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Information on PUFA heat oxidation

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created January 05, 2013 at 6:51 PM

Is there any detailed information on how prone to heat oxidation PUFAs are? Many paleo resources suggest that fish (as a source of PUFAs) should be cooked for a long time at lower temperatures to prevent oxidation. But will it help? As far as I know, PUFAs should be kept away even from regular room temperatures and direct sunlight which means oxidation occurs at temperatures less than low-heat cooking (e.g. steam cooking). So, what is the best way to cook fish and avoid PUFA oxidation? Or maybe it is best to eat only raw/salted fish (sushi, herring, salmon etc)?

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on January 06, 2013
at 12:00 AM

I'd say the difference in nutrition is less than one's own personal preferences.

7b4641bc7c610f2944da66f79cc3378a

(298)

on January 05, 2013
at 10:56 PM

But eating raw/salted fish is always better, right?

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2 Answers

2
32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on January 05, 2013
at 08:08 PM

Cooking fish is not the same as high-heat refining of vegetable oils. Concern over oxidizing PUFAs in whole foods is nit-picking and over-optimizing, in my opinion. I'm sure there are other areas of diet/lifestyle that need to be fixed before you need to be concerned about your fish cooking temperature.

7b4641bc7c610f2944da66f79cc3378a

(298)

on January 05, 2013
at 10:56 PM

But eating raw/salted fish is always better, right?

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on January 06, 2013
at 12:00 AM

I'd say the difference in nutrition is less than one's own personal preferences.

0
2ebed8797683eeaab992960edd1eba45

on February 02, 2013
at 11:25 PM

Most of the "hight-heat" cooking that people warn about is involving refined vegetable oils. Of course, its probably better to cook your food at lower-temperatures as bringing any kind of oil to its smoke point is probably not beneficial (at all); including the grease from beef/bacon/etc. But I do agree with Matt, worrying about the temperature that your fish is cooked at is somewhat un-prioritized thinking, as there are more fields of "paleo-nutrition" that should be examined when trying to improve ones dietary (or lifestyle) stance.

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