1

votes

Worthwhile to use raw dairy (cream) in hot foods?

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created May 06, 2011 at 4:05 PM

Something I've been wondering, is there still a benefit to using raw cream in hot coffee? I checked with a thermometer and the coffee starts out around 170F when I put the cream in, but sometimes I microwave it back up to 180F.

My two options are Clover Organic (pasteurized) or Organic Pastures (unpasteurized).

Both are organic, mostly grass fed, unhomogenized, high butterfat, and relatively local.

I would assume that for any extended cooking, there's not much point in using raw dairy. But a few tablespoons in hot coffee?

Organic Pastures is substantially more expensive so I'm trying to use it where it counts most.

673f7ad6052448d51496f177395416b7

(344)

on November 17, 2011
at 07:17 PM

so then it's basically useless to buy ultra-pasteurized pasture fed cream, correct? the "pasture fed" part would be moot?

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25472)

on May 07, 2011
at 01:54 AM

Heating will liberate some but the presence of fat is more critical.

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25472)

on May 07, 2011
at 01:54 AM

U2 is bound to the cholorplasts in grasses that ruminants eat. Their gut are able to liberate the k1 and k2. Most of the ruminate k2 is found in their fats. Cream and butter. Interestingly when humans eat plant derived k vitamins in leafy greens we can't liberate them because they are bound to chloroplasts. But out gut bacteria can liberate them. What increases the liberation? If you eat the green leafy foods soaked in fat like butter or coconut oil it increases k absorption from 15% to 40%. Vitamin k2 is vital to bones and brain maintenance and keeping calcium out of vessels.

03f5a69fde4012b827ebdb6d93b71e7a

(2007)

on May 06, 2011
at 06:29 PM

All other things equal (i.e. dairy quality), why is vit K2 present in raw dairy? And is it maintained through (some) heating?

03f5a69fde4012b827ebdb6d93b71e7a

(2007)

on May 06, 2011
at 05:18 PM

This was my assumption as well but I thought it might be an oversimplification of the pasteurization process.

03f5a69fde4012b827ebdb6d93b71e7a

(2007)

on May 06, 2011
at 05:17 PM

It definitely doesn't. I'm quite sure he means Organic Valley, which is ultrapasteurized and thus needs it.

B4ec9ce369e43ea83f06ee645169cee0

on May 06, 2011
at 04:37 PM

Futureboy... do you mean Organic Valley? Can you provide a link to a source?

Medium avatar

(5639)

on May 06, 2011
at 04:31 PM

Organic Pastures cream has carageenan in it. :(

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3 Answers

2
9a5e2da94ad63ea3186dfa494e16a8d1

on May 06, 2011
at 05:28 PM

To get the enzyme effect that most people look for with raw milk, you need to drink it fresh and cold. As the other poster noted, once you heat it above about 150F, you start to kill off all of the enzymes.

A rule of thumb is that if you stick your finger into a liquid and it feels noticeably hot, like you can't keep your finger in there for more than a second or two, it is at the temp that will kill enzymes, something like 125F give or take.

This is one of the reasons that it is hard to make yogurt or kefir out of raw milk while still retaining the enyzmes, usually you need to heat milk up to around 160F to denature the protiens which will allow for a smooth and creamy yogurt. If you don't do this, it clumps up and separates like cottage cheese. Probably better for you but not as yummy.

1
0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19245)

on May 06, 2011
at 04:25 PM

Milk or cream is pasteurised by heating it to 161??F (72??C) for 15 seconds and then it is rapidly cooled.

Pouring raw cream into hot coffee probably has a similar effect.

03f5a69fde4012b827ebdb6d93b71e7a

(2007)

on May 06, 2011
at 05:18 PM

This was my assumption as well but I thought it might be an oversimplification of the pasteurization process.

0
Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25472)

on May 06, 2011
at 06:12 PM

the main reason to use raw dairy anything is because of the vitamin K2 levels. That is all. It is one of the few sources left. If you dont eat raw butter or cream you must supplement or eat natto if you can even find it.

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25472)

on May 07, 2011
at 01:54 AM

U2 is bound to the cholorplasts in grasses that ruminants eat. Their gut are able to liberate the k1 and k2. Most of the ruminate k2 is found in their fats. Cream and butter. Interestingly when humans eat plant derived k vitamins in leafy greens we can't liberate them because they are bound to chloroplasts. But out gut bacteria can liberate them. What increases the liberation? If you eat the green leafy foods soaked in fat like butter or coconut oil it increases k absorption from 15% to 40%. Vitamin k2 is vital to bones and brain maintenance and keeping calcium out of vessels.

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25472)

on May 07, 2011
at 01:54 AM

Heating will liberate some but the presence of fat is more critical.

03f5a69fde4012b827ebdb6d93b71e7a

(2007)

on May 06, 2011
at 06:29 PM

All other things equal (i.e. dairy quality), why is vit K2 present in raw dairy? And is it maintained through (some) heating?

673f7ad6052448d51496f177395416b7

(344)

on November 17, 2011
at 07:17 PM

so then it's basically useless to buy ultra-pasteurized pasture fed cream, correct? the "pasture fed" part would be moot?

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