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Is it possible to Cook Beef Broth Soup following this recipe for 6-8 hours, refrigerate, and then cook again another 6 hours to get the full benefit of the bones?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created February 04, 2013 at 9:35 AM

I have been following this recipe:

http://undergroundwellness.com/how-to-make-beef-bone-broth/

which asks for cooking the broth 12-24 hours. I am not usually home for that period of time unless I include sleep time. I do not want to leave the broth bones on the stove all night. I also do not like the suggestion of covering it with a towel and getting back to it. It doesn't stay warm enough and I worry about bacteria forming. May I cook the soup for 6-8 hours, cool it, and then cook it another six to eight hours the next day and get the same result (extraction of nutrients from bones)? I do not have a crock pot big enough either. Thank you!

C657d176db6f11f98aeb2a89071e3281

(842)

on February 04, 2013
at 07:49 PM

Yes, I freeze my bone broth, too. My question was actually if it is required to simmer bones for 12 to 24 hours, can it be done in two shifts (refrigerate after 6,8 hours, and then cook another 6 - 8 hours to finish the requirement). We drink our bone broth with our morning coffee so it's so nice to reach in the freezer and take out a quart for the day! That recipe above makes the best bone broth I have ever made!

C657d176db6f11f98aeb2a89071e3281

(842)

on February 04, 2013
at 07:46 PM

I appreciate your opinion. I would think that 6 hours one day and 6 to 8 hours the second day would fulfill the requirement of simmering the bones for at least twelve hours....

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3 Answers

1
7fc82eebafd44badc73c520f44660150

on February 05, 2013
at 08:19 PM

Use a pressure cooker!

Take a look at how gelatinous my broth is in just 25 minute: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xeefU9f28Cs&feature=youtube_gdata_player

The video above was 4 pounds of empire kosher chicken (cut up), 3 cups of water, for 25 minutes.

I recently made a bone broth in 75 minute with a chicken carcass, a few beef bone marrow bones, and 1 pound of chicken feet. The bones were really soft so I have every reason to think the bones imparted minerals. Clearly (visually), there is a ton of gelatin in the broths.

When I used a 12 hour slow-cooker process, I only got it to gel a little.

The pressure cooker is faster and does a better job in my opinion.

Mike

0
23f701386ac9e4ccc6767b627c5e3abf

on February 04, 2013
at 03:24 PM

Of course you can. In fact, several people, including me, freeze their bone broth soup and use it for the next few days. When you do so, none of the nutrients and minerals are lost, but stay there totally intact. But if you are adding some vegetables and other stuff, they would absorb the broth while in the refrigerator and you would have to add some more water while cooking your broth again.

C657d176db6f11f98aeb2a89071e3281

(842)

on February 04, 2013
at 07:49 PM

Yes, I freeze my bone broth, too. My question was actually if it is required to simmer bones for 12 to 24 hours, can it be done in two shifts (refrigerate after 6,8 hours, and then cook another 6 - 8 hours to finish the requirement). We drink our bone broth with our morning coffee so it's so nice to reach in the freezer and take out a quart for the day! That recipe above makes the best bone broth I have ever made!

0
Eed7dabde3d61910685845e04605267f

on February 04, 2013
at 10:07 AM

I can't see why not. Everything will be exposed to heat for the same amount of time, whether you do it in one go or not. Could be a bit of a hassle, but I can't speak of experience - on quite a few occasions I've had things cooking on a low heat overnight...

If you are concerned about bacteria flourishing bear in mind that doing it twice will necessitate cooling it twice, with all the added potential for bacteria to flourish associated with that added time. May not be as much of an issue, or a big deal at all though...

C657d176db6f11f98aeb2a89071e3281

(842)

on February 04, 2013
at 07:46 PM

I appreciate your opinion. I would think that 6 hours one day and 6 to 8 hours the second day would fulfill the requirement of simmering the bones for at least twelve hours....

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