0

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How do you use dry rubs?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created June 03, 2012 at 4:01 AM

Bought some nice dry rubs but they burn quickly on the grill. Suggestions?

A4216f1b1e1f5ab3815bd91700905081

(1646)

on June 04, 2012
at 02:36 AM

Thanks! It's my "go-to" reference when I fire up the smoker.

Medium avatar

(19479)

on June 04, 2012
at 01:09 AM

Nice response and thanks for the link to "smoke and spice"!

61844af1187e745e09bb394cbd28cf23

(11058)

on June 04, 2012
at 12:26 AM

Love it, Truth!

Medium avatar

(19479)

on June 03, 2012
at 07:58 PM

Totally appropriate in this context.

76026e8ef496039d5075440ff731aa0d

(5386)

on June 03, 2012
at 06:30 PM

This is something as a dude I normally wouldn’t say to, you know, another dude...I would dislocate my jaw like an anaconda to swallow your meat and suck that bone as though it had the cure for cancer...it looks that tasty to me... Truth.

76026e8ef496039d5075440ff731aa0d

(5386)

on June 03, 2012
at 06:14 PM

@MathGirl72 - you need Tongs an Ove' Glove and some Neosporin..for...colour?

61844af1187e745e09bb394cbd28cf23

(11058)

on June 03, 2012
at 04:03 PM

How do you add a dry RUB near the end of cooking?

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on June 03, 2012
at 12:15 PM

I coat pretty much any meat that I cook in the oven in some dry rub before cooking. Some mix of a variety of peppers, salt, cumin, cilantro, fennel seed, curry powder, etc. I use this on chicken breast, fish, pork tenderloins.

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5 Answers

5
518bce04b12cd77741237e1f61075194

(11577)

on June 03, 2012
at 01:05 PM

Dry rubs are just that- literally meant to be generously rubbed on when the meat is dry. They are applied before cooking, otherwise that ain't a dry rub. Use a bit of paper towel to pat dry, especially if recently defrosted, so you will get better adhesion. Generously coat with dry rub. If you bought them and you find that they are burning on the grill, they probably have a sugar content- not a big deal, sugar is an important component of rubs that really makes a huge part of the BBQ flavour. I add brown sugar when I make my own- it's only a small amount in the grand scheme. The sugar is there to help create grill marks- this means a hot, open grill resulting in a rare steak with nice colouring. If you aren't a fan of grill marks, or are having a hard time maintaining them without burning, you could make your own dry rubs and exclude the sugar so that it is no longer an issue. Keep in mind you might have to adjust other flavours to taste!

4
Medium avatar

(19479)

on June 03, 2012
at 06:25 PM

I use dry rubs on meat that is either going to be slow cooked or smoked.

Generously coat the meat the night before, put it in the fridge, and the next day it is ready for the crock pot or the smoker.

The picture below is of a pork shoulder (I'm pulling out the shoulder blade prior to "pulling" the pork itself)...

how-do-you-use-dry-rubs?

(full recipe here)

76026e8ef496039d5075440ff731aa0d

(5386)

on June 03, 2012
at 06:30 PM

This is something as a dude I normally wouldn’t say to, you know, another dude...I would dislocate my jaw like an anaconda to swallow your meat and suck that bone as though it had the cure for cancer...it looks that tasty to me... Truth.

Medium avatar

(19479)

on June 03, 2012
at 07:58 PM

Totally appropriate in this context.

1
A4216f1b1e1f5ab3815bd91700905081

on June 04, 2012
at 12:14 AM

Dry rubs are, generally, used as a coating for smoking. The "low and slow" nature of hardwood smoking lends to the formation of what's called "bark" in the BBQ world. Smoking meats between 200 and 230 Fahrenheit for hours and hours prevents the burning of the rub. Higher temperatures tend to, as other posters have described, burn the sugar in the rub.

If you want to dig into smoking, BBQ, and dry rubs, I'd recommend taking a look at "Smoke and Spice" (http://amzn.com/1558322620), one of the best smoking guides I've read.

Medium avatar

(19479)

on June 04, 2012
at 01:09 AM

Nice response and thanks for the link to "smoke and spice"!

A4216f1b1e1f5ab3815bd91700905081

(1646)

on June 04, 2012
at 02:36 AM

Thanks! It's my "go-to" reference when I fire up the smoker.

0
246ebf68e35743f62e5e187891b9cba0

(21430)

on June 03, 2012
at 08:49 PM

I have a rub I put on my steaks, powdered ginger and onion powder is awesome with a little salt and pepper.

0
01adafcb4dd4147c6af543f61eee60a8

on June 03, 2012
at 10:42 AM

I add them near the end of cooking

61844af1187e745e09bb394cbd28cf23

(11058)

on June 03, 2012
at 04:03 PM

How do you add a dry RUB near the end of cooking?

61844af1187e745e09bb394cbd28cf23

(11058)

on June 04, 2012
at 12:26 AM

Love it, Truth!

76026e8ef496039d5075440ff731aa0d

(5386)

on June 03, 2012
at 06:14 PM

@MathGirl72 - you need Tongs an Ove' Glove and some Neosporin..for...colour?

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