3

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Are high Lectin foods addictive?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created April 24, 2011 at 10:22 PM

(just hear me out, huntgatherlove) I'm pretty sensitive to high Lectin foods (nuts, dairy, white potato, too many eggs...) and generally avoid them as they make me bloated and puffy and constipated. BUT, when I do eat them, I find myself craving these foods for days afterwards! Even if I ate just one if these foods, I'll crave ALL high Lectin foods- it's like they fill me in a different sort of way. It becomes quite a challenge to refrain, and it seems similar to those who deal with non-paleo food cravings- a lot of willpower mixed with guilt...

Does anybody else respond like this?

26b0f1261d1a0d916825bd0deeb96a21

(5798)

on March 23, 2012
at 12:48 AM

What if an animal that eats seeds is aiding the seed by eliminating the seed, undigested, in fecal matter in a new area of the environment, so that the seed can grow? Does that happen?

Be1dbd31e4a3fccd4394494aa5db256d

(17969)

on January 07, 2012
at 06:16 PM

You're right it could be a product of chaos, now 9 months or so later I probably wouldn't assume that. It was supposed to be phrased more as a hypothesis anyway. And I did provide a plausible reason why it might be that way, perhaps one week's worth of very bad experiences with wheat is more powerful a deterrent than a lifetime's worth of small and benign experiences, and results in less seeds being eaten. Who knows, I was just guessing.

80da9f79e2d79978130925702d4c6092

(105)

on January 07, 2012
at 12:55 PM

You're applying "just so stories" to evolution here. There is no reason to believe that wheat contains these peptides just to act on animals that happen to eat them. They could serve some other purpose...and probably do, since everything else in the wheat's packaging is meant to deter eating and digestion.

B85a65f644cb1d07df650c429facdab8

(105)

on April 28, 2011
at 02:54 AM

Then that may do it! Thanks for the info :)

Bd271299b2d4d9b2e3da9c252fef058c

(2854)

on April 25, 2011
at 11:21 AM

So true.. it is so difficult to control portion sizes when these foods are so abundant! Anybody have a method?

Bd271299b2d4d9b2e3da9c252fef058c

(2854)

on April 25, 2011
at 11:18 AM

Gluten is a high lectin food, as well!

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4 Answers

2
Cab7e4ef73c5d7d7a77e1c3d7f5773a1

(7304)

on April 25, 2011
at 12:15 AM

It doesn't seem like high lectin foods per se, but rather pseudo paleo foods. How many eggs and nuts would we really have gotten in the wild? Probably very few. And potatoes and dairy aren't strictly paleo (not that they're bad foods).

Bd271299b2d4d9b2e3da9c252fef058c

(2854)

on April 25, 2011
at 11:21 AM

So true.. it is so difficult to control portion sizes when these foods are so abundant! Anybody have a method?

1
B1fcaceba952861d0324bdb291edbbe0

(3159)

on April 25, 2011
at 12:32 AM

Well, it might not be the lectins that cause the cravings - perhaps it's other components that lead to the cravings that are shared by all these food items? Lectins just happen to be a shared variable ...

1
Be1dbd31e4a3fccd4394494aa5db256d

(17969)

on April 25, 2011
at 12:21 AM

Some most definitely are addictive in the literal biological sense. Various peptides in wheat called exorphins trigger dopamine receptors and other pleasure mechanisms in subtle ways. http://evolutionarypsychiatry.blogspot.com/2010/12/pleasure-pain-wheat-and-psychopharm.html

I wonder why it would be adaptive to addict an animal that eats a seed. I mean the fact that seeds poison animals should tell us that they don't want to be eaten. Maybe it's more effective to sacrifice a bunch of seeds to kill or seriously maim an animal imminently rather than have it munch little bits here and there for a long time.

80da9f79e2d79978130925702d4c6092

(105)

on January 07, 2012
at 12:55 PM

You're applying "just so stories" to evolution here. There is no reason to believe that wheat contains these peptides just to act on animals that happen to eat them. They could serve some other purpose...and probably do, since everything else in the wheat's packaging is meant to deter eating and digestion.

Be1dbd31e4a3fccd4394494aa5db256d

(17969)

on January 07, 2012
at 06:16 PM

You're right it could be a product of chaos, now 9 months or so later I probably wouldn't assume that. It was supposed to be phrased more as a hypothesis anyway. And I did provide a plausible reason why it might be that way, perhaps one week's worth of very bad experiences with wheat is more powerful a deterrent than a lifetime's worth of small and benign experiences, and results in less seeds being eaten. Who knows, I was just guessing.

26b0f1261d1a0d916825bd0deeb96a21

(5798)

on March 23, 2012
at 12:48 AM

What if an animal that eats seeds is aiding the seed by eliminating the seed, undigested, in fecal matter in a new area of the environment, so that the seed can grow? Does that happen?

1
B85a65f644cb1d07df650c429facdab8

(105)

on April 24, 2011
at 11:31 PM

Oddly, I have a similar story but with a different culprit! I get the same thing when I consume gluten (which I'm very sensitive to). I've always sort of attributed it to some wonkiness in my system, but if someone has some input, I'd be interested as well!

Bd271299b2d4d9b2e3da9c252fef058c

(2854)

on April 25, 2011
at 11:18 AM

Gluten is a high lectin food, as well!

B85a65f644cb1d07df650c429facdab8

(105)

on April 28, 2011
at 02:54 AM

Then that may do it! Thanks for the info :)

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