 15ml, which I presume weighs slightly less than 15g. Thus the by-weight ratio is a little north of 33% fat. The rest must be mostly water, because there are no carbs at all.

They list cream and skim milk as ingredients, but the amount of skim must be small enough that it does not contribute a significant amount of milk sugar.

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