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Running and strength training recovery

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created June 13, 2012 at 6:01 PM

I do body weight exercise 2 or 3 times a week and plan to start running. I was almost sedentary until a few months ago.

Would running interfere with strength training recovery? The couch to 5k involves recovery time from running, usually a run every couple of days. Would it be better to scale back and just run once or twice a week to avoid too much cortisol? Or would it take forever to see endurance gains running infrequently?

I eat roughly according to the PHD, am about 20lb overweight and male, and have a boatload of job stress which I think running may help. Thanks!

My gift to you is a motivational grandma video. http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-18346128

E4f858a9178422502c42b9719690e52c

(603)

on June 14, 2012
at 08:17 AM

I'll take your advice, much appreciated.

E4f858a9178422502c42b9719690e52c

(603)

on June 14, 2012
at 08:16 AM

Thanks. No way I'm paying a gym to run!

Bf57bcbdc19d4f1728599053acd020ab

(5043)

on June 13, 2012
at 06:53 PM

The amount of running you do to train for a 5k is not in this category. Even Kurt Harris likes to go for the occasional run, as he freely admits.

Ae8946707ddebf0f0bfbcfc63276d823

(9402)

on June 13, 2012
at 06:35 PM

...especially if you are getting enough nutrition and rest

Ae8946707ddebf0f0bfbcfc63276d823

(9402)

on June 13, 2012
at 06:35 PM

From personal experience, I've found if I try to do squats right after running, I don't squat as well. My advice is listen to your body. If your legs are still sore from running, then maybe you have to weight another day on the squats. Others might say just work through the soreness as long as it's not a real injury, but my bias would be towards lifting at max intensity at every session which means being as recovered as possible before you start. If you lift 2-3 times a week and run 2-3 times a week, it seems like you should be able to make a schedule that allows for recovery time...

E4f858a9178422502c42b9719690e52c

(603)

on June 13, 2012
at 06:26 PM

Thanks. Do you reckon in terms of recovery the more cardio running wouldn't overlap with strength training?

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4 Answers

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1
F0a3e3f17d9a740810ac37ff2353a9f3

(3804)

on June 13, 2012
at 06:26 PM

Any exercise at or above moderate-intensity can prolong recovery.

If stress reduction is your primary goal, alternate strength and endurance workouts every other day, skipping weekends. One week you'll have two strength and one endurance sessions, the following week two endurance and one strength, and so on. Limit both strength and endurance sessions to 20 minutes each. That schedule should provide improvements in strength and endurance, with plenty of time for recovery. (High-intensity interval training is much more efficient at improving cardiovascular fitness than steady-state exercise, and it improves anaerobic fitness, as well, but steady-state exercise is generally a better stress reducer and mood elevator.)

E4f858a9178422502c42b9719690e52c

(603)

on June 14, 2012
at 08:17 AM

I'll take your advice, much appreciated.

1
Bf57bcbdc19d4f1728599053acd020ab

(5043)

on June 13, 2012
at 06:54 PM

Running is a good stress-reducer. I personally find a long slow run an ideal way to unwind or relax, get my mind off stressful things and just enjoy being outside and moving. It helps fuel my creative engine, too. To each his/her own, I suppose.

If I were you I'd ease into the running with some run/walk combinations to see how it works for you. Deifnitely do it outside and not on a gym treadmill, for the "being in nature" factor which is also a good de-stresser.

E4f858a9178422502c42b9719690e52c

(603)

on June 14, 2012
at 08:16 AM

Thanks. No way I'm paying a gym to run!

1
Ae8946707ddebf0f0bfbcfc63276d823

(9402)

on June 13, 2012
at 06:20 PM

Eric's excellent post on how to lose weight says if you limit intense workouts to 45 minutes, cortisol shouldn't be a problem:

http://paleohacks.com/questions/46722/how-do-i-lose-weight/46780#46780

This likely varies from individual to individual, but maybe a good starting point or rule of thumb. I'm guessing it's unlikely your 5k will take longer than 45 minutes.

E4f858a9178422502c42b9719690e52c

(603)

on June 13, 2012
at 06:26 PM

Thanks. Do you reckon in terms of recovery the more cardio running wouldn't overlap with strength training?

Ae8946707ddebf0f0bfbcfc63276d823

(9402)

on June 13, 2012
at 06:35 PM

From personal experience, I've found if I try to do squats right after running, I don't squat as well. My advice is listen to your body. If your legs are still sore from running, then maybe you have to weight another day on the squats. Others might say just work through the soreness as long as it's not a real injury, but my bias would be towards lifting at max intensity at every session which means being as recovered as possible before you start. If you lift 2-3 times a week and run 2-3 times a week, it seems like you should be able to make a schedule that allows for recovery time...

Ae8946707ddebf0f0bfbcfc63276d823

(9402)

on June 13, 2012
at 06:35 PM

...especially if you are getting enough nutrition and rest

0
Bf57bcbdc19d4f1728599053acd020ab

(5043)

on June 13, 2012
at 06:53 PM

The amount of running you do to train for a 5k is not in this category. Even Kurt Harris likes to go for the occasional run, as he freely admits.

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