3

votes

Low and slow, or high and quick?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created May 01, 2011 at 11:26 PM

Which way of cooking is more optimal and produces the least amount of toxins, and which way do you prefer?

3c997ffae3db9464325b96979346d9e9

(1290)

on May 02, 2011
at 02:04 PM

PersonMan- What I do and what you've probably read is stew meat in a crock pot or on the stove in liquid. I make great beef stews, pork stews, meat balls in tomato sauce. That said there is the topic of endogenous AGEs(produced in the body) versus exogenous (produced outside of the body as with the charbroiling of meat) as to is there a difference. If AGE production from cooking meat over an open fire is bad how could have man survived, evolved and thrived for hundreds of thousands of years? I have never read there being any potential difference in AGE production between beef and pork etc

44348571d9bc70c02ac2975cc500f154

(5853)

on May 02, 2011
at 07:46 AM

Forscher/victorinox knives are good bang for the buck, especially the meat butchering and fillet knives. http://www.foodieforums.com/vbulletin/forumdisplay.php?6-Fred-s-Cutlery-Forum is a good resource for sharpenign kitchen knives, they are as obsessed about sharpness there than we are here for nutritious food :)

Medium avatar

(5136)

on May 02, 2011
at 07:28 AM

yeah, I'm still learning how to sharpen my knives too. Once I get good with the knives I have, which are very decent but nothing special, I will buy a really great knife. I want to wait until I "hone" my sharpening skills enough not to ruin the new knife. I use mineral oil with the stone i have... How do you like the waterstones? But yes, a good knife is so helpful particularly with all the butchering a paleo eater might do

44348571d9bc70c02ac2975cc500f154

(5853)

on May 02, 2011
at 07:24 AM

Excactly, freehand sharpening is one skill that many dont know how to do. I invested to couple of japanese waterstones and i am slowly learning. I am a bit of japanese cooking knife nut, currently have one knife from Aritsugu and onther from Sakai Yusuke. Good knifes are about the best investment you can make, paleo food needs a lot of prep and with sharp knives and skills its so much fun! :) And scary, you could loose fingers with perfectly sharpened knive if you are not careful. Practically you can make them to cut rotten tomatoes by their own weight :)

Medium avatar

(5136)

on May 02, 2011
at 07:18 AM

get them razor sharp with a stone! A steel (that sword shaped thingy) is for keeping the microscopic blade teeth aligned *after* sharpening. It's not a sharpener in itself, just keeps the edge longer.

44348571d9bc70c02ac2975cc500f154

(5853)

on May 02, 2011
at 07:09 AM

and with whole fish you get the roe, and improve knife skills, which is very important paleo skill for anybody. And keep those knives razor sharp! otherwise its not easy to cut fish or meats.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on May 01, 2011
at 11:49 PM

Would you know what the 'special' relationship is between pork and AGEs? I have heard rumblings on this site about it. I have lots of pork stashed away(in the form of pig's feet and organs-liver and kidneys-that I would hate to go to waste). I boiled the 'vinegar' out of them you might say adn am concerned about the AGEs.

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3 Answers

1
44348571d9bc70c02ac2975cc500f154

(5853)

on May 02, 2011
at 07:07 AM

I prefer cheap and tasty cuts=ox tail and cheeks, means long and slow cooking to render all that collagen. But the taste is awsome. oxtail needs sometimes like 5 hours to cook at 250F. Sometimes i quickly sear some hanger steak but i prefer hearty braises to any steaks.

I eat a ton of fresh local fish when i dont have time to cook so much, fish is fast food, sometimes you dont even need to cook it. And even better fish roe. A delicacy, and the omega ratio of roe is the best i think there is, tons of omega 3, tastes great with some real smetana and dill, chives parsley!

Medium avatar

(5136)

on May 02, 2011
at 07:18 AM

get them razor sharp with a stone! A steel (that sword shaped thingy) is for keeping the microscopic blade teeth aligned *after* sharpening. It's not a sharpener in itself, just keeps the edge longer.

Medium avatar

(5136)

on May 02, 2011
at 07:28 AM

yeah, I'm still learning how to sharpen my knives too. Once I get good with the knives I have, which are very decent but nothing special, I will buy a really great knife. I want to wait until I "hone" my sharpening skills enough not to ruin the new knife. I use mineral oil with the stone i have... How do you like the waterstones? But yes, a good knife is so helpful particularly with all the butchering a paleo eater might do

44348571d9bc70c02ac2975cc500f154

(5853)

on May 02, 2011
at 07:09 AM

and with whole fish you get the roe, and improve knife skills, which is very important paleo skill for anybody. And keep those knives razor sharp! otherwise its not easy to cut fish or meats.

44348571d9bc70c02ac2975cc500f154

(5853)

on May 02, 2011
at 07:24 AM

Excactly, freehand sharpening is one skill that many dont know how to do. I invested to couple of japanese waterstones and i am slowly learning. I am a bit of japanese cooking knife nut, currently have one knife from Aritsugu and onther from Sakai Yusuke. Good knifes are about the best investment you can make, paleo food needs a lot of prep and with sharp knives and skills its so much fun! :) And scary, you could loose fingers with perfectly sharpened knive if you are not careful. Practically you can make them to cut rotten tomatoes by their own weight :)

44348571d9bc70c02ac2975cc500f154

(5853)

on May 02, 2011
at 07:46 AM

Forscher/victorinox knives are good bang for the buck, especially the meat butchering and fillet knives. http://www.foodieforums.com/vbulletin/forumdisplay.php?6-Fred-s-Cutlery-Forum is a good resource for sharpenign kitchen knives, they are as obsessed about sharpness there than we are here for nutritious food :)

1
A4f9da7d094aa72508853588682b65f7

(268)

on May 01, 2011
at 11:43 PM

I have no idea which is more optimal, but low and slow (in the slow cooker) allows me time to talk to my son after school and before tea.

1
7e746be2f0e550a8cd7df881322ae705

on May 01, 2011
at 11:33 PM

I prefer high and quick because I am IMPATIENT, but I know low and slow is better for oxidation and AGES.

Related question: http://paleohacks.com/questions/803/heat-damage-ages-and-oxidised-fat#axzz1L9A9JXBU

3c997ffae3db9464325b96979346d9e9

(1290)

on May 02, 2011
at 02:04 PM

PersonMan- What I do and what you've probably read is stew meat in a crock pot or on the stove in liquid. I make great beef stews, pork stews, meat balls in tomato sauce. That said there is the topic of endogenous AGEs(produced in the body) versus exogenous (produced outside of the body as with the charbroiling of meat) as to is there a difference. If AGE production from cooking meat over an open fire is bad how could have man survived, evolved and thrived for hundreds of thousands of years? I have never read there being any potential difference in AGE production between beef and pork etc

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on May 01, 2011
at 11:49 PM

Would you know what the 'special' relationship is between pork and AGEs? I have heard rumblings on this site about it. I have lots of pork stashed away(in the form of pig's feet and organs-liver and kidneys-that I would hate to go to waste). I boiled the 'vinegar' out of them you might say adn am concerned about the AGEs.

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