5

votes

Stir fry alternatives to soy sauce?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created February 17, 2010 at 2:23 AM

What do you use? I typically throw in peppers(red bell and hot), onions, broccoli and chicken. Any sauce suggestions? I had been using gluten free teriyaki sauce, but its soy based.

9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on June 03, 2010
at 12:20 AM

Here is a recipe that uses it in cooking http://www.thehealthycookingcoach.com/2010/03/blog-post-32610i-appreciate-my-readers-clients-and-studentsthey-often-tell-me-about-new-books-products-restaurants-or-pr.html

4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1

(22923)

on June 02, 2010
at 08:58 PM

That looks great for sushi, but my understanding is it's not to be cooked with?

6b73f0c4b971e2dde7147920e329fe7f

(2041)

on February 18, 2010
at 04:19 PM

By mass, there is more wheat flour than soy flour that goes into making "soy sauce." But it sounds like Kikkoman has perfected the process so that no intact proteins remain, so it sounds safe to me.

95ab15c8ef50ff0daf87ccbdd52cd3b8

(2384)

on February 18, 2010
at 01:13 AM

Kikkoman claims that there is no detectable gluten in their standard brewed soy sauce. I have a letter from them to this effect. I have celiac, am fairly sensitive, and their sauce does not seem to bother me, though I admit that I use wheat-free tamari when larger quantities are called for. What is your source for the contention that soy sauce is "75% wheat"?

6b73f0c4b971e2dde7147920e329fe7f

(2041)

on February 17, 2010
at 03:30 PM

Normal soy sauce is about 75% wheat : 25% soy (who knows why they call it soy sauce). I imagine the only bad thing left in soy sauce after the mold, bacteria, and yeasts have been through there is gluten. Any phytoestrogens would not be present in an aqueous extract of soy, and any lectins would have been long destroyed. San-J wheat-free tamari has a good flavor, to boot.

93f44e8673d3ea2294cce085ebc96e13

(10502)

on February 17, 2010
at 06:57 AM

Gotta watch out for beef "bouillion" cubes. Usually loaded with MSG-esque ingredients i.e. not real food.

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18 Answers

6
6b73f0c4b971e2dde7147920e329fe7f

(2041)

on February 17, 2010
at 03:22 AM

Fish sauce is a flavorful, carnivorous way to add umami to foods. A bottle of it goes a long way, a spritz goes well in any dish.

4
7e1433afbb06c318c4d90860d493c49d

(5959)

on February 17, 2010
at 02:23 PM

I use San-J wheat-free tamari. I see absolutely no reason to not enjoy traditionally fermented soy in small quantities.

95ab15c8ef50ff0daf87ccbdd52cd3b8

(2384)

on February 18, 2010
at 01:13 AM

Kikkoman claims that there is no detectable gluten in their standard brewed soy sauce. I have a letter from them to this effect. I have celiac, am fairly sensitive, and their sauce does not seem to bother me, though I admit that I use wheat-free tamari when larger quantities are called for. What is your source for the contention that soy sauce is "75% wheat"?

6b73f0c4b971e2dde7147920e329fe7f

(2041)

on February 17, 2010
at 03:30 PM

Normal soy sauce is about 75% wheat : 25% soy (who knows why they call it soy sauce). I imagine the only bad thing left in soy sauce after the mold, bacteria, and yeasts have been through there is gluten. Any phytoestrogens would not be present in an aqueous extract of soy, and any lectins would have been long destroyed. San-J wheat-free tamari has a good flavor, to boot.

6b73f0c4b971e2dde7147920e329fe7f

(2041)

on February 18, 2010
at 04:19 PM

By mass, there is more wheat flour than soy flour that goes into making "soy sauce." But it sounds like Kikkoman has perfected the process so that no intact proteins remain, so it sounds safe to me.

2
E35e3d76547b18096a59c90029e7e107

(15613)

on February 17, 2010
at 08:43 PM

I use a lot of cheap (and therefore still quite tangy) balsamic vinegar, I slosh it liberally over pretty much anything, but it would doubtless work with stir fry, since it already has a sweet and sour quality (so long as it's not one of the better, thicker, sweeter ones).

2
59f7a071cec43211662e9490f12af650

on February 17, 2010
at 08:10 PM

Uwe plum sauce. Can't tell the in most dishes.

2
A89f9751a97c3082802dc0bcbe4e9208

(13978)

on February 17, 2010
at 06:09 AM

Chilean pebre, hands down. The kind I buy uses lots of cilantro. Check the ingredients list! ;)

1
9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on June 02, 2010
at 08:45 PM

4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1

(22923)

on June 02, 2010
at 08:58 PM

That looks great for sushi, but my understanding is it's not to be cooked with?

9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on June 03, 2010
at 12:20 AM

Here is a recipe that uses it in cooking http://www.thehealthycookingcoach.com/2010/03/blog-post-32610i-appreciate-my-readers-clients-and-studentsthey-often-tell-me-about-new-books-products-restaurants-or-pr.html

1
4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1

on June 02, 2010
at 02:56 PM

Coconut oil with Ginger

1
8f2bc05f4c80bbef337cdb5fccbb5471

(801)

on February 17, 2010
at 08:35 PM

Soy sauce offers the wonderful "umami" flavor, a savory, brothy, meaty taste, one of the receptors on our tongues.

A good paleo alternative is to add some earthy mushrooms to your stir fry, or perhaps to soak the mushrooms first (shitake being one to try), then adding the soak water to your wok or skillet. The mushrooms will add that elusive flavor without adding wheat or soy byproducts.

1
C150e1706e1299323591da93208e603f

on February 17, 2010
at 03:22 AM

In many cases, fish sauce (nuoc mam) will do just fine. [Edit]: oops, I see Acton beat me to it by seconds...

0
Ac1be7d044a82c85cee039f3435a550f

(150)

on May 26, 2013
at 05:49 AM

Fish sauce definitely works... Red Boat seems to be the most popular. Otherwise, you can try taking dried mushrooms, ginger, and some dried seafood of your choice (shrimp is the safest), perhaps some seaweed/konbu, toast them if necessary to remove any moisture, and blend them into powder. Use it the way restaurants use MSG powder. Makes a great sauce, together with bone broth and salt.

0
6e7a6344999f119a024f9d1bb7d2f252

on May 26, 2013
at 02:42 AM

Dr Bragg's Liquid Aminos.. it's just soy aminos.. non genetically modified.. not fermented, no gluten / etc

0
0fb8b3d6dcfb279b0f7e050d2d22510f

(4645)

on June 27, 2010
at 09:22 PM

I cook with Bones at least twice a month and make some great beef broth. I use it for all sorts of sauces and marinates. I love to pan fry and use it as a base to almost anything. I love using anything not from a package.

0
Df11e66ec4dd4f749eca409633b6a3fb

(595)

on June 27, 2010
at 06:39 PM

Don't forget sesame oil! A little mixed in with whatever other oil you use is plenty, as the flavor gets pretty dang strong. It adds a definite "Asian" flavor I haven't been able to replicate any other way.

0
C53665c3f012fa1ede91033b08a8a6e7

(2269)

on June 27, 2010
at 01:58 PM

So, products like Kikkoman are OK? I have no gluten intolerance. I don't use much soy sauce but my favorite marinade for flank and skirt steaks is 1 part soy sauce and 1 part balsamic vinegar and maybe some sesame seeds and garlic.

It sounds like all the bad things about soy and wheat are fermented out in the process. I wasn't sure Kikkoman was brewed traditionally but apparently it is.

0
6c014c15e2c5ada8e46a82bebe618da9

on June 04, 2010
at 09:30 PM

Two days ago I made a delicious chinese stir-braise (not quite fry but has the fry 'sheen')...it was flavoured with five spice powder and orange juice! I used sesame oil for the cooking oil which already delivers a delicious asian-ness to the meal and then just fried off the ingredients in orange juice (I also added the juice of a fat knob of ginger, galangal and garlic - I'll like juicing these cause if you add it to a quick stir-fry they stay too chunky n chewy). White cabbage, fennel (for that anise-y chinese flavour that matches powder), julienned carrots, pork steak cubes (enough fat they don't go dry) and fennel fronds. Next time I'll add some dried cracked up red chilli, some coriander, some sliced green onions sprinkled over the top with some coriander. Delicious! Don't discount citrus as a sauce!

0
95ab15c8ef50ff0daf87ccbdd52cd3b8

(2384)

on February 18, 2010
at 12:09 AM

I use (good) soy sauce. Real, brewed (read: fermented) soy sauce has almost none of the soy evils and (usually) little to no detectable gluten, at least according to Kikkoman's lab tests. If gluten is an issue, San-J and Eden make good wheat-free tamaris that substitute well for light Chinese soy sauce.

0
03aeff8d87a3b53a449b5b8e9158da98

(3268)

on February 17, 2010
at 02:40 PM

I also use the wheat-free tamari.
A big glass of soy milk every day would be a problem, but I think few shakes of sauce into a meal once in a while is not a big deal. I will look into fish sauce though!

-1
0637289bb4a0ab314d80fa4de627d395

(1015)

on February 17, 2010
at 02:56 AM

http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/Soy-Sauce-Substitute/Detail.aspx

"Allergic to soy or wheat? Here is a great substitute for soy sauce."

Ingredients

4 tablespoons beef bouillon 4 teaspoons balsamic vinegar 2 teaspoons dark molasses 1/4 teaspoon ground ginger 1 pinch white pepper 1 pinch garlic powder 1 1/2 cups water Directions

In a saucepan over medium heat, stir together the beef bouillon, balsamic vinegar, molasses, ginger, white pepper, garlic powder and water. Boil gently until liquid is reduced to about 1 cup, about 15 minutes.

93f44e8673d3ea2294cce085ebc96e13

(10502)

on February 17, 2010
at 06:57 AM

Gotta watch out for beef "bouillion" cubes. Usually loaded with MSG-esque ingredients i.e. not real food.

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