1

votes

How to cook meat?

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created June 03, 2011 at 3:15 AM

Grill slow cooking etc. Which is the healthiest way to cook meat?

Fe29f6658ce67c1ecc4a22e960be7498

(2997)

on June 05, 2011
at 07:11 AM

Years - *years* - ago, I did a chemistry project on Amadori Compounds. These are formed between the carbohydrates and amino acids (from the protein) in the presence of heat - a byproduct of 'browning'. They are unstable and quickly break down to a myriad other compounds many of which create some of the complex flavors in browned meat. And if there are nitrates nearby some of those complex molecules are nitrosamines - which are carcinogenic. Not really adding anything useful here, but I think it's interesting.

07ca188c8dac3a17f629dd87198d2098

(7970)

on June 03, 2011
at 03:29 PM

I grill too early in the spring and too late into fall, because it just makes everything so much more delicious. I've had to shovel snow off my deck to get to my grill before!

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25477)

on June 03, 2011
at 01:31 PM

braising lowers age and ales best

2f931662684a7747be36255c8b486228

(1049)

on June 03, 2011
at 09:57 AM

We grill a lot but personally I don't like it much since the fat drips and gets lost on the coals or wood. I prefer over a hot stone or in a cast iron skillet where it can swim in it's juices.

8b982d4beccca9fcb85affe8d4bd4ff2

(1585)

on June 03, 2011
at 07:28 AM

True that homie!

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8 Answers

best answer

6
D0501f0cc09c961a06c3d188361e7b07

on June 03, 2011
at 07:05 AM

If anyone's died from grilling meat it's because they fell into the grill. BBQ is my fave.

But I switch it up with pan frying, roasting, slow cooking, broiling, making soup, etc...

If how you cook your meat is your main concern you must be pretty damned healthy.

2f931662684a7747be36255c8b486228

(1049)

on June 03, 2011
at 09:57 AM

We grill a lot but personally I don't like it much since the fat drips and gets lost on the coals or wood. I prefer over a hot stone or in a cast iron skillet where it can swim in it's juices.

8b982d4beccca9fcb85affe8d4bd4ff2

(1585)

on June 03, 2011
at 07:28 AM

True that homie!

1
A5ead9de259ae72f2165ecb12f4ae764

(440)

on June 03, 2011
at 02:28 PM

I just picked up an outdoor BBQ grill and I can't stop grilling! Grilling is the best, and that's my final (subjective) answer.

07ca188c8dac3a17f629dd87198d2098

(7970)

on June 03, 2011
at 03:29 PM

I grill too early in the spring and too late into fall, because it just makes everything so much more delicious. I've had to shovel snow off my deck to get to my grill before!

1
B3e7d1ab5aeb329fe24cca1de1a0b09c

(5242)

on June 03, 2011
at 04:10 AM

This is all somewhat up in there air, there doesn't seem to be anything conclusive one way or the other. However based on the current research it is somewhat agreed on in the literature the healthiest way to cook meat is slowly with low heat.

This avoids 'browning' the meat, as you might when you sear it on a grill, which produces Advanced Glycation End-product's (AGE's) - this all happens to make it taste better :). AGE's possibly affect 'age-related' illnesses, and I'm sure I read somewhere about it possibly affecting cancer - though this very moment I can't find a reference.

The AGE 'process' occurs naturally in the body as part of the normal metabolic process, and some think that external AGE's such as those from cooking, may have no negative affects to health.

So, nothing conclusive as far as I'm aware, but hopefully that points you in the right direction.

Fe29f6658ce67c1ecc4a22e960be7498

(2997)

on June 05, 2011
at 07:11 AM

Years - *years* - ago, I did a chemistry project on Amadori Compounds. These are formed between the carbohydrates and amino acids (from the protein) in the presence of heat - a byproduct of 'browning'. They are unstable and quickly break down to a myriad other compounds many of which create some of the complex flavors in browned meat. And if there are nitrates nearby some of those complex molecules are nitrosamines - which are carcinogenic. Not really adding anything useful here, but I think it's interesting.

1
6f2c00fcbf48c69f0ea212239b3e1178

on June 03, 2011
at 03:17 AM

What kind of meat?

0
9a5e2da94ad63ea3186dfa494e16a8d1

on June 03, 2011
at 02:50 PM

Nourishing Traditions has some commentary on the healthiest way to cook meat. Grilling does produce some carcinogens. Hey everything gives you cancer according to Joe Jackson. But if you're worried about that kind of thing, you shouldn't grill all of your meat, and/or eat immune-boosting foods with grilled meats (Nourishing Traditions recommends fermented vegetables). You should also take care not to blacken/burn too much of it.

They also recommend low-heat cooking such as braising, which doesn't destroy as many nutrients or produce as many "off" compounds.

I personally don't worry about this too much, I really only grill in the warmer weather months and then once or twice a week. I cook meat primarily with the optimal preparation for culinary reasons, which I think is close enough to optimal nutrition for me. Certain beef cuts (rib eye, porterhouse, hangar, etc) are great on the grill, others (flank, shoulder) are best braised or in stews, though you can grill flank if you are quick about it. Lamb works on the grill, roasted, braised, or heck just rubbed all over my body and eaten raw (just kidding, sort of...).

I think that all red meats (beef, lamb, etc) should be cooked rare to medium rare. It should still be red/pink in the middle, this leaves more nutrients in the meat, tastes better, and it is more satisfying. I also think that meat can be eaten raw if properly prepared, which I think is also good for nutrition and for your gut.

0
44348571d9bc70c02ac2975cc500f154

(5853)

on June 03, 2011
at 09:06 AM

i use sous vide for salmon and steak (hanger steak or skirt steak), and traditional braising for cheeks and ox tail. Sometimes i am too lazy to sear steak after sous vide (to avoid the smoke in morning). Not much flavor without a good sear, but cant be very unhealthy since the meat is cooked only up to 55C themperature.

0
1a98a40ba8ffdc5aa28d1324d01c6c9f

(20378)

on June 03, 2011
at 05:47 AM

Crockpot is nice.

I sometimes boil Chicken breasts in a pan. No oil and also low heat.. Fast (about 15 min)

0
64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on June 03, 2011
at 04:37 AM

Like with rotating vegetables to avoid buildup of any toxins, seems like rotating cooking methods would be a good idea. Cooking on a skillet, slow cooking, baking... I doubt grilling would be very good though.

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