1

votes

Gentlest way to cook meat

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created January 18, 2012 at 1:23 AM

What is the gentlest way to cook meat? I try to cook my food in the gentlest way possible, but I am not really sure what is best when it comes to cooking meat. Thanks!

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on September 07, 2013
at 01:28 AM

I know next to nothing about cooking so I'm sorry if this question sounds stupid. Is steaming done by suspending the meat in say a colander or sieve over a pan of boiling water and with a lid on top?

Medium avatar

(2923)

on January 19, 2012
at 04:11 AM

Oh, and as KillerAbsMtn mentions, yes, sous vide is gentler -- albeit a little tricker :p The advantage of steaming and boiling is the broth that gets created in the process.

Medium avatar

(2923)

on January 19, 2012
at 04:09 AM

The colander way works best for westerners. If you have an Asian grocery store nearby, you can pick up a set of bamboo steamers (a series of bamboo trays with a lid) that will work just fine in a pan (no need to get a wok).

0df0b1c6ae16bbb75b4a5efa3d876765

(2240)

on January 18, 2012
at 06:44 AM

+1 on using a crockpot. I've gotten into a routine where I fix breakfast/lunch for my first meal of the day while at the same time putting dinner in the crockpot for later. The simplicity of cooking this way allows me the ability to experiment with different flavors and seasonings, which is good since I'm still learning how to cook. Also keeps the house smelling good.

Ebb10603524dd22621c1155dd7ddf106

(19150)

on January 18, 2012
at 03:23 AM

Sous Vide is definitely the gentlest method. The requisite use of plastic bags freaks me out though, so I never built my home-made sous vide contraption. ;-)

D5d982a898721d3392c85f951d0bf0aa

(2417)

on January 18, 2012
at 02:44 AM

Out of curiosity, why cook your meat gently?

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3 Answers

3
1a98a40ba8ffdc5aa28d1324d01c6c9f

(20378)

on January 18, 2012
at 01:28 AM

Crockpot or boil/poach or oven.

0df0b1c6ae16bbb75b4a5efa3d876765

(2240)

on January 18, 2012
at 06:44 AM

+1 on using a crockpot. I've gotten into a routine where I fix breakfast/lunch for my first meal of the day while at the same time putting dinner in the crockpot for later. The simplicity of cooking this way allows me the ability to experiment with different flavors and seasonings, which is good since I'm still learning how to cook. Also keeps the house smelling good.

2
F77c6462cf6596fe6dabeeb5931821ab

(365)

on January 18, 2012
at 01:45 AM

Ebb10603524dd22621c1155dd7ddf106

(19150)

on January 18, 2012
at 03:23 AM

Sous Vide is definitely the gentlest method. The requisite use of plastic bags freaks me out though, so I never built my home-made sous vide contraption. ;-)

2
Medium avatar

(2923)

on January 18, 2012
at 01:29 AM

With water basically: Steaming, then Poaching, then Stewing. Then mix of moisture and radiant heat (Braising). Then the radiant heat methods: Roasting, then Grilling.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on September 07, 2013
at 01:28 AM

I know next to nothing about cooking so I'm sorry if this question sounds stupid. Is steaming done by suspending the meat in say a colander or sieve over a pan of boiling water and with a lid on top?

Medium avatar

(2923)

on January 19, 2012
at 04:09 AM

The colander way works best for westerners. If you have an Asian grocery store nearby, you can pick up a set of bamboo steamers (a series of bamboo trays with a lid) that will work just fine in a pan (no need to get a wok).

Medium avatar

(2923)

on January 19, 2012
at 04:11 AM

Oh, and as KillerAbsMtn mentions, yes, sous vide is gentler -- albeit a little tricker :p The advantage of steaming and boiling is the broth that gets created in the process.

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