2

votes

Is there any benefit to cooking with raw milk?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created March 17, 2012 at 11:27 AM

Hello all,

I get good raw milk from a farm, and I get a lot (3 2-liter bottles is a lot when you live alone!). I drink it and I make yoghurt, but I always have lots left.

So I made some cottage cheese using the milk (which involves bringing it to a boil), and I've also been adding it to eggs, and stirring it into soups.

I wonder if here is any difference between, say, fresh cheese made using regular milk and fresh cheese made using raw milk. Boiling effectively pasteurises it, so one could think that it defeats the purpose of using raw milk in the first place. But I was wondering if it is still superior to, say, cheese made using store-bought milk because the end product is effectively a lot less processed, and from naturally-fed cows. I also wondered if the way milk is commercially processed is a lot heavier than me putting it in a pan and just bringing it to a boil before I take it off.

What do you think? Is my feel-good from making cheese with raw milk in any way justified :-D? The cheese was (note the past tense) absolutely delicious by the way. Just like what my gran made me when I was little!!!

Thanks!

Milla

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on August 28, 2013
at 04:18 AM

As a goat dairy farmer, I'm rather offended these no mention of goats in your infographic. Not only that, but you attribute chevre to sheep, when that's a goat milk product!

B9637ddb9a9a5c6a7306e3c804fcd21d

(3217)

on March 18, 2012
at 12:31 PM

Thanks for your answer! I trust my source very well, I drink the milk raw. I didn't boil it because I wanted to pasteurise it, but because the recipe I followed said you had to bring the milk to a "rolling boil" before adding lemon juice because insufficiently heated, it wouldn't curdle. I actually tried adding the juice to lightly heated milk (the temp I use when I make kefir), and it didn't work. Perhaps rennet curdles milk better at lower temperatures? I'll try that next time. Thanks for the recipe!

Ccacf7567273244733bc991af4ac42ed

(5198)

on March 18, 2012
at 04:11 AM

Pretty much goes without saying with raw milk - is the cheese-making process somehow more dangerous than just drinking it?

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on March 17, 2012
at 09:02 PM

I'd only follow that recipe if you trust your source 100%. I don't trust any source by my own two hands that much. ;)

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on March 17, 2012
at 03:30 PM

Boiling much higher than standard pasteurization, if anything it will be more damaging. Low temperature pasteurization preserves enzymatic/antibody activity while killing pathogens.

4e440818b74a00c7e913d9a8d5fe3adb

(160)

on March 17, 2012
at 03:23 PM

Boiling is pasteurization of a form, and to say that pasteurization requires a rapid rise in temperature is incorrect. Pasteurization involves holding something at a certain temperature for a certain length of time to reduce the amounts of spoilage and pathogenic organisms. You can do LHLT (low heat, long time) pasteurization at 145F for 30 minutes, standard pasteurization at 161F for 15 seconds, or even higher for even less amounts of time. At boiling temperatures (212F) it takes 0.01 seconds to pasteurize. http://milkfacts.info/Milk%20Processing/Heat%20Treatments%20and%20Pasteurization.htm

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4 Answers

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2
Ccacf7567273244733bc991af4ac42ed

on March 17, 2012
at 12:27 PM

There's no need to boil the milk to make cottage cheese. http://www.ehow.com/how_5709379_make-cottage-cheese-raw-milk.html

There's a wide range of raw cheeses I can buy, which assumes they weren't heated beyond 90F either though they have to be aged at least 60 days by law. So either way, you certainly get a fresher product and lots of good feeling from making your own cheese.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on March 17, 2012
at 09:02 PM

I'd only follow that recipe if you trust your source 100%. I don't trust any source by my own two hands that much. ;)

Ccacf7567273244733bc991af4ac42ed

(5198)

on March 18, 2012
at 04:11 AM

Pretty much goes without saying with raw milk - is the cheese-making process somehow more dangerous than just drinking it?

B9637ddb9a9a5c6a7306e3c804fcd21d

(3217)

on March 18, 2012
at 12:31 PM

Thanks for your answer! I trust my source very well, I drink the milk raw. I didn't boil it because I wanted to pasteurise it, but because the recipe I followed said you had to bring the milk to a "rolling boil" before adding lemon juice because insufficiently heated, it wouldn't curdle. I actually tried adding the juice to lightly heated milk (the temp I use when I make kefir), and it didn't work. Perhaps rennet curdles milk better at lower temperatures? I'll try that next time. Thanks for the recipe!

1
4e440818b74a00c7e913d9a8d5fe3adb

(160)

on March 17, 2012
at 03:29 PM

Your grass fed milk has benefits beyond just being raw. When you boil it, you are definitely pasteurizing it (see the pasteurization times in this page Heat Treatments and Pasteurization. If you feel compelled to pasteurize it, you can do so at a lower temperature for a longer time (145F for 30 minutes) which may be gentler on the enzymes and proteins. There are also cheeses made with raw milk so you could look into that, but of course it carries a slightly elevated level of risk.

1
3c997ffae3db9464325b96979346d9e9

on March 17, 2012
at 12:07 PM

Boiling is not the same thing as pasteurizing. It involves a specific process and includes a very rapid rise in temperature. Boiling will destroy the enzymes and some nutritients but the protein will be be more accessible or available whereas pasteurization has a denaturing effect on the protein

4e440818b74a00c7e913d9a8d5fe3adb

(160)

on March 17, 2012
at 03:23 PM

Boiling is pasteurization of a form, and to say that pasteurization requires a rapid rise in temperature is incorrect. Pasteurization involves holding something at a certain temperature for a certain length of time to reduce the amounts of spoilage and pathogenic organisms. You can do LHLT (low heat, long time) pasteurization at 145F for 30 minutes, standard pasteurization at 161F for 15 seconds, or even higher for even less amounts of time. At boiling temperatures (212F) it takes 0.01 seconds to pasteurize. http://milkfacts.info/Milk%20Processing/Heat%20Treatments%20and%20Pasteurization.htm

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on March 17, 2012
at 03:30 PM

Boiling much higher than standard pasteurization, if anything it will be more damaging. Low temperature pasteurization preserves enzymatic/antibody activity while killing pathogens.

0
89211c5307ea8c76ce082601a1c93c14

on August 28, 2013
at 01:56 AM

I recently just finished working on an infographic that explores some amazing facts concerning milk, both pasteurized and raw. I thought I would share it with you in the hopes you might make some use of it. Here's the link: http://onlinemastersinpublichealth.com/milk-matters/

Best, Jack

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on August 28, 2013
at 04:18 AM

As a goat dairy farmer, I'm rather offended these no mention of goats in your infographic. Not only that, but you attribute chevre to sheep, when that's a goat milk product!

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