4

votes

Difficult question about cortisol

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created December 07, 2012 at 9:39 AM

I have a question about cortisol. It is a bit difficult because I want an informative answer. But I know - Paleohackers are very knowledgeable so hopefully somebody out there knows :))) I will write something nice to you in return.

So, here are my questions:

  1. Are cortisol levels connected to meal times in our circadian rhythms?

  2. Please look at this picture - is this graph accurate? cortisol levels

  3. Does it mean that according to our circadian rhythms, we should eat at 7:45 - 8:00, 12:30-1:00 and 6:00-6:30. Am I correct in my assumptions?

THANK YOU!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!MUCHAS GRACIAS!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19413)

on December 10, 2012
at 01:09 AM

There's some videos here, haven't seen them, but might be helpful. http://drlam.com/vc

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19413)

on December 10, 2012
at 01:08 AM

There's some videos here, haven't seen them, but might be helpful. http://www.drlam.com/vc/ I got my info from a webinar Dr. Dan Kalish did a while ago, it's now being sold, was free when I saw it.

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19413)

on December 09, 2012
at 11:43 PM

Dr. Dan Kalish had some webinars that addressed this - which is probably what you want, not sure if replays are available, there's also bunches of podcasts and webpages about the HPA axis, adrenal burnout, etc. I think it's this one: "Adrenal Protocols for Salivary Testing" http://www.kalishresearch.com/practitioners/products.html - sadly it's not free, but there are tons of web resources if you google long enough. :) There's some more here, but not sure if it covers this topic: http://www.fmtown.com/public/department160.cfm

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19413)

on December 09, 2012
at 11:09 PM

@chrightfunnylol Yes, if you fast, you'll be using your own fat stores for energy. At that point glucose is spared for red blood cells and brain use only, and you become slightly insulin resistant in other tissues to make this happen, but this isn't a problem, it's a solution.

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on December 07, 2012
at 02:57 PM

I meant "format" :)))

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on December 07, 2012
at 02:57 PM

Thank you for your answer! You are a star! Could you please please please tell me where I can find more information in more or less comprehensible formal (like you wrote) on cortisol and its effect on circadian rhythm? By the way, how do you know this all? Thanks again!

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on December 07, 2012
at 02:55 PM

Don't worry - I am totally against snacking. I just want to figure out if it is true or not. Thank you SO MUCH!!! :)))

Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10989)

on December 07, 2012
at 02:22 PM

I'm also very interested in this and will be +1 'ing any informative answers.

2e1591c76896828077b930de5107f1af

on December 07, 2012
at 01:47 PM

+1 for the awsome anwser, can fasting cause fatty acid to be used as energy too?

  • F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

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2 Answers

3
96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19413)

on December 07, 2012
at 11:43 AM

They're going to be correlated to circadian rhythms. They can spike depending on stress levels, or fasting. If you have prolonged stress issues, they can get flipped around and you'll wake in the middle of the night instead of morning.

They're negatively correlated to melatonin. That is, when cortisol is high, melatonin is low. If you have low cortisol in the morning, you won't be able to easily wake up. If you have high cortisol at night, you won't be able to fall asleep.

If you're doing a prolonged fast, i.e. over 16 hours, cortisol levels will rise as a signal to start producing glucose from protein (usually by catabolic breakdown of muscle).

That graph is fairly normal.

2e1591c76896828077b930de5107f1af

on December 07, 2012
at 01:47 PM

+1 for the awsome anwser, can fasting cause fatty acid to be used as energy too?

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on December 07, 2012
at 02:57 PM

Thank you for your answer! You are a star! Could you please please please tell me where I can find more information in more or less comprehensible formal (like you wrote) on cortisol and its effect on circadian rhythm? By the way, how do you know this all? Thanks again!

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on December 07, 2012
at 02:57 PM

I meant "format" :)))

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19413)

on December 10, 2012
at 01:08 AM

There's some videos here, haven't seen them, but might be helpful. http://www.drlam.com/vc/ I got my info from a webinar Dr. Dan Kalish did a while ago, it's now being sold, was free when I saw it.

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19413)

on December 09, 2012
at 11:43 PM

Dr. Dan Kalish had some webinars that addressed this - which is probably what you want, not sure if replays are available, there's also bunches of podcasts and webpages about the HPA axis, adrenal burnout, etc. I think it's this one: "Adrenal Protocols for Salivary Testing" http://www.kalishresearch.com/practitioners/products.html - sadly it's not free, but there are tons of web resources if you google long enough. :) There's some more here, but not sure if it covers this topic: http://www.fmtown.com/public/department160.cfm

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19413)

on December 10, 2012
at 01:09 AM

There's some videos here, haven't seen them, but might be helpful. http://drlam.com/vc

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19413)

on December 09, 2012
at 11:09 PM

@chrightfunnylol Yes, if you fast, you'll be using your own fat stores for energy. At that point glucose is spared for red blood cells and brain use only, and you become slightly insulin resistant in other tissues to make this happen, but this isn't a problem, it's a solution.

2
194d8e8140425057fe06202e1e5822a7

(3979)

on December 07, 2012
at 10:24 AM

I think the answer depends on soooo many things: Your sleep schedule Your weight How physically active you are How fast your metabolism is What your meals consist of (this graph might be about carb-rich meals) Any health problems

Furthermore, I don't think the graph is recommending that you eat between those times, it is merely showing when most people eat those meals.

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on December 07, 2012
at 02:55 PM

Don't worry - I am totally against snacking. I just want to figure out if it is true or not. Thank you SO MUCH!!! :)))

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