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Glutamine and Cortisol regulation?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created June 02, 2011 at 9:44 PM

I was helping my buddy with some dietary changes. When reviewing breakfast he mentioned he supplements with glutamine to lower cortisol in the morning. I've never heard that before? Does glutamin help with cortisol?

5ef574d7893bc816ec52e04139e9bc09

(6097)

on May 08, 2012
at 04:04 PM

Why do you need to counter rhodiola?

100fd85230060e754fc13394eee6d6f1

(18706)

on June 03, 2011
at 08:50 PM

(Fixed typo) No, it's not the same. Although one of the main things cortisol does is stimulate gluconeogenesis, just because gluconeogenesis is required, doesn't mean cortisol gets released. Blood sugar raising is normally driven by glucagon. Cortisol only comes into play if you are stressed, for example by fasting, lack of sleep, or exposure to caffeine or alcohol. Low blood sugar itself is not enough

100fd85230060e754fc13394eee6d6f1

(18706)

on June 03, 2011
at 01:39 PM

No, it's not the same. Although, one of the main things cortisol does is stimulate gluconeogenesis, just because gluconeogenesis is required, doesn't mean cortisol gets released. Blood sugar raising is normally driven by glucagon. Cortisol only comes into play if you are stressed, for example by fasting, lack of sleep, or exposure to caffeine or alcohol. Low blood sugar itself is not enough.

100fd85230060e754fc13394eee6d6f1

(18706)

on June 03, 2011
at 01:38 PM

Yes and no. One of the main things cortisol does is stimulate gluconeogenesis, but just because gluconeogenesis is required, doesn't mean cortisol gets released. Blood sugar raising is normally driven by glucagon. Cortisol only comes into play if you are stressed, for example by fasting, lack of sleep, or exposure to caffeine or alcohol. Low blood sugar itself is not enough.

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25472)

on June 02, 2011
at 11:56 PM

I use phosphotidylserine and choline to counter balance cortisol and rhodiola.

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25472)

on June 02, 2011
at 11:56 PM

more effective. Glutamine also increases GH too......but argining is more stimulative.

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on June 02, 2011
at 09:53 PM

I haven't heard that either. Interested to see what others say. You experiencing cortisol issues?

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4 Answers

1
100fd85230060e754fc13394eee6d6f1

(18706)

on June 03, 2011
at 02:51 PM

The only study I can find that claims this result doesn't seem well controlled to me: Increased plasma bicarbonate and growth hormone after an oral glutamine load. So I would hesitate to cite it as fact.

1
Medium avatar

on June 02, 2011
at 11:39 PM

Wouldn't some sweet potato do the same thing? Isn't cortisol principally involved in raising blood glucose and is catabolic because it's scavenging glucose from muscle tissue? Seems like repleting glycogen stores with starch immediately upon waking would shut down cortisol release and muscle catabolism.

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25472)

on June 02, 2011
at 11:56 PM

more effective. Glutamine also increases GH too......but argining is more stimulative.

100fd85230060e754fc13394eee6d6f1

(18706)

on June 03, 2011
at 01:38 PM

Yes and no. One of the main things cortisol does is stimulate gluconeogenesis, but just because gluconeogenesis is required, doesn't mean cortisol gets released. Blood sugar raising is normally driven by glucagon. Cortisol only comes into play if you are stressed, for example by fasting, lack of sleep, or exposure to caffeine or alcohol. Low blood sugar itself is not enough.

100fd85230060e754fc13394eee6d6f1

(18706)

on June 03, 2011
at 01:39 PM

No, it's not the same. Although, one of the main things cortisol does is stimulate gluconeogenesis, just because gluconeogenesis is required, doesn't mean cortisol gets released. Blood sugar raising is normally driven by glucagon. Cortisol only comes into play if you are stressed, for example by fasting, lack of sleep, or exposure to caffeine or alcohol. Low blood sugar itself is not enough.

100fd85230060e754fc13394eee6d6f1

(18706)

on June 03, 2011
at 08:50 PM

(Fixed typo) No, it's not the same. Although one of the main things cortisol does is stimulate gluconeogenesis, just because gluconeogenesis is required, doesn't mean cortisol gets released. Blood sugar raising is normally driven by glucagon. Cortisol only comes into play if you are stressed, for example by fasting, lack of sleep, or exposure to caffeine or alcohol. Low blood sugar itself is not enough

1
Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25472)

on June 02, 2011
at 11:35 PM

Glutamine can in some cases lower cortisol catabolic effects on the autonomic nervous system. Need pretty high doses.........I have not found it that helpful. Body builders love this but I dont see big effects.

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25472)

on June 02, 2011
at 11:56 PM

I use phosphotidylserine and choline to counter balance cortisol and rhodiola.

5ef574d7893bc816ec52e04139e9bc09

(6097)

on May 08, 2012
at 04:04 PM

Why do you need to counter rhodiola?

0
1a98a40ba8ffdc5aa28d1324d01c6c9f

(20378)

on June 03, 2011
at 02:45 AM

Cortisol counteracts your HGH and Glutamine increases it...

that is one reason I try not to exerice over 45 minutes at a time to prevent cortisol

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