2

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Increased heart rate = high cortisol levels?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created January 02, 2011 at 1:01 PM

The past few nights my heart starts to beat pretty hard compared to the rest of the day. I'm concerned my cortisol levels are increasing? I have been under some stress the past week and there has been a couple sleepless nights. Any suggestions?

E91fd339d760ed76cc72570a679ebf5a

(2369)

on January 02, 2011
at 10:36 PM

Everything I've read about IF and adrenals suggests that going for long periods without eating taxes the adrenals because they have to compensate by raising catecholamines, etc. Anecdotally, a harder, not necessarily faster (though that came later), pounding heart was the first symptom of my adrenals burning out.

22212e9ba2a041e6da6c963d4d41615a

(5773)

on January 02, 2011
at 05:22 PM

more harder than faster..

66e6b190e62fb3bcf42d4c60801c7bf6

(12407)

on January 02, 2011
at 04:47 PM

How does IF put stress on the adrenals? I do the leangains approach and fast for 24 hours once a week and my resting HR stays around 49-51 bpm. I was always under the impression that IF gives adrenals a rest.

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3 Answers

1
5edbf85deaf83e13b176df023abb154d

on February 01, 2011
at 01:38 PM

Not only can a very low pulse lead to poor oxygenation and glucose flow dynamics (long intervals between flows), the slightest interruption can cause you to faint (your brain defends its supply by putting you in a horizontal plane). Our former president George Bush had a pulse of 42, like you. He choked on a chip and fainted while watching a football game with Condi Rice and staff. The brief interruption from choking was enough to compromise the flow of oxygen and glucose to his brain, causing him to faint. This is just a conspicuous example, but it is not uncommon.

Drop the cycling and aerobics. A bit of sprinting and weight lifting. My pulse is around 68 to 72.

0
667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on January 02, 2011
at 10:06 PM

I too feel a faster and maybe harder heartbeat while laying in bed trying to go to sleep. This seems to only happen after a sugary dessert though. Actually even low sugar very dark chocolate does it too. I'd say ditch any sugar at all within at least a couple hours of bed time.

0
E91fd339d760ed76cc72570a679ebf5a

(2369)

on January 02, 2011
at 03:32 PM

Is it beating harder or faster or both? It's possible it's your adrenals. Don't stress them unnecessarily (avoid caffeine, alcohol, sugar, intermittent fasting, extended low-carb, intense exercise, emotional distress, scary movies, etc.).

66e6b190e62fb3bcf42d4c60801c7bf6

(12407)

on January 02, 2011
at 04:47 PM

How does IF put stress on the adrenals? I do the leangains approach and fast for 24 hours once a week and my resting HR stays around 49-51 bpm. I was always under the impression that IF gives adrenals a rest.

E91fd339d760ed76cc72570a679ebf5a

(2369)

on January 02, 2011
at 10:36 PM

Everything I've read about IF and adrenals suggests that going for long periods without eating taxes the adrenals because they have to compensate by raising catecholamines, etc. Anecdotally, a harder, not necessarily faster (though that came later), pounding heart was the first symptom of my adrenals burning out.

22212e9ba2a041e6da6c963d4d41615a

(5773)

on January 02, 2011
at 05:22 PM

more harder than faster..

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