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2 foods: Peas and Corn... explain?

Answered on January 07, 2014
Created January 03, 2014 at 5:49 AM

These are both clearly not "paleo" - they're both the product of selective breeding and corn in particular is pretty much all GMO. That aside, why should we avoid either of them?

Keep in mind that I'm definitely NOT low carb, nor dogmatically "paleo" - I eat to maximize nutrition, minimize toxins, and keep my digestive system running well. Peas and corn seem to be real good for regularity - one of the things I started paleo for.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on January 06, 2014
at 11:15 PM

Starch ---hydrolysis--> glucose (& maltose) ---enzymatic isomerization--> fructose

Medium avatar

(624)

on January 06, 2014
at 09:55 PM

You're kidding - HFCS is actually made by converting glucose into fructose? I thought they just extracted fructose from corn. Guess I didn't do my research...

161750c67d1c0a39309fa8fa06ce1d35

(0)

on January 03, 2014
at 08:33 PM

I thought Quinoa was a pseudo-grain related to spinach, not grass (like wheat, maize, etc...)? I know as much as it is gluten-free...

Now I want to pick up a bag and see what it's like out of curiosity alone.

161750c67d1c0a39309fa8fa06ce1d35

(0)

on January 03, 2014
at 07:55 PM

I'm pretty sure it's actually glucose. As I remember it, that's where we get corn syrup from (or used to as it's often blended now). In the 50's or 60's scientists/manufacturers started using enzymes to convert glucose from into fructose; high fructose corn syrup was born and has been ruining our lives and our food ever since. Fructose is found in a lot of fruits in its natural form.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on January 03, 2014
at 07:31 PM

Everything comes down to N=1 compatibility. And if you eat a varied diet (that's a paleo rule that oft-forgotten), you can get away with anything really.

Medium avatar

(624)

on January 03, 2014
at 07:05 PM

I'm not a huge fan of sweet corns. Let it sit in your fridge or on your counter for a while and it seems to get more starchy. Sweet corn goes really nice in some dishes though. Is that mostly fructose making it sweet or is there a lot of glucose?

Medium avatar

(624)

on January 03, 2014
at 07:03 PM

You've certainly given my the answer that I *wanted* to hear. Let's hope you're right. It does make sense.

56c28e3654d4dd8a8abdb2c1f525202e

(1822)

on January 03, 2014
at 03:37 PM

Back from visiting home, where relatives eat wheat products four times a day, and I could not agree more. The dose makes the poison. Peas are so nutritious, why avoid them. And corn, at least for me, is more digestible than wheat. Keep in mind that from Mexico to Arizona, people may have been short but they had no diseases of civilization on the Three Sisters diet plus some bugs, vegetable and fruits.

543a65b3004bf5a51974fbdd60d666bb

(4493)

on January 03, 2014
at 07:40 AM

not answering your question i know (sorry)...but its 'interesting' that the outside shells of the sweet corn seeds (the pericarp) pass thru the body undigested in most/all people (afaik). in fact it is suggested that sweetcorn can be used to test bowel transit time.

idk if these shells pose any harm to your insides as they pass thru?

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6 Answers

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32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on January 03, 2014
at 03:15 PM

Selective breeding and GMOs are not good reasons for avoiding peas and corn.

Sure, carb content is enough to scare off low-carbers, but like you said, you're not a low-carber.

Toxins (i.e. anti-nutrients) are largely bullshit. The addage always has been: the dose makes the poison. A serving of corn or peas occasionally has such a small amount of lectin, phytate or troublesome protein that our bodies can certainly handle it without issue (assuming N=1 compatibility). Anti-nutrients and mild toxins only become a problem at higher, chronic (daily) doses, even then, it's not that common!

Not sure it really keeps your GI in order… you simply see the insoluble fiber passing through (corn is digested despite "whole" kernels appearing).

I like corn, it's very tasty. It's more of a veggie than a grain when fresh, though it's a starchy veggie. Peas, too, are more a veggie than a legume. Unless you have a damn good reason for cutting them, there's little reason to.

56c28e3654d4dd8a8abdb2c1f525202e

(1822)

on January 03, 2014
at 03:37 PM

Back from visiting home, where relatives eat wheat products four times a day, and I could not agree more. The dose makes the poison. Peas are so nutritious, why avoid them. And corn, at least for me, is more digestible than wheat. Keep in mind that from Mexico to Arizona, people may have been short but they had no diseases of civilization on the Three Sisters diet plus some bugs, vegetable and fruits.

Medium avatar

(624)

on January 03, 2014
at 07:03 PM

You've certainly given my the answer that I *wanted* to hear. Let's hope you're right. It does make sense.

0
Medium avatar

on January 07, 2014
at 05:04 PM

Awesome answers guys. This is why I love paleohacks. Some vague curiosity leads to concrete, actionable elucidation. I'll continue to eat peas and corn in moderation as part of a balanced, varied diet. They've never given me any trouble anyway.

0
73405829e4cd62de86d52ef5c557dc42

on January 03, 2014
at 08:28 PM

Corn is apparently very inflammatory and full of sugar (corn syrup?). Personally I used to allow myself some tacos with corn tortillas and popcorn on occasion as a cheat. I have completely eliminated corn for the past 2 months and I feel better then I did eating it so there's that

0
3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on January 03, 2014
at 08:08 PM

I do not use botanical definitions for my version of "paleo". I look at the species and determine whether that species is healthy for me to consume.

In terms of legumes I eat: Peas, Green Beans, Cannellini Beans, Black Beas, Lentils, and Peanuts. There is absolutely no reason to avoid them.

In terms of grains, I eat: Rice (wild and white but not brown -- but that's taste more than anything else), Corn (occasionally, I like it grilled, but other than that not a big fan), and Quinoa (assuming it is a grain, I've heard mixed things).

161750c67d1c0a39309fa8fa06ce1d35

(0)

on January 03, 2014
at 08:33 PM

I thought Quinoa was a pseudo-grain related to spinach, not grass (like wheat, maize, etc...)? I know as much as it is gluten-free...

Now I want to pick up a bag and see what it's like out of curiosity alone.

0
161750c67d1c0a39309fa8fa06ce1d35

on January 03, 2014
at 07:39 PM

Most GMO corn is completely inedible and used for corn-based products such as fuel and plastics. Way too many people don't understand this because of all the scare tactics and fear mongering out there by people who are just "Science is bad! Government is bad! Frankenfood! Rawrrawrrawr, pay attention to us!" with absolutely no understanding of what they hate, or only selective understanding of it. The voice of hate and deceit has historically been louder and more violent than the voice of reason and truth.

Selective breeding is totally different and has been done for millions of years for/by all types of plants. The biggest culprit of selective breeding is Mother Nature; what an evil bitch. How dare she create hybrids and promote survival of the fittest/survival by way of ensuring dissemination! How dare she make my acorn squash taste like cucumbers!... wait, that was because I planted my acorn squash too close to my cukes. My bad. :P (and yes, those were pretty yucky squash when cooked up)

I think Matt has answered all of your questions best. Thumbs up to his answers.

Peas are actually very healthy for you. Tons of dietary fiber. Very high in Vit C and A, with respectable amounts of Magnesium, Iron and Potassium.

Maize is high in calories, fatty and is packed with carbs. It is higher in fiber than peas, and way higher (double) in Magnesium, Iron and B6.

0
2a6025992746ff6cd4ffb6ccf0aa03fc

on January 03, 2014
at 07:47 AM

I personally am perfectly happy eating fresh peas once in a while. I don't eat corn because it is too sweet to my taste and doesn't digest well.

Medium avatar

(624)

on January 03, 2014
at 07:05 PM

I'm not a huge fan of sweet corns. Let it sit in your fridge or on your counter for a while and it seems to get more starchy. Sweet corn goes really nice in some dishes though. Is that mostly fructose making it sweet or is there a lot of glucose?

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