1

votes

What omelette pan do you recommend?

Answered on January 31, 2018
Created May 20, 2012 at 8:49 PM

I had an enamel omelette pan but it got thrown out while I was out of town (WTH?!). Now, I'm using a teflon pan that is new -so no scratches,yet- but I want to get something that is more durable and less toxic. And, of course, that my omelette won't stick to.

What do you use? What do think of its quality for price? How is it holding up? Is it easy to care for? Any features you like or dislike? Comparisons with other pans you've used?

Thanks for your input!

5662d1262516ccbd70249e7aeaf58901

(681)

on June 02, 2012
at 03:44 AM

@MiMintzer, I got my De Buyer frying pan a week ago. I like it. It's kind of heavy, but that's fine with me because it hits muscles on the back of the forearm that don't get used much and are antagonist to gripping muscles that get used all the time. One thing that unusual is that you wash them with just hot water and a sponge -- no detergent. That means it isn't as clean as a non-stick coating, but on balance I'm more comfortable with it than the coatings.

782d92f4127823bdfb2ddfcbcf961d0e

(5231)

on May 28, 2012
at 08:16 PM

I've looked into the De Buyer pans and they look really good. The price doesn't seem so bad either. Went to Williams and Sonoma here to see them but not in stock. :-( Don't want to get until I actually get to handle one. Thanks for your input!

61844af1187e745e09bb394cbd28cf23

(11048)

on May 21, 2012
at 03:48 PM

The temperature is absolutely important! The Frugal Gourmet used to say, "Hot pan, cold oil, food won't stick!" =)

366c23d69eadce094a2b22299c58a424

(2988)

on May 21, 2012
at 12:12 PM

I use about 1.5 T of butter to fry 2 eggs. I don't think of that as a huge amount, but then, I really like butter. I don't know that you need that much -- I do think the temperature of the pan before adding anything is the most important factor.

F15e0bae42dbf0b8cfc71e62902497b4

(2036)

on May 21, 2012
at 06:12 AM

also, I've never seen any evidence that mesurable amounts of iron actually get into the bloodstream from seasoned cast iron cookware.

61844af1187e745e09bb394cbd28cf23

(11048)

on May 21, 2012
at 03:47 AM

Blitherakt, how is that "not strictly frying eggs in the traditional sense?" I use butter, coconut oil, a combination of both, or bacon grease to fry eggs.

F0e558010a2ecb31fa37b7c491596b8e

(3850)

on May 21, 2012
at 03:37 AM

I totally recommend De Buyer pans. Once properly seasoned (doesn't take long) they are like butter. Don't be afraid of bare metal pans. Every omlette station I've ever seen has used them - not teflon. (I do agree to keep a cheap stainless pan around for cooking tomato sauce and the like).

5662d1262516ccbd70249e7aeaf58901

(681)

on May 21, 2012
at 02:28 AM

@Blitherakt, good point. It would probably be good to pair it with stainless steel or something for acidic and saucy foods.

A4216f1b1e1f5ab3815bd91700905081

(1646)

on May 21, 2012
at 02:19 AM

Keep in mind that carbon steel is reactive, so absolutely no acidic ingredients should hit that pan. At best, it'll turn nasty colors, and at worst you can leech some bad metals into your food.

A4216f1b1e1f5ab3815bd91700905081

(1646)

on May 21, 2012
at 02:17 AM

Heh. Not strictly frying eggs in the traditional sense. That's more like making fried chicken; a big layer of fat to act as a buffer between the pan and food. Now I'm going to have to load up one of my pans with a ridiculous amount of ghee and give it a go!

A4216f1b1e1f5ab3815bd91700905081

(1646)

on May 21, 2012
at 01:51 AM

With the exception, in my mind, of a well taken care of cast iron skillet from the late 1800's or early 1900's. As long as nobody strips the seasoning, those things make Teflon look grabby.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on May 21, 2012
at 01:07 AM

I've read, watched and listened to numerous top chefs and they all say the same thing: teflon is a blessing when it comes to omelets/eggs.

A4216f1b1e1f5ab3815bd91700905081

(1646)

on May 21, 2012
at 12:15 AM

@CavemanMike: males can suffer from iron deficiency as well as females; females are just more prone to the condition.

1ea8d17bad42dc54fb7a8a178e3db309

(603)

on May 20, 2012
at 11:43 PM

I've had my SCanpans for a few years... I usually use a bit of coconut oil spray when making omlettes and they always are nonstick. No flaking. Love them.

2e5dc29c61f97d335ffb990508424719

on May 20, 2012
at 11:14 PM

@Caveman because It helps move oxygen to every cell in your body and it is a common element that we have a long evolutioary histroy with. Would you rather have teflon or aluminum? @ MM Very high heat, wait until the oil starts smoking. This is better to do outside on a grill w/ a side burner. After it cools, rub with your chosen oil. Beef tallow is OK, too

782d92f4127823bdfb2ddfcbcf961d0e

(5231)

on May 20, 2012
at 10:30 PM

i've researched the pfoa's a bit and have seen complaints about chipping and losing its non-stick ability. how long have you had your pan? is the quality different than other pfoa-free pans?

782d92f4127823bdfb2ddfcbcf961d0e

(5231)

on May 20, 2012
at 10:26 PM

how difficult is it to season? how long did it take before it became nonstick? does the seasoning wear off?

7fc82eebafd44badc73c520f44660150

(3275)

on May 20, 2012
at 10:22 PM

As a male, why would I want iron leeching from the pan into me?

  • 782d92f4127823bdfb2ddfcbcf961d0e

    asked by

    (5231)
  • Views
    3.6K
  • Last Activity
    286D AGO
Frontpage book

Get FREE instant access to our Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!

8 Answers

best answer

3
5662d1262516ccbd70249e7aeaf58901

(681)

on May 21, 2012
at 01:05 AM

I've been investigating this myself. I asked a chef, and he recommended carbon steel. That's what they use in the kitchen. In fact that's what chefs have always used. It's a traditional technology. It works well and it's durable. If it's seasoned properly, it's non stick.

A few names have come up in my investigations: De Buyer, Matfer, and Paderno.

My chef friend recommends just going to a local chef supply store, that is, one where professional cooks would go to.

It's interesting that all the domestic kitchen supply stores around me only sell pans with fancy-pants space-aged coatings. I guess it too hard to sell just plain steel.

A4216f1b1e1f5ab3815bd91700905081

(1646)

on May 21, 2012
at 02:19 AM

Keep in mind that carbon steel is reactive, so absolutely no acidic ingredients should hit that pan. At best, it'll turn nasty colors, and at worst you can leech some bad metals into your food.

F0e558010a2ecb31fa37b7c491596b8e

(3850)

on May 21, 2012
at 03:37 AM

I totally recommend De Buyer pans. Once properly seasoned (doesn't take long) they are like butter. Don't be afraid of bare metal pans. Every omlette station I've ever seen has used them - not teflon. (I do agree to keep a cheap stainless pan around for cooking tomato sauce and the like).

5662d1262516ccbd70249e7aeaf58901

(681)

on May 21, 2012
at 02:28 AM

@Blitherakt, good point. It would probably be good to pair it with stainless steel or something for acidic and saucy foods.

782d92f4127823bdfb2ddfcbcf961d0e

(5231)

on May 28, 2012
at 08:16 PM

I've looked into the De Buyer pans and they look really good. The price doesn't seem so bad either. Went to Williams and Sonoma here to see them but not in stock. :-( Don't want to get until I actually get to handle one. Thanks for your input!

5662d1262516ccbd70249e7aeaf58901

(681)

on June 02, 2012
at 03:44 AM

@MiMintzer, I got my De Buyer frying pan a week ago. I like it. It's kind of heavy, but that's fine with me because it hits muscles on the back of the forearm that don't get used much and are antagonist to gripping muscles that get used all the time. One thing that unusual is that you wash them with just hot water and a sponge -- no detergent. That means it isn't as clean as a non-stick coating, but on balance I'm more comfortable with it than the coatings.

4
2e5dc29c61f97d335ffb990508424719

on May 20, 2012
at 09:31 PM

I usea 7" cast iron. Inexpensive. You can get it at any home store, camping supply store or tag sale. Season it with lard or cocconut oil.

7fc82eebafd44badc73c520f44660150

(3275)

on May 20, 2012
at 10:22 PM

As a male, why would I want iron leeching from the pan into me?

A4216f1b1e1f5ab3815bd91700905081

(1646)

on May 21, 2012
at 12:15 AM

@CavemanMike: males can suffer from iron deficiency as well as females; females are just more prone to the condition.

782d92f4127823bdfb2ddfcbcf961d0e

(5231)

on May 20, 2012
at 10:26 PM

how difficult is it to season? how long did it take before it became nonstick? does the seasoning wear off?

2e5dc29c61f97d335ffb990508424719

on May 20, 2012
at 11:14 PM

@Caveman because It helps move oxygen to every cell in your body and it is a common element that we have a long evolutioary histroy with. Would you rather have teflon or aluminum? @ MM Very high heat, wait until the oil starts smoking. This is better to do outside on a grill w/ a side burner. After it cools, rub with your chosen oil. Beef tallow is OK, too

F15e0bae42dbf0b8cfc71e62902497b4

(2036)

on May 21, 2012
at 06:12 AM

also, I've never seen any evidence that mesurable amounts of iron actually get into the bloodstream from seasoned cast iron cookware.

2
A4216f1b1e1f5ab3815bd91700905081

on May 21, 2012
at 12:22 AM

To my mind, there's not substitute for a Teflon coated pan for omlets, short of your great-great-grandmother's cast iron skillet.

I've never been able to get the nonstick properties in any other pan that promised them: annodized aluminum, The Green Pans that Target carried for a while (those worked with exactly one omlet). Enameled cast iron will do the trick, but I find them too heavy to use like a saut??e or omlet pan.

I just purchase the cheap metal handled pans from the grocery store and throw them in the recycling bin when they get scratched.

A4216f1b1e1f5ab3815bd91700905081

(1646)

on May 21, 2012
at 01:51 AM

With the exception, in my mind, of a well taken care of cast iron skillet from the late 1800's or early 1900's. As long as nobody strips the seasoning, those things make Teflon look grabby.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on May 21, 2012
at 01:07 AM

I've read, watched and listened to numerous top chefs and they all say the same thing: teflon is a blessing when it comes to omelets/eggs.

1
366c23d69eadce094a2b22299c58a424

(2988)

on May 21, 2012
at 02:14 AM

It was a learning curve for me, but I did eventually learn to make fried eggs and omelettes in a stainless steel pan with no sticking at all. I still get some minimal sticking with scrambled eggs, but it's not that bad & it cleans up pretty easily.

Key is to get the pan pretty hot (on my gas stove, a few minutes heating at med-high), then turn the heat back down to med for a minute or two, then add the butter (lots of it), then the eggs. If you google "scrambled eggs stainless steel" you'll find lots of advice & even videos on the subject, including instructions for curing the pan with salt & fat before cooking.

366c23d69eadce094a2b22299c58a424

(2988)

on May 21, 2012
at 12:12 PM

I use about 1.5 T of butter to fry 2 eggs. I don't think of that as a huge amount, but then, I really like butter. I don't know that you need that much -- I do think the temperature of the pan before adding anything is the most important factor.

A4216f1b1e1f5ab3815bd91700905081

(1646)

on May 21, 2012
at 02:17 AM

Heh. Not strictly frying eggs in the traditional sense. That's more like making fried chicken; a big layer of fat to act as a buffer between the pan and food. Now I'm going to have to load up one of my pans with a ridiculous amount of ghee and give it a go!

61844af1187e745e09bb394cbd28cf23

(11048)

on May 21, 2012
at 03:47 AM

Blitherakt, how is that "not strictly frying eggs in the traditional sense?" I use butter, coconut oil, a combination of both, or bacon grease to fry eggs.

61844af1187e745e09bb394cbd28cf23

(11048)

on May 21, 2012
at 03:48 PM

The temperature is absolutely important! The Frugal Gourmet used to say, "Hot pan, cold oil, food won't stick!" =)

1
1f60f1aa0c74307caa8d9781a4e22b3c

(10)

on May 20, 2012
at 11:37 PM

We have had an Le Crueset enameled cast iron skillet for 5 years now. It is holding up great. It was expensive but gets daily use so for me is worth it.

1
1ea8d17bad42dc54fb7a8a178e3db309

on May 20, 2012
at 09:36 PM

Scanpan makes PFOA-free non-stick that works really well. It's kind of expensive so wait until you can get a good deal on Amazon, Ru La La (http://www.ruelala.com/), or Ideeli (http://www.ideeli.com).

782d92f4127823bdfb2ddfcbcf961d0e

(5231)

on May 20, 2012
at 10:30 PM

i've researched the pfoa's a bit and have seen complaints about chipping and losing its non-stick ability. how long have you had your pan? is the quality different than other pfoa-free pans?

1ea8d17bad42dc54fb7a8a178e3db309

(603)

on May 20, 2012
at 11:43 PM

I've had my SCanpans for a few years... I usually use a bit of coconut oil spray when making omlettes and they always are nonstick. No flaking. Love them.

0
Bb4861ae3f6eb4884125e7c251a2404c

on January 31, 2018
at 01:00 AM

Thank you for your suggestion of using a cast iron pan.  We have several, all found at Goodwill, cleaned up, then seasoned.  I would recommend you designate one pan strictly for omelettes.  Wipe the pan clean after use, don't wash unless necessary.  If you have to wash, you need to re-season.  Not a big deal.

We went to Williams Sonoma today to find an omelette pan.  One we liked in stainless steel, but it was $200.  They had a 50% off sale but on coated cookware.  We don't use anything coated.  So I guess we'lll stick with what we have.

 

0
A980a13555ef30d83a0da52761606039

on May 20, 2012
at 10:17 PM

We've had good luck with these www.orgreenicskillet.com and they are reasonably priced as well.

Answer Question


Get FREE instant access to our
Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!