3

votes

Is corn really that bad?

Answered on August 16, 2016
Created September 18, 2012 at 12:37 AM

Been paleo for a few months now, but recently i had some corn at a family dinner and it's like i fell in love with it all over again. Corn is one of those neolithic foods that i actually miss, along with sweet peas and white rice. What's so bad about most corn besides GMO's? What about the lectins and phytic acids? Is corn nutritionally empty like white rice? Is organic corn slightly better?

Bfd70bb38267fcc2d762063d691fa226

(723)

on March 23, 2013
at 03:50 PM

food in its simplest natural form is the way to go!

3dc940ac9be21e45cf83207814c8cd46

(544)

on February 14, 2013
at 02:37 PM

25 years ago or so, 4% of corn was Monsanto-type crap. Today it is reversed. Only 4% is not controlled by this corporate frankenfood giant. Mexico and SA has hundreds of varieties of corn which are being contaminated by Monsanto and pollen in the air.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on September 18, 2012
at 11:53 PM

Also, the digestible portion is gone, what you're seeing is the indigestible matrix.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on September 18, 2012
at 11:51 PM

+1 for moderation.

C56baa1b4f39839c018180bf63226f7d

(3499)

on September 18, 2012
at 09:56 PM

+1 for "this is my experience as well"

Medium avatar

(3213)

on September 18, 2012
at 09:42 PM

You are right, I was wrong. But i'm still against GMO vegetables

489497642ad41d4b45db4d07dbe54353

(978)

on September 18, 2012
at 08:43 PM

Corn is not high in fructose. Corn syrup is a glucose syrup, it take enzymes and heat to convert it. HFCS is an industrial product. This does not mean that corn is always good for you, it is just that fructose is not the problem. Many "corn syrup"s on the market, karo and the like, are now HFCS, so you can not assume that they are fructose free like they used to be.

9d741bcbe702044635f2ce3078043054

(1435)

on September 18, 2012
at 05:31 PM

Um, that's why we have teeth. There are lots of healthy foods that won't digest without adequate chewing. It's the first step in the digestive process. A few kernals escaping unscathed is not an indictment of corn.

9d741bcbe702044635f2ce3078043054

(1435)

on September 18, 2012
at 05:29 PM

Alvaro, our bodies can handle appropriate amounts of fructose. It most certainly comprised a sometimes significant fraction of paleolithic calories. It's the overconsumption of fructose in the SAD that's the problem.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on September 18, 2012
at 03:03 PM

Sometimes, in some people...

F9638b939a6f85d67f60065677193cad

(4266)

on September 18, 2012
at 01:29 PM

It's a pretty good butter delivery device.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on September 18, 2012
at 10:36 AM

@Alvaro, http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/vegetables-and-vegetable-products/2415/2. Free fructose is around 2% of carbohydrate. And it's not like fructose is necessarily bad for you, geez.

06ca9c524c28bc3fba95d4d90f8f43c6

on September 18, 2012
at 05:35 AM

Amy, you just opened up a can of worms with the soy! Why are you putting it in my tuna!!!!! I try to buy a couch for my living room, the damn thing has corn in it somewhere and soy sewn into the cushions.

Medium avatar

(3213)

on September 18, 2012
at 05:15 AM

Matt, corn is high in fructose

Medium avatar

(3213)

on September 18, 2012
at 05:12 AM

It's not only that it doesn't happen in nature to that extent, but did you know GMO corn is changed genetically to react well to pesticides?, i'm not sure if that's bad, but i'll let corn eaters find out

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on September 18, 2012
at 02:57 AM

I know that corn is essentially glucose and an ear of corn has a moderate amount of sugar compared to say sugar cane. The point was just to create an anchor point. Sorry if it was too overt.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on September 18, 2012
at 02:57 AM

@CD, my goats disagree with your assessment of hemlock. They eat it all the time, in moderation of course!

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on September 18, 2012
at 02:55 AM

What's with the hybrid disdain I've seen recently. It's a hybrid between varieties of corn, not between corn and a chicken.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on September 18, 2012
at 02:54 AM

Corn is *not* high in fructose.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on September 18, 2012
at 02:51 AM

Sweet corn as relatively little fructose, so the comparison is rather poor. HFCS is produced enzymatically from corn starch (this doesn't come from the kind of corn that's edible when fresh even).

Fd70d71f4f8195c3a098eda4fc817d4f

(8014)

on September 18, 2012
at 02:47 AM

Amen. I was going through the supermarket tonight, intentionally looking at things I don't normally look at, just to see what's out there these days that I don't buy anymore. Sausage from a local butcher/farmer? You're usually good to go. Sausage from the big national producers? I am not kidding when I say I picked up several kinds of PORK SAUSAGE that had "hydrolyzed corn, soy, and wheat proteins" among the ingredients. I am SO with you, Matt. If I want corn, I'll eat corn. But stop putting it in a damn pork sausage! (Don't get me started on the soy...)

Fd70d71f4f8195c3a098eda4fc817d4f

(8014)

on September 18, 2012
at 02:46 AM

Amen. I was going through the supermarket tonight, intentionally looking at things I don't normally look at, just to see what's out there these days that I don't buy anymore. Sausage from a local butcher/farmer? You're usually good to go. Sausage from the big national producers? I am not kidding when I say I picked up several kinds of PORK SAUSAGE that had "hydrolyzed corn, soy, and wheat proteins" among the ingredients. I am SO with you, Matt. If I want corn, I'll eat corn. But stop putting in a damn pork sausage! (Don't get me started on the soy...)

Fd70d71f4f8195c3a098eda4fc817d4f

(8014)

on September 18, 2012
at 02:42 AM

I'm not disagreeing with you that corn is a high-CHO grain, but I don't think it's helpful to *equate* it with HFCS. I could do something similar with rice and, say, Rice Krispies cereal, know what I mean?

Medium avatar

(19479)

on September 18, 2012
at 01:10 AM

I like the hemlock reference :) I'd throw in a few members of the datura family as well.

Medium avatar

(19479)

on September 18, 2012
at 01:07 AM

You're still going to absorb some carotenoids as well as other phytochemicals (especially if you go for some multi-colored heirloom variety, which would also negate the GMO concern).

Medium avatar

(3213)

on September 18, 2012
at 01:06 AM

Most of the times you can't feel the harm, even though it's happening

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on September 18, 2012
at 01:05 AM

@bunzel, "Maybe 2 or 3 times a year" -- no. other than hemlock, anything in moderation is fine.

5c9fda2bd0018516806bba200a93f6fa

(608)

on September 18, 2012
at 01:05 AM

True. Most industrially grown foods have been changed a lot through selective breeding. Most foods we eat now are basically hybrids.

Medium avatar

(3213)

on September 18, 2012
at 01:05 AM

I would say yes, try to get organic and sprout them if you can. It reduces the anti nutrients

5c9fda2bd0018516806bba200a93f6fa

(608)

on September 18, 2012
at 01:03 AM

Whats your stance on Sweet Peas? less offensive than corn?

Medium avatar

(19479)

on September 18, 2012
at 01:01 AM

Also, a large ear of corn would provide only about 20% of it's carbohydrates in the form of sugar (~5gms) with another 20% as fiber and the remaining 60% as starch. http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/vegetables-and-vegetable-products/2415/2

Medium avatar

(19479)

on September 18, 2012
at 01:01 AM

While it is true that phytic acid in corn is not deactivated via soaking (traditionally in "lime"/calcium carbonate) the addition of minerals (calcium from the lime) has been shown to negate the net effect of impaired nutrient absorption from the food. (http://jn.nutrition.org/content/135/11/2578.abstract) In other words, as long as you are getting your minerals from somewhere, you don't have to worry about corn phytates.

5c9fda2bd0018516806bba200a93f6fa

(608)

on September 18, 2012
at 12:56 AM

Alright. It was a one time thing though. I'm not gonna eat corn all the time. That would be a terrible idea. Once in a while shouldnt be too problematic, no? Maybe 2 or 3 times a year.

5c9fda2bd0018516806bba200a93f6fa

(608)

on September 18, 2012
at 12:54 AM

So is canned coconut milk, nut butters and cold pressed olive oils. I felt okay after eating it. Are there any important nutrients in corn? Any vitamins and minerals or are they hard to absorb anyway because of the phytic acid?

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on September 18, 2012
at 12:48 AM

Green peas, while a legume, are not like legumes.

Medium avatar

(19479)

on September 18, 2012
at 12:48 AM

By the way, almonds, broccoli, and cows are neolithic too.

Medium avatar

(19479)

on September 18, 2012
at 12:47 AM

Corn, sweet peas, and white rice are all relatively benign despite being on the Paleo no no list. There are plenty of paleo approved foods that contain higher levels of anti-nutrients and I would trust your gut...literally. If you feel good eating these foods there's no reason to stress out about having them on occasion.

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12 Answers

8
F9638b939a6f85d67f60065677193cad

(4266)

on September 18, 2012
at 01:31 PM

I eat corn on the cob now and then. I don't think it's such a bad thing. It's not like I'm basing my entire diet on corn or putting corn in every food I eat. Since it's not a big part of my diet, a little corn on the cob once in a blue moon isn't going to do anything bad to me.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on September 18, 2012
at 11:51 PM

+1 for moderation.

4
Medium avatar

(3213)

on September 18, 2012
at 01:00 AM

For me, the devil is in how genetically modified it has been through the years, if you saw corn as it naturally was, you wouldn't recognize it. Plus it is high in fructose and it disrupts your immune and digestive system.

There are studies linking excessive corn consumption, with lower levels of IQ in latin America.

Medium avatar

(3213)

on September 18, 2012
at 09:42 PM

You are right, I was wrong. But i'm still against GMO vegetables

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on September 18, 2012
at 02:54 AM

Corn is *not* high in fructose.

5c9fda2bd0018516806bba200a93f6fa

(608)

on September 18, 2012
at 01:03 AM

Whats your stance on Sweet Peas? less offensive than corn?

9d741bcbe702044635f2ce3078043054

(1435)

on September 18, 2012
at 05:29 PM

Alvaro, our bodies can handle appropriate amounts of fructose. It most certainly comprised a sometimes significant fraction of paleolithic calories. It's the overconsumption of fructose in the SAD that's the problem.

5c9fda2bd0018516806bba200a93f6fa

(608)

on September 18, 2012
at 01:05 AM

True. Most industrially grown foods have been changed a lot through selective breeding. Most foods we eat now are basically hybrids.

Medium avatar

(3213)

on September 18, 2012
at 05:12 AM

It's not only that it doesn't happen in nature to that extent, but did you know GMO corn is changed genetically to react well to pesticides?, i'm not sure if that's bad, but i'll let corn eaters find out

Medium avatar

(3213)

on September 18, 2012
at 01:05 AM

I would say yes, try to get organic and sprout them if you can. It reduces the anti nutrients

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on September 18, 2012
at 02:55 AM

What's with the hybrid disdain I've seen recently. It's a hybrid between varieties of corn, not between corn and a chicken.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on September 18, 2012
at 10:36 AM

@Alvaro, http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/vegetables-and-vegetable-products/2415/2. Free fructose is around 2% of carbohydrate. And it's not like fructose is necessarily bad for you, geez.

Medium avatar

(3213)

on September 18, 2012
at 05:15 AM

Matt, corn is high in fructose

489497642ad41d4b45db4d07dbe54353

(978)

on September 18, 2012
at 08:43 PM

Corn is not high in fructose. Corn syrup is a glucose syrup, it take enzymes and heat to convert it. HFCS is an industrial product. This does not mean that corn is always good for you, it is just that fructose is not the problem. Many "corn syrup"s on the market, karo and the like, are now HFCS, so you can not assume that they are fructose free like they used to be.

2
06ca9c524c28bc3fba95d4d90f8f43c6

on September 18, 2012
at 01:30 AM

If wanted to eat corn I would personally like to make the choice. Eating paleo aside, it really chaps me the wrong way that corn is somehow in EVERYTHING in the SAD. I just don't eat now on principle alone, health benefits aside.

-Matt
PhysiqueRescue.com

06ca9c524c28bc3fba95d4d90f8f43c6

on September 18, 2012
at 05:35 AM

Amy, you just opened up a can of worms with the soy! Why are you putting it in my tuna!!!!! I try to buy a couch for my living room, the damn thing has corn in it somewhere and soy sewn into the cushions.

Fd70d71f4f8195c3a098eda4fc817d4f

(8014)

on September 18, 2012
at 02:46 AM

Amen. I was going through the supermarket tonight, intentionally looking at things I don't normally look at, just to see what's out there these days that I don't buy anymore. Sausage from a local butcher/farmer? You're usually good to go. Sausage from the big national producers? I am not kidding when I say I picked up several kinds of PORK SAUSAGE that had "hydrolyzed corn, soy, and wheat proteins" among the ingredients. I am SO with you, Matt. If I want corn, I'll eat corn. But stop putting in a damn pork sausage! (Don't get me started on the soy...)

Fd70d71f4f8195c3a098eda4fc817d4f

(8014)

on September 18, 2012
at 02:47 AM

Amen. I was going through the supermarket tonight, intentionally looking at things I don't normally look at, just to see what's out there these days that I don't buy anymore. Sausage from a local butcher/farmer? You're usually good to go. Sausage from the big national producers? I am not kidding when I say I picked up several kinds of PORK SAUSAGE that had "hydrolyzed corn, soy, and wheat proteins" among the ingredients. I am SO with you, Matt. If I want corn, I'll eat corn. But stop putting it in a damn pork sausage! (Don't get me started on the soy...)

1
2a00b9a42e4cb6e489a0e69d20714576

on September 18, 2012
at 09:21 PM

Corn is totally GMO by Monsonta, not selectively bred but chemically altered. It is not food! Please do some serious research about terminator seeds and gmo corn.

1
193b7fb0fec8913d5ebb3b99a04d21c6

(2918)

on September 18, 2012
at 01:14 PM

Corn is a big cheat for me, and I still feel guilty eating it, but I occasionally make an allowance for corn if it's been grilled, dipped in crema fresca, and slathered with red pepper and parmesan. And chips when I have Mexican food. And popcorn. Yeah, I still love corn. Oh well.

1
77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on September 18, 2012
at 12:59 AM

Decide for yourself and hit up the oracle (google).

For me...

Zein from corn is as bad or worse than wheat. It messes me up really bad...

If it doesn't hurt you just enjoy it.

Medium avatar

(3213)

on September 18, 2012
at 01:06 AM

Most of the times you can't feel the harm, even though it's happening

C56baa1b4f39839c018180bf63226f7d

(3499)

on September 18, 2012
at 09:56 PM

+1 for "this is my experience as well"

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on September 18, 2012
at 03:03 PM

Sometimes, in some people...

0
D8983902b07fde47ca9bf19d238b4743

on August 16, 2016
at 07:41 PM

I think its original characteristics would have been harmless, but after it has been GM'd, it has probably aquired similar changes like gluten has eg GM wheat has turned the gluten protein into, 'Frankinstein Gluten', which our intestines can no longer digest and which errodes the delicate surfacesof intestinal vili. That is the main reason why our bodies rejects the material because it is no longer compatabile with our gut bacteria to break it down. 

0
7b6791940a3c9caa0362421a63efd134

on August 08, 2016
at 01:18 AM

Can I eat fresh corn on the cob?

0
8383e4812022d6e2216d65403da494e6

on February 14, 2013
at 11:04 AM

According to lectinology, the lectin that occurs in corn (Zea mays) agglutinates to all blood types EXCEPT blood type A, SECRETOR. Yes, remember that our personal nutrients/O2/hormones/waste delivery system (that is, blood) is a very complex organ. Sensitivity isn't just about its particular surface markers or antigens, but also about whether or not we secrete those antigens in all of our fluids. About eighty percent of every blood type is a secretor.

On a side-note, non-secretors are invisible to many types of criminal tests because they leave no dan "fingerprint":

A biological sample may not always contain sufficient DNA to obtain a DNA profile. Individuals may be known as secretors or non-secretors. Secretors present aspects of their blood’s protein in other bodily fluids, whereas non-secretors will not have sufficient levels of protein in their bodily fluid to establish a match between two samples. Fortunately, the percentage of the population who are non-secretors is comparatively small.

--http://www.forensicsciencecentral.co.uk/biology.shtml

0
B41cdb2253976ba9b429dd608d02c21f

(1495)

on September 18, 2012
at 12:48 PM

It doesn't really digest...hence whole kernels in poop. I look at this way - what's the point of eating something that won't digest?

F9638b939a6f85d67f60065677193cad

(4266)

on September 18, 2012
at 01:29 PM

It's a pretty good butter delivery device.

9d741bcbe702044635f2ce3078043054

(1435)

on September 18, 2012
at 05:31 PM

Um, that's why we have teeth. There are lots of healthy foods that won't digest without adequate chewing. It's the first step in the digestive process. A few kernals escaping unscathed is not an indictment of corn.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on September 18, 2012
at 11:53 PM

Also, the digestible portion is gone, what you're seeing is the indigestible matrix.

0
3491e51730101b18724dc57c86601173

(8395)

on September 18, 2012
at 06:52 AM

I love corn--I craved it during both pregnancies. A hot buttered ear of corn spells summer to me. So a few times this summer I said yes to corn. 3 ears all year is not going to kill me. I don't eat corn meal or corn flour products, no chips, tortillas, corn bread, Polenta, or processed foods containing corn. But I figure I can get away with a few ears of buttered corn.

Bfd70bb38267fcc2d762063d691fa226

(723)

on March 23, 2013
at 03:50 PM

food in its simplest natural form is the way to go!

0
3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on September 18, 2012
at 12:48 AM

Corn is a grain. And it's a sugar-filled grain (you know, high fructose corn syrup). You are MUCH better off with white rice.

Corn is also higher in phytic acid than many other grains, and retains it's phytics even after soaking.

Medium avatar

(19479)

on September 18, 2012
at 01:10 AM

I like the hemlock reference :) I'd throw in a few members of the datura family as well.

Medium avatar

(19479)

on September 18, 2012
at 01:01 AM

Also, a large ear of corn would provide only about 20% of it's carbohydrates in the form of sugar (~5gms) with another 20% as fiber and the remaining 60% as starch. http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/vegetables-and-vegetable-products/2415/2

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on September 18, 2012
at 12:48 AM

Green peas, while a legume, are not like legumes.

5c9fda2bd0018516806bba200a93f6fa

(608)

on September 18, 2012
at 12:56 AM

Alright. It was a one time thing though. I'm not gonna eat corn all the time. That would be a terrible idea. Once in a while shouldnt be too problematic, no? Maybe 2 or 3 times a year.

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on September 18, 2012
at 02:57 AM

I know that corn is essentially glucose and an ear of corn has a moderate amount of sugar compared to say sugar cane. The point was just to create an anchor point. Sorry if it was too overt.

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on September 18, 2012
at 01:05 AM

@bunzel, "Maybe 2 or 3 times a year" -- no. other than hemlock, anything in moderation is fine.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on September 18, 2012
at 02:51 AM

Sweet corn as relatively little fructose, so the comparison is rather poor. HFCS is produced enzymatically from corn starch (this doesn't come from the kind of corn that's edible when fresh even).

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on September 18, 2012
at 02:57 AM

@CD, my goats disagree with your assessment of hemlock. They eat it all the time, in moderation of course!

Medium avatar

(19479)

on September 18, 2012
at 01:01 AM

While it is true that phytic acid in corn is not deactivated via soaking (traditionally in "lime"/calcium carbonate) the addition of minerals (calcium from the lime) has been shown to negate the net effect of impaired nutrient absorption from the food. (http://jn.nutrition.org/content/135/11/2578.abstract) In other words, as long as you are getting your minerals from somewhere, you don't have to worry about corn phytates.

Fd70d71f4f8195c3a098eda4fc817d4f

(8014)

on September 18, 2012
at 02:42 AM

I'm not disagreeing with you that corn is a high-CHO grain, but I don't think it's helpful to *equate* it with HFCS. I could do something similar with rice and, say, Rice Krispies cereal, know what I mean?

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