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Making your own mustard>?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created July 17, 2012 at 7:17 PM

Since there is vinegar and dye in mustard (most of it, but I am sure there are some cleaner brands) I was wondering if anyone knew how to make mustard? Technically, could I find mustard seed and put it in the food processor with apple cider vinegar and some spice?

103a639b040a17bb579084287f2a5307

(608)

on July 18, 2012
at 12:25 AM

Definitely. Dry mustard powder mixed with just enough water to make a paste... Let it sit ten minus or so, then enjoy. Just be careful, it gets really hot!

782d92f4127823bdfb2ddfcbcf961d0e

(5231)

on July 17, 2012
at 10:48 PM

I just came back from TJ and while there I checked the price...$1.69. It's a good deal for so much mustard, as a little goes a long way.

60af23519906aa54b742ffc17477c3d3

(1186)

on July 17, 2012
at 09:49 PM

I have some Candida issues, so I try to stay away from vinegar for that reason.

61844af1187e745e09bb394cbd28cf23

(11058)

on July 17, 2012
at 08:34 PM

That mustard is fantastic!

61f9349ad28e3c42d1cec58ba4825a7d

(10490)

on July 17, 2012
at 08:09 PM

I don't worry too much about it, either. My processed food intake is very low and the "natural flavors" make up such a small portion of the mustard that I don't think it's detrimental. But I still feel it's important to know as much as you can, regardless of the choice you make in the end. I agree that the "secret recipe" is likely a big part of grouping stuff under natural flavors, but I think it is also to hide ingredients that we may object to if they were listed. There's a lot of things I don't mind eating, but I want to know I'm eating them.

F5be4be097edc85690c12d67ee1a27c0

(1884)

on July 17, 2012
at 07:48 PM

Oh my! So much for researching 'natural flavors'... "Are McDonald's fries made with beef? From our Guide to Fast Food: In February 1997, McDonald's informed us by telephone that the natural flavor (see above) in their French fries is a "beef product." At that time, they declined to send us this information in writing. In July 1997, McDonald's sent us a fax stating that "[t]he natural flavor used in French fries is from an animal source.""

F5be4be097edc85690c12d67ee1a27c0

(1884)

on July 17, 2012
at 07:46 PM

I remembered that there were a few more ingredients which is why I included that I recognized all of the ingredients when reading it... I saw natural flavors too, but I didn't worry about it as it's so far down the list anyway. "Why do companies "hide" ingredients under "natural flavors"? It's considered a way of preserving the product's identity and uniqueness. Sort of like a "secret recipe" - they worry that if people knew what the flavorings were, then someone would be able to duplicate their product."

F5be4be097edc85690c12d67ee1a27c0

(1884)

on July 17, 2012
at 07:45 PM

I remembered that there were a few more ingredients which is why I included that I recognized all of the ingredients when reading it... I saw natural flavors too, but I didn't worry about it as it's so far down the list anyway. Why do companies "hide" ingredients under "natural flavors"? It's considered a way of preserving the product's identity and uniqueness. Sort of like a "secret recipe" - they worry that if people knew what the flavorings were, then someone would be able to duplicate their product.

61f9349ad28e3c42d1cec58ba4825a7d

(10490)

on July 17, 2012
at 07:37 PM

That cute French's page isn't entirely accurate - http://www.frenchs.com/products/mustard/yellow-mustard This has the full ingredient list (the link to nutritional info on the left). The "natural flavors" part is the only thing that gives me pause, because that's a really broad term that can mean anything from orange oil extract to something as weird as a vanilla flavor made from beaver testicles. That being said, I adore that yellow mustard and still happily eat it.

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9 Answers

3
97c04f87a752ff0a5cf6be9d806c0334

(888)

on July 17, 2012
at 08:01 PM

Since when is vinegar not Paleo? I think I missed the memo on that one.

I've encountered many brands of mustard that don't use yellow dye but rather turmeric powder, which is a yellow colored spice commonly used in Indian cooking. Lovely sunshine hue with some health benefits too!

60af23519906aa54b742ffc17477c3d3

(1186)

on July 17, 2012
at 09:49 PM

I have some Candida issues, so I try to stay away from vinegar for that reason.

3
782d92f4127823bdfb2ddfcbcf961d0e

on July 17, 2012
at 07:57 PM

Make your own sounds good in theory...I just don't want to be bothered by it if I can find something good. Trader Joe's sells Dijon Mustard with White Wine. The only ingredients are: water, mustard seed, vinegar, wine, salt, and citric acid. It's sinus clearing and I have enough in this (13oz) jar to last me a loooooooooong time.

782d92f4127823bdfb2ddfcbcf961d0e

(5231)

on July 17, 2012
at 10:48 PM

I just came back from TJ and while there I checked the price...$1.69. It's a good deal for so much mustard, as a little goes a long way.

61844af1187e745e09bb394cbd28cf23

(11058)

on July 17, 2012
at 08:34 PM

That mustard is fantastic!

2
07f28815a1910a2efdd4e46df3cdc6b3

on July 17, 2012
at 07:34 PM

I have a can of Colmans English Mustard Powder. You can just add water or olive oil when you need it. I find it convenient since it does not need refrigeration, the powder can be used in cooking/spice mixtures and its easy to add some vinegar and oil for a mustard vinaigrette. One 4oz can last me a least year or more.

103a639b040a17bb579084287f2a5307

(608)

on July 18, 2012
at 12:25 AM

Definitely. Dry mustard powder mixed with just enough water to make a paste... Let it sit ten minus or so, then enjoy. Just be careful, it gets really hot!

2
F5be4be097edc85690c12d67ee1a27c0

on July 17, 2012
at 07:21 PM

I saw the vinegar argument in another thread and didn't quite understand the problem with it.

French's mustard is quite pure and I recognize every ingredient.

http://www.frenchs.com/theskinnyonmustard/know-the-ingredients-html.html

But I like making my own condiments:

http://paleodietlifestyle.com/homemade-paleo-condiments/#s3

F5be4be097edc85690c12d67ee1a27c0

(1884)

on July 17, 2012
at 07:48 PM

Oh my! So much for researching 'natural flavors'... "Are McDonald's fries made with beef? From our Guide to Fast Food: In February 1997, McDonald's informed us by telephone that the natural flavor (see above) in their French fries is a "beef product." At that time, they declined to send us this information in writing. In July 1997, McDonald's sent us a fax stating that "[t]he natural flavor used in French fries is from an animal source.""

61f9349ad28e3c42d1cec58ba4825a7d

(10490)

on July 17, 2012
at 08:09 PM

I don't worry too much about it, either. My processed food intake is very low and the "natural flavors" make up such a small portion of the mustard that I don't think it's detrimental. But I still feel it's important to know as much as you can, regardless of the choice you make in the end. I agree that the "secret recipe" is likely a big part of grouping stuff under natural flavors, but I think it is also to hide ingredients that we may object to if they were listed. There's a lot of things I don't mind eating, but I want to know I'm eating them.

F5be4be097edc85690c12d67ee1a27c0

(1884)

on July 17, 2012
at 07:46 PM

I remembered that there were a few more ingredients which is why I included that I recognized all of the ingredients when reading it... I saw natural flavors too, but I didn't worry about it as it's so far down the list anyway. "Why do companies "hide" ingredients under "natural flavors"? It's considered a way of preserving the product's identity and uniqueness. Sort of like a "secret recipe" - they worry that if people knew what the flavorings were, then someone would be able to duplicate their product."

F5be4be097edc85690c12d67ee1a27c0

(1884)

on July 17, 2012
at 07:45 PM

I remembered that there were a few more ingredients which is why I included that I recognized all of the ingredients when reading it... I saw natural flavors too, but I didn't worry about it as it's so far down the list anyway. Why do companies "hide" ingredients under "natural flavors"? It's considered a way of preserving the product's identity and uniqueness. Sort of like a "secret recipe" - they worry that if people knew what the flavorings were, then someone would be able to duplicate their product.

61f9349ad28e3c42d1cec58ba4825a7d

(10490)

on July 17, 2012
at 07:37 PM

That cute French's page isn't entirely accurate - http://www.frenchs.com/products/mustard/yellow-mustard This has the full ingredient list (the link to nutritional info on the left). The "natural flavors" part is the only thing that gives me pause, because that's a really broad term that can mean anything from orange oil extract to something as weird as a vanilla flavor made from beaver testicles. That being said, I adore that yellow mustard and still happily eat it.

0
A7768b6c6be7f5d6acc76e5efa66464c

on July 18, 2012
at 02:34 PM

I've read that water extracts or develops the compound that makes mustard hot/spicy, and acid inhibits it. So if you like spicy mustard, mix the mustard powder/seeds with water first and let stand for awhile before adding anything acidic. I use the aforementioned Coleman's powder, mix with water, and let stand 10 minutes before continuing, and that seems about right for a moderate heat.

Prepared mustard loses its kick after being stored in the fridge for a long time, so I always mix up my own when I want some zing, and save the jarred mustard for cooking and sauces that are heated (which takes away the heat anyway).

0
3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on July 18, 2012
at 01:17 AM

Make your own, when starting with raw mustard seeds it's like a little science experiment. timing on the vinegar and water can completely change the flavor from spicy to mild. Then you can add other spices to make your own special mustard.

0
0242b468fe1c97997749db416c92e7ed

(4528)

on July 18, 2012
at 12:20 AM

I'm also confused as to why vinegar (and therefore, most simple mustards) wouldn't be "paleo," but if you're like me and enjoy DIY, I recommend Following My Nose's well-written instructions. (followingmynose.blogspot.com/2010/01/homemade-gourmet-mustards.html)

Heat reduces the pungency of the mustard seed, and I've found that I'll get far spicier mustard (too spicy IMO) if I marinate the seeds in the refrigerator v. at room temp. If you heat the mustard at all, you'll lose all the spiciness and the distinctive "mustard" taste.

My favorite recipe so far is:

Citrus Honey Mustard

2/3 c raw apple cider vinegar
zest of 2 organic clementines (or orange equivalent)
2 T honey
1/2-1 tsp tumeric
6 T mustard seeds

Soak the mustard seed in the vinegar in a covered bowl at room temp for several hours or up to 2 days.

Combine mustard seed and vinegar in a food processor/Vitamix. Add remaining ingredients, and process until the desired texture is reached.

Note that the flavor of your mustard will improve after it's been allowed to age for a few weeks.

0
03a4ec34751186201a56da298ac843ce

on July 18, 2012
at 12:02 AM

We make our own mustard where I used to work with just mustard powder and vinegar. Just mix and stir (and stir and stir)

0
61844af1187e745e09bb394cbd28cf23

(11058)

on July 17, 2012
at 07:21 PM

Yes. Soak the mustard seed overnight in the vinegar and add whatever spices you like. I like adding fresh garlic or horseradish.

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