1

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ASI Test Results - Anything in particular cause this?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created March 09, 2013 at 1:58 AM

So the obvious solution to me is work on relaxing before bed and hopefully that would keep my cortisol lower through the night, but any advice/insight at all is welcome. This explains a problem I've been having:

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543a65b3004bf5a51974fbdd60d666bb

(4493)

on October 30, 2013
at 12:22 AM

hi Kyle, if you are still having suboptimal sleep, you could try moving your vitamin C supp from night-time to morning or day time, i find that Vit C can make me more alert/energised, so not so great for sleep

43fbf0341e973a1381d43792e94661c6

(0)

on October 29, 2013
at 10:17 PM

@AxialGentleman

Hi there. The 30, 60, and 90 minute intervals sound very helpful. I'm looking into hormone issues and a good lab to get an ASI/hormone panel done. I'm curious which lab "your lab" is.

43fbf0341e973a1381d43792e94661c6

(0)

on October 29, 2013
at 10:14 PM

Similar problems. How much phosphatidylserine, and how did you get it? Supplement? Pill? Capsule?

F02990386b12528111740ad6279ba29d

(1363)

on July 13, 2013
at 10:36 PM

cool, I think I will give this a shot

F02990386b12528111740ad6279ba29d

(1363)

on July 13, 2013
at 10:35 PM

Thanks for the response. The morning sample I can't remember now, but I think the instructions said immediately upon waking up. But I don't know that I woke up and immediately jump out of bed... kind of a gray area there? That's good news though, sounds like I might be overreacting. I don't sleep so well and sometimes feel a bit stressed while laying in bed attempting to fall asleep (I try to meditate to help) so I think i went into this whole thing assuming I had high cortisol at night.

Cf08ad26759fdd206a2c9f9385080a57

(995)

on June 29, 2013
at 03:17 AM

You might want to also look into B3.

Ebb10603524dd22621c1155dd7ddf106

(19150)

on April 12, 2013
at 02:28 PM

You can edit the original post and make an innocuous change ... or just blatantly state that you are shamelessly bumping the question.

F02990386b12528111740ad6279ba29d

(1363)

on March 15, 2013
at 01:09 PM

If relevant: I take Iodine and Selenium each morning. Along with Zinc/copper (obviously did the test first). At Night I take magnesium and vitamin C.

F02990386b12528111740ad6279ba29d

(1363)

on March 09, 2013
at 02:11 AM

Probably getting off the computer right now would help!

  • F02990386b12528111740ad6279ba29d

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3 Answers

1
72cf727474b8bf815fdc505e58cadfea

on July 13, 2013
at 02:00 PM

Your results actually look okay to me.

When exactly was your "morning" sample taken? If your cortisol is high at the moment you wake up, that's bad. But most healthy people have a big cortisol spike 15-45 minutes after waking. It doesn't mean that your cortisol was high all night.

A cortisol awakening response actually a sign that your stress hormone system is functioning properly. The key is that after this rapid rise, your cortisol level should rapidly drop back to about where it was when you woke up. When my lab does studies on diurnal cortisol rhythms, we get three morning samples: right when you wake up, 30 minutes after waking, and 90 minutes after waking.

Your results don't have that, but we can look at the noon measure. The "high level" curve shows someone who may have a problem: their cortisol goes up and takes a long time to go back down. The "low level" curve also shows someone who may be unhealthy: lack of a morning rise is associated with disorders where you "burn out" your normal arousal response, like depression and PTSD. Your cortisol level goes up in the morning and then down to a fairly low level. That might be completely healthy. The fact that it goes back down is much more important than the extent to which it goes up.

F02990386b12528111740ad6279ba29d

(1363)

on July 13, 2013
at 10:35 PM

Thanks for the response. The morning sample I can't remember now, but I think the instructions said immediately upon waking up. But I don't know that I woke up and immediately jump out of bed... kind of a gray area there? That's good news though, sounds like I might be overreacting. I don't sleep so well and sometimes feel a bit stressed while laying in bed attempting to fall asleep (I try to meditate to help) so I think i went into this whole thing assuming I had high cortisol at night.

43fbf0341e973a1381d43792e94661c6

(0)

on October 29, 2013
at 10:17 PM

@AxialGentleman

Hi there. The 30, 60, and 90 minute intervals sound very helpful. I'm looking into hormone issues and a good lab to get an ASI/hormone panel done. I'm curious which lab "your lab" is.

1
D396b126240f584bc358e6e4fd84e9e3

on June 29, 2013
at 03:03 AM

I had a similar pattern (cortisol spiking at night) and corrected it by taking phosphatidylserine with dinner. I'd say within a couple weeks I was able to fall asleep easier and through the night. A subsequent adrenal panel showed normal night cortisol without supplementation of phosphatidylserine.

F02990386b12528111740ad6279ba29d

(1363)

on July 13, 2013
at 10:36 PM

cool, I think I will give this a shot

43fbf0341e973a1381d43792e94661c6

(0)

on October 29, 2013
at 10:14 PM

Similar problems. How much phosphatidylserine, and how did you get it? Supplement? Pill? Capsule?

0
F02990386b12528111740ad6279ba29d

(1363)

on March 15, 2013
at 01:04 PM

Is there a way to bump a thread without responding?

Ebb10603524dd22621c1155dd7ddf106

(19150)

on April 12, 2013
at 02:28 PM

You can edit the original post and make an innocuous change ... or just blatantly state that you are shamelessly bumping the question.

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