2

votes

How can cortisol levels be governed?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created April 06, 2013 at 1:28 AM

In one Paleo book, the author describes a Paleo trait of having high cortisol levels upon getting up in the morning which drop down to when it is bedtime, and a modern picture of low cortisol levels in the morning, usually boosted by stimulants, and rising cortisol until sleep aids are often used to damp a second wind.

What governs this difference? How should a person act etc. to have the Paleo pattern of high cortisol levels getting up and low cortisol levels come bedtime and restful sleep??

A2c38be4c54c91a15071f82f14cac0b3

(12682)

on April 13, 2013
at 10:49 PM

In a glycogen depleted low carber or athlete I don't doubt getting some glucose lowers cortisol, but for your average person is there much of a difference between noming on fat vs. carbs on cortisol? I'm not so sure.

Frontpage book

Get FREE instant access to our Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!

4 Answers

1
1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

on April 13, 2013
at 05:02 PM

Circadian cortisol levels peak in the morning, then proceed to fall, with a small. spike mid afternoon and then fall again.

Carbohydrates are the only macro nutrient that actually reduce cortisol levels upon consumption.

Take a hint.

A2c38be4c54c91a15071f82f14cac0b3

(12682)

on April 13, 2013
at 10:49 PM

In a glycogen depleted low carber or athlete I don't doubt getting some glucose lowers cortisol, but for your average person is there much of a difference between noming on fat vs. carbs on cortisol? I'm not so sure.

1
5983854773a45b09a77a09ee97bdef42

on April 13, 2013
at 02:33 PM

Some people have had great success with a supplement called Relora. It's a combination of two herbs that naturally lower cortisol levels and have helped some people lose weight and lower stress levels.

Regarding your question, the second wind you are talking about is caused by over stimulation from things like computer screens, TV, cell phone screens, traffic lights, headlights -basically exposing yourself to excessive light, confusing our brains and delaying melanin production.

0
5983854773a45b09a77a09ee97bdef42

on April 13, 2013
at 09:03 PM

To answer your updated question, cortisol is a stress induced hormone. Anxiety, panic, overtraining at the gym, undernourishment, overall stress all correlate to cortisol levels. If you are carrying extra water weight in the mid section that sort of comes and goes it's a good indication that the stress hormone is out of balance.

If you are living the Paleo lifestyle then to piggy back on my first answer, you would rise with the sun and rest with the moon. In other words, as the sun sets and the day winds down, so do you. As night time encroaches, limit your exposure to bright lights, computer/tv/cell phone screens, and the like and go to bed earlier. If you close your eyes at night and your eyelids are twitching, that is a great indication that you are overstimulated and disrupting your circadian rhythm.

Overall cortisol levels can be lowered by lowering the stressful environment within your body. Creating an environment of "abundance" drastically lowers cortisol, which tends to rise with an environment of "scarcity". Eat often, train hard but limit your workouts to 45 minutes. Eat before and after you train. Eat first thing in the morning, hungry or not. Meditation. Herbs. These are all natural ways to control and limit cortisol while boosting your metabolism and testosterone production.

Answer Question


Get FREE instant access to our
Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!