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Please hack my BBQ sauce fail

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created June 11, 2012 at 6:01 AM

Now I'm not much of a chef but I can follow instructions, I attempted to make a BBQ to go with my ribs but it tastes so sweet and not at all like BBQ sauce, I used to following ingredients

23 oz Tomato Juice (1/2 Large Canorganic, Sodium free)

1/2 Large Onion- finely chopped

1/2 tbsp crushed garlic

1/2 tsp sea salt

1 tbsp chili powder

4 tbsp white vinegar

2 tbsp Extra Virgin Olive Oil

1 tsp honey

Does anyone know what I can add to it to save it for tonights dinner?

345c1755efe005edd162b770dc6fb821

(8767)

on June 15, 2012
at 09:40 PM

OMG I had no idea it had soy in there! I'm allergic to soy, but I don't use this product often but I might have blamed reactions on other things, not knowing. thanks!

A4216f1b1e1f5ab3815bd91700905081

(1646)

on June 15, 2012
at 08:14 PM

I don't get the hate about sauces... I use a dual approach, with a rub (and maybe a mop) in the smoker, and a sauce or three on the table for people to add, or not, as they wish. With pulled pork, I'd even say that an assortment of sauces is a necessity for authentic BBQ.

A4216f1b1e1f5ab3815bd91700905081

(1646)

on June 15, 2012
at 08:13 PM

Careful if you're watching soy, though. Most worcestershire sauces have it as an ingredient.

A4216f1b1e1f5ab3815bd91700905081

(1646)

on June 15, 2012
at 08:11 PM

I hadn't thought of Chipotles. Great suggestion!

Fd70d71f4f8195c3a098eda4fc817d4f

(8014)

on June 11, 2012
at 04:24 PM

I second the cumin and ACV. Both very good in BBQ sauce. (And the chipotles are a good suggestion! Pretty easy to find at most big grocery stores now too.)

61844af1187e745e09bb394cbd28cf23

(11058)

on June 11, 2012
at 03:42 PM

Read the liquid smoke labels, but I found one that didn't have caramel color in it.

Bf2291448a06d573f0fdc87cd514e512

(519)

on June 11, 2012
at 03:24 PM

Liquid smoke is some sort of witchcraft, actually. Magic probably existed in the Paleo era, so I'd say Paleo.

4ec0fe4b4aab327f7efa2dfb06b032ff

(5145)

on June 11, 2012
at 02:28 PM

I agree. Tomato juice doesn't seem right for bbq sauce.

4ec0fe4b4aab327f7efa2dfb06b032ff

(5145)

on June 11, 2012
at 02:28 PM

Isn't liquid smoke just smoke infused water?

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on June 11, 2012
at 01:24 PM

Now the question is, liquid smoke: paleo or not?

584cdd1a2dd83e46b8b76758f4c57b19

(600)

on June 11, 2012
at 09:01 AM

I'll grab some liquid smoke tomorrow. In the mean time I just added some pureed tomatoes to it and I'm using it as a bolognaise sauce

A4216f1b1e1f5ab3815bd91700905081

(1646)

on June 11, 2012
at 08:05 AM

For smokier, you can try adding a quarter teaspoon of liquid smoke, or sautéing some more onions until they're a deep brown and puréeing them into the sauce.

584cdd1a2dd83e46b8b76758f4c57b19

(600)

on June 11, 2012
at 07:48 AM

I want it to be a bit smokier (if that makes sense)

A4216f1b1e1f5ab3815bd91700905081

(1646)

on June 11, 2012
at 06:06 AM

What are you looking for, more sour, more tomato, etc?

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7 Answers

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3
345c1755efe005edd162b770dc6fb821

(8767)

on June 11, 2012
at 12:40 PM

BBQ sauce is pretty subjective to taste, but my initial thought was get rid of the tomato juice and swap out with roasted tomatoes (I like roasting, it gives more depth) or a home made ketchup.

To save it for tonight, try to add worchester sauce, that should help.

If you have a specific brand you like you might be able to replicate/tweak it: www.copykat.com

4ec0fe4b4aab327f7efa2dfb06b032ff

(5145)

on June 11, 2012
at 02:28 PM

I agree. Tomato juice doesn't seem right for bbq sauce.

345c1755efe005edd162b770dc6fb821

(8767)

on June 15, 2012
at 09:40 PM

OMG I had no idea it had soy in there! I'm allergic to soy, but I don't use this product often but I might have blamed reactions on other things, not knowing. thanks!

A4216f1b1e1f5ab3815bd91700905081

(1646)

on June 15, 2012
at 08:13 PM

Careful if you're watching soy, though. Most worcestershire sauces have it as an ingredient.

2
246ebf68e35743f62e5e187891b9cba0

(21420)

on June 11, 2012
at 02:13 PM

You can get smoked chilis if you don't mind the heat. One-two Chipotle chilis would smoke that sauce right up for you (go easy though, the chilies in Adobo can be pretty hot). Ancho chilies are mostly dried so you would have to rehydrate and grind them to be useful.

Also, roasted Cumin lends somewhat of a smokey flavor. Finally, I see vinegar and tomato in that mix, add a little bit of yellow mustard to give it more of a BBQ sauce flavor (and color).

Next time you make it, use apple cider vinegar (You'll thank me later). ACV + Mustard + Tomato + Spices = My grandmother's NC BBQ sauce recipe. Where I grew up, the chief crops were tomatoes and apples so those two ingredients have to be pretty much in everything.

Fd70d71f4f8195c3a098eda4fc817d4f

(8014)

on June 11, 2012
at 04:24 PM

I second the cumin and ACV. Both very good in BBQ sauce. (And the chipotles are a good suggestion! Pretty easy to find at most big grocery stores now too.)

A4216f1b1e1f5ab3815bd91700905081

(1646)

on June 15, 2012
at 08:11 PM

I hadn't thought of Chipotles. Great suggestion!

2
Ef9f83cb4e1826261a44c173f733789e

on June 11, 2012
at 11:40 AM

Liquid smoke is where it's at. It's the difference between bbq and spaghetti sauce. Be careful with the dosage though because it's potent.

1
11b7b7ba720a5cd43c74a0ef99a16adb

(3448)

on June 11, 2012
at 05:12 PM

Dump the sauce, go with a rub.

IMHO, the main purpose of a sauce is to cover up the taste of a poor cut of meat. Oh, you're buying good cuts of meat? Then why cover it up with a sauce?

It has been my experience that rubs tend to bring out and work with the flavor of the meat, not cover it up.

Here are a couple of rub recipes:

Memphis style rib rub:

ngredients:

1/4 cup paprika 2 tablespoons salt 2 tablespoons onion powder 2 tablespoons fresh ground black pepper 1 tablespoon cayenne Preparation:

Mix ingredients together. Store in an airtight container. Spread evenly on prepared ribs that have been patted dry and let sit until the rub appears moist.

Best odds rib rub:

Ingredients:

1/3 cup paprika 3 tablespoons dry mustard 3 tablespoons onion powder 3 tablespoons garlic powder 2 tablespoons ground basil 1 tablespoon black pepper 1 tablespoon salt 2 teaspoons red pepper (1 tablespoon if you want it hot) Preparation:

Combine all ingredients. Store in an airtight container. When applying to ribs, coat heavily and massage into the meat. If you want to make a sweet rub add 2 tablespoons of brown sugar (obviously not paleo).

There is a whole world of BBQ out there that doesn't use sauces. Why not try something new?

A4216f1b1e1f5ab3815bd91700905081

(1646)

on June 15, 2012
at 08:14 PM

I don't get the hate about sauces... I use a dual approach, with a rub (and maybe a mop) in the smoker, and a sauce or three on the table for people to add, or not, as they wish. With pulled pork, I'd even say that an assortment of sauces is a necessity for authentic BBQ.

1
Fd70d71f4f8195c3a098eda4fc817d4f

(8014)

on June 11, 2012
at 04:30 PM

George from Civilized Caveman Cooking has a great recipe:

BBQ Sauce

I've made it several times and kind of doctor it up to make it my own. I don't use the pineapple, but I add a little bit of blackstrap molasses, which gives it a kind of smokey sweetness.

Looking at this recipe vs. the ingredients you posted, it looks like maybe yours tasted a little too sweet because of the tomato juice. I've tried the recipe above with fresh tomatoes and canned fire-roasted with chilies (Muir Glen brand is DELICIOUS), and both came out great. (The only thing I would recommend is waiting until your sauce has cooled a little before putting it in the blender or food processor, unless the bowl is glass. Wouldn't want to put burning hot sauce in a plastic container.) Even better if you have a stick/immersion blender and can do it right in the pot.

1
Cf416725f639ffd1bb90764792ce7b8a

(2799)

on June 11, 2012
at 12:56 PM

BBQ varies widely depending on what part of the country it's from. The sauce you made probably tastes perfectly normal to someone somewhere.

http://www.armadillopeppers.com/bbq-sauce.html

1
A4216f1b1e1f5ab3815bd91700905081

on June 11, 2012
at 06:13 AM

Without knowing what flavor profile you're going for, here are a couple of suggestions.

If you'd like a more sour and acidic sauce, you can add something like a small sash or red wine vinegar and let it cook in for a few minutes before tasting again. Repeat until you hit the flavor, or you ruin it. :) The flavors specific to the red wine vinegar (champaign vinegar should work, too) will help cut the sweetness while adding a bit of tang to it. Simple distiller vinegar will just increase the tang, which may or may not accomplish what you want.

You can also try adding more tomato juice, or even a can of good diced tomatoes with their juice, nailing it with a stick blender until it's nice and smooth and then reducing it to the desired thickness. This should keep the flavor profile roughly the same while kicking up the tomato notes.

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