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Sesame Seed Oil: Good or Bad??

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created November 08, 2011 at 5:53 PM

I have been reading some paleo cookbooks that use sesame seed oil in their recipes for asian flavor. (thats what they call it anyway). I am wondering if this is something to stay away from? or if it is ok to use. If it IS something to stay away from, what would you use in substitution of it? I love the flavor of it, but do not want to use it if it is going to be bad in the long run. Thank you for your help!! It's been driving me crazy trying to decide whether to use it or not!

0b7c3e7fd96005f0b2dfd781e512fc2e

(1237)

on May 20, 2013
at 02:28 PM

The main problem people have with sesame nuts/butter/oil is omega-6 content. However not all omega-6 is equal. The more omega-6 is exposed to oxidisation or heat, the more it gets damaged. Tahini is less refined than sesame oil so the o-6 would be less harmful, but whole sesame seeds are preferable to tahini. See Mark Sisson's article here: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/nuts-omega-6-fats/

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on November 09, 2011
at 02:12 AM

Eden foods makes a *hot sesame oil* which has some spice. It's incredibly tasty. Drizzle on steaks and shit, worth the N6

A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4

(20436)

on November 08, 2011
at 08:14 PM

You only need a tiny bit for the flavor. The problem is the n6, but in small amounts from time to time, fuhgeddaboudit! (Actually, if you are dealing with any serious inflammatory issues, you might want to take a pass on it for the time being...)

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7 Answers

3
32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on November 08, 2011
at 07:19 PM

"All things are poison, and nothing is without poison; only the dose permits something not to be poisonous." -Paracelsus

While full of highly oxidizable omega-6 fatty acids, sesame seed oil is rather pungent and used in small amounts. Deleterious effects on health are mitigated by its low dose.

2
Dbe5290b790e6e2d2bd59d581d9cf164

on November 08, 2011
at 06:27 PM

I find that an issue, the whole idea of paleo, other than obviously eating like our ancestors.. Is to eat anti-inflammatory food, which are excellent for us. Simply put sesame seed, and its oil are mildly inflammatory. While Cumin, and it's seed, are mildly anti-inflammatory. I would stay away from sesame as much as possibly, although admittedly a small portion wouldn't be overly horrible for you.

www.nutritiondata.self.com will show you the inflammation scale.

www.paleofit.blogspot.com is another good site for information and updates/ recipes on the paleo lifestyle.

1
F4aff43df6a8a49a1c3879c1233ee560

(459)

on November 09, 2011
at 12:04 AM

In general I agree with a lot of the comments about small doses not being problematic. However, it generally takes a long time to finish off a bottle of of sesame seed oil, so it's not just about adding more pufa to your diet, but rather an issue of adding heavily oxidized pufa. As far as neolithic foods go, hard to get more toxic than oxidized pufa. If you're going to do it, make sure to refrigerate it to minimize oxidation.

1
13a44ea00b0c9af0b6d0f3d5f5c2cfca

(7223)

on November 08, 2011
at 07:06 PM

I don't see any problem using it in small quantities once in a while as long as you buy cold pressed, keep it refrigerated once it has been opened, and don't actually cook with it--just add it for flavor before serving.

1
77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on November 08, 2011
at 06:48 PM

Just don't use it every day.

Contrary to what some people might tell you, its actually great source of nutrients, some vitamins and bunch of health effects are attributed to it.

Its gives great taste in cooking, but you should use it cold to benefit the most of its health effects.

1
Da3d4a6835c0f5256b2ef829b3ba3393

on November 08, 2011
at 06:11 PM

Don't let it drive you crazy! If you want to use a little bit, what's wrong with that?

Please allow me to quote the great moderator Melissa:

"But why are sesame seeds not-paleo on my list and cumin is? Well, it's actually not as simple as that. As an astute reader pointed out, there is evidence that prehistoric hominids ate small amounts of seeds, grains, and even legumes. Note the small amounts- it's pretty hard to gather enough wild grains to make a rice pilaf or tahini. Personally I DO eat sesame seeds. They are a tasty garnish on raw tuna sashimi. I put maybe 10 on. In small quantities they are like cumin, which is also a flavoring/garnish. Both of these used as garnish are tasty, but probably inconsequential either way for someone with a healthy digestive system."

http://huntgatherlove.com/content/not-issue-paleo-or-not-paleo

0
Medium avatar

on November 09, 2011
at 05:55 AM

Do the same provisos ("limit consumption of things sesame") apply to sesame butter (aka tahini)? In the panoply of nut/seed butters (almond, walnut, cashew), where does sesame butter stand? Especially in terms of the inflammation issue. How does these butters rank as inflammatory agents? (And if "butter" seems a needless distraction, focus on the nuts/seeds themselves, in terms of my queries.)

0b7c3e7fd96005f0b2dfd781e512fc2e

(1237)

on May 20, 2013
at 02:28 PM

The main problem people have with sesame nuts/butter/oil is omega-6 content. However not all omega-6 is equal. The more omega-6 is exposed to oxidisation or heat, the more it gets damaged. Tahini is less refined than sesame oil so the o-6 would be less harmful, but whole sesame seeds are preferable to tahini. See Mark Sisson's article here: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/nuts-omega-6-fats/

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