4

votes

Failed at making bone broth

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created November 02, 2011 at 2:22 PM

Hey.

I really need help. I have watched several videos on how to make it-seems so easy, but not the case in reality

SO i bought soup bones.Heres what i did:

1.Put water in a pan, added salt 2.Then i added the bones (my pan/pot is too small, so the bones were not totally covered with the water 3.Let it boil for a couple of hours-nothing happened 4.Went to the shop and bought apple vinegar and added it 5.Let it boil for another couple of hours 6. Turned up the heat occaasionally to see if anything changes

I gave up.And i ate the minimal amounts of meat the were, and i got small pieces of cartilage too.

COuld it be that the bones were not the right type???

Yesterday i tried with different bones aswell..still nothing, although i didn't put salt and vinegar then.

Is it about the timing or smth, cause i really want some bone broth :(

84c1b9e79af530d5bd93e088f226c9a4

(95)

on April 27, 2012
at 12:41 AM

+1 for roasting the bones...that's recommended for most Pho recipes too, and we know that tastes delicious :)

5d5732f693afb35fa8755b032e75b6d6

on November 03, 2011
at 05:45 PM

Yeah - or ask a neighbor/friend/family member. Tons of these things are probably collecting dust in a basement or cupboard near you.

13a44ea00b0c9af0b6d0f3d5f5c2cfca

(7223)

on November 03, 2011
at 01:16 PM

A slow cooker isn't necessary for broth making. But, if you want one, they are often available at thrift shops and garage sales at very low prices.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on November 03, 2011
at 01:43 AM

Electric or crockpot here. As convenient as crockpots are, mine is from the early 1970s and doesn't have a removable pot, so cleaning is a major pain. I prefer a stovetop pot.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on November 03, 2011
at 01:41 AM

All my broths go into soups. Don't particularly like having droplets of oil floating there.

27e79ef3308bb5f2d7bd04ee7eea7b79

(2038)

on November 02, 2011
at 09:09 PM

I just got home from work, picked up the bowl, and there was a definite jiggle! I need to be more patient, or I need a new refrigerator. Either way, I'm happy now!

41dfb1a4fecb38d24075ff52f13ccb28

on November 02, 2011
at 08:44 PM

Maybe these instructions can help you? They are how I usually do it. Stock pot: http://grainfreediet.blogspot.com/2011/06/how-to-make-bone-broth-in-stock-pot.html Crock pot: http://grainfreediet.blogspot.com/2011/07/how-to-make-bone-broth-in-crock-pot.html

145d4b0f988af15acc6b26eccc1f4895

(1932)

on November 02, 2011
at 07:01 PM

Upvote for the heavenly light and angelic chorus :-) I can only agree with what others have said, no new info here!

Aa69579f867333b08158c70e25f7daf1

(1826)

on November 02, 2011
at 06:56 PM

Yes, get a crockpot!

24df4e0d0e7ce98963d4641fae1a60e5

on November 02, 2011
at 05:33 PM

I have no clue then barefeet! Sorry :(

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on November 02, 2011
at 05:28 PM

I don't remove the fat. You need fat to make gravy or sauce, which is what I use most of my broth for. If you remove the fat, you'll need to replace it which is maybe what you do? Even when I use mine as broth I leave the fat in because it's partly marrow.

27e79ef3308bb5f2d7bd04ee7eea7b79

(2038)

on November 02, 2011
at 05:27 PM

Evelyn, I did just that - crockpot full of bones/cartilage filled with water and a bit of apple cider vinegar all day. Strained it and put the liquid in the fridge. It's been 20 hours and there's no jello at all. I guess I got something wrong too.

Ce7e28769d92d5de5533e775b1de966e

on November 02, 2011
at 05:02 PM

Nice! Might be a weird question but do you use a gas stove or an electric? I find that due to my gas stove I have to be so careful with maintaining the heat, will burn like a mofo in an instant, that I have to go lower on the temp so longer on the stove.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on November 02, 2011
at 04:35 PM

Getting meat jello can take a while, but I've gotten in much short time. Depends on what bones you're using, how much cartilage is around, etc... It's pretty easy to get chicken jello in 2-3 hours in my experience. My pork bone broth took 5 hours and only came out semi-set when cooled, though I didn't have a lot of bones to start with and no connective tissue.

3dc940ac9be21e45cf83207814c8cd46

(544)

on November 02, 2011
at 03:50 PM

Yes to the above. Also, let the broth cook for many hours. I have done this for 24 hours in the oven, in a roasting pan. A crock pot, though, is the best!

Ce7e28769d92d5de5533e775b1de966e

on November 02, 2011
at 03:20 PM

You can totally re-use those, just realize that every time you reuse, the broth will be different - they do wear out :) Here, I found this for you, it's really good: thenourishinggourmet.com/2011/09/…

Ce7e28769d92d5de5533e775b1de966e

on November 02, 2011
at 03:19 PM

You can totally re-use those, just realize that every time you reuse, until they fall apart, the broth will be different. Here, I found this for you: http://www.thenourishinggourmet.com/2011/09/bone-broth-take-frugal-to-a-new-level.html

F31bf239a8f966ba352afd1260556cf5

(115)

on November 02, 2011
at 03:09 PM

One question related... is it possible to cook bones again after having had it with meat for dinner... or is the "stuff" already out of the bones in the first cooking (broiled in owen, boiled in water etc..). Im just wondering since I normally have f.ex. lamb meat on bones and throw them away after meal.

93ae9f2d376e5426e891a9b58d8302fa

(2936)

on November 02, 2011
at 03:00 PM

I'll join the slow-cooker chorus. When it's slow-cooked, all the gristle and yuck becomes ambrosia. I'm not big on broth, but the chunks of gunk in it are heavenly.

9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on November 02, 2011
at 02:27 PM

you should get a crock pot. No fail every time. It's hard to keep things at the right temp otherwise.

B9cc28905ec54389c47cde031d709703

on November 02, 2011
at 02:26 PM

What exactly are you looking for to know it was done right or not?

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12 Answers

7
77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on November 02, 2011
at 02:40 PM

Perhaps you were looking for the gelatin to appear. Take your "failed" experiment and put it into the fridge. You may be surprised,

7
32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on November 02, 2011
at 02:38 PM

What did you expect to happen when you made it? A light from heaven and an angelic chorus?

I'm thinking it was probably just fine, but you didn't finish the prep. Let it cool slightly, sieve it to remove bones/herbs/veg you might have included and then refrigerate until cold. The fat will be on top, and the broth will likely form a gel. Remove the fat and heat up the gel to get back broth.

145d4b0f988af15acc6b26eccc1f4895

(1932)

on November 02, 2011
at 07:01 PM

Upvote for the heavenly light and angelic chorus :-) I can only agree with what others have said, no new info here!

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on November 03, 2011
at 01:41 AM

All my broths go into soups. Don't particularly like having droplets of oil floating there.

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on November 02, 2011
at 05:28 PM

I don't remove the fat. You need fat to make gravy or sauce, which is what I use most of my broth for. If you remove the fat, you'll need to replace it which is maybe what you do? Even when I use mine as broth I leave the fat in because it's partly marrow.

3
1d69e0750eff4463ccb623ff5ca0486f

on November 02, 2011
at 02:43 PM

I find that the temperature is key - bring the contents to the boil and then turn it way down - generally all stock recipes recommend the same

3
Ce7e28769d92d5de5533e775b1de966e

on November 02, 2011
at 02:42 PM

you're looking for that nice bouncy jello texture when chilled, right? 'cause that means it is damn chock full of the amino acids, collagen, calcium, minerals. it takes a long time to get this result and definitely falls into the "turtle or hare" category - bone broth is the turtle - slow and steady. you have to allow it to cool in the fridge to get that texture, happens when it cools down, and will return to a nice broth state when heated.

i don't frequent this site but i like that the steps are easy and are broken down appropriately and easily for anyone to be successful at making tasty bone broth. if you have wine kicking about you can use that in place of vinegar as well. i pretty much do 2lbs of bones, i also roast them before making the broth for a richer flavour, 2tb of the acid, and then simmer. pretty much all day for beef bones and then about 3-4 hours for pork and lamb bones. any scum that rises to the surface i skim off. i do strain through my chinoise when done for a smooth consistency.

you'll get it :) good luck!

F31bf239a8f966ba352afd1260556cf5

(115)

on November 02, 2011
at 03:09 PM

One question related... is it possible to cook bones again after having had it with meat for dinner... or is the "stuff" already out of the bones in the first cooking (broiled in owen, boiled in water etc..). Im just wondering since I normally have f.ex. lamb meat on bones and throw them away after meal.

Ce7e28769d92d5de5533e775b1de966e

on November 02, 2011
at 05:02 PM

Nice! Might be a weird question but do you use a gas stove or an electric? I find that due to my gas stove I have to be so careful with maintaining the heat, will burn like a mofo in an instant, that I have to go lower on the temp so longer on the stove.

Ce7e28769d92d5de5533e775b1de966e

on November 02, 2011
at 03:19 PM

You can totally re-use those, just realize that every time you reuse, until they fall apart, the broth will be different. Here, I found this for you: http://www.thenourishinggourmet.com/2011/09/bone-broth-take-frugal-to-a-new-level.html

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on November 02, 2011
at 04:35 PM

Getting meat jello can take a while, but I've gotten in much short time. Depends on what bones you're using, how much cartilage is around, etc... It's pretty easy to get chicken jello in 2-3 hours in my experience. My pork bone broth took 5 hours and only came out semi-set when cooled, though I didn't have a lot of bones to start with and no connective tissue.

Ce7e28769d92d5de5533e775b1de966e

on November 02, 2011
at 03:20 PM

You can totally re-use those, just realize that every time you reuse, the broth will be different - they do wear out :) Here, I found this for you, it's really good: thenourishinggourmet.com/2011/09/…

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on November 03, 2011
at 01:43 AM

Electric or crockpot here. As convenient as crockpots are, mine is from the early 1970s and doesn't have a removable pot, so cleaning is a major pain. I prefer a stovetop pot.

2
24df4e0d0e7ce98963d4641fae1a60e5

on November 02, 2011
at 04:04 PM

Hi Lily,

I agree with the others, ya gotta let it cool. Even when you make Jello, it takes a while in the fridge before it sets up.

I have wonderful luck with pork shoulder bones. When I tried this the first time I thought it was going to be a bust. I do take a hammer to them ;) But the broth seemed awfully clear and thin. Then I put it into a 2L soda bottle when at room temp to put in fridge (this is not how I normally store it but I had a lot and couldn't find my usual container(s). The next day I literally had to squeeze gloops out of it!

When I make chicken broth I use more carcass -- e.g. more cartilage and the skin goes in there too. This makes a very cloudy broth so I see some "success" when warm. But still no gel love until cooled overnight.

A slow cooker may be easy, but I've had no problems simmering on the stove. You DO need a bigger pot though.

24df4e0d0e7ce98963d4641fae1a60e5

on November 02, 2011
at 05:33 PM

I have no clue then barefeet! Sorry :(

27e79ef3308bb5f2d7bd04ee7eea7b79

(2038)

on November 02, 2011
at 09:09 PM

I just got home from work, picked up the bowl, and there was a definite jiggle! I need to be more patient, or I need a new refrigerator. Either way, I'm happy now!

27e79ef3308bb5f2d7bd04ee7eea7b79

(2038)

on November 02, 2011
at 05:27 PM

Evelyn, I did just that - crockpot full of bones/cartilage filled with water and a bit of apple cider vinegar all day. Strained it and put the liquid in the fridge. It's been 20 hours and there's no jello at all. I guess I got something wrong too.

1
D662eb6ff866270fcfd08a41dfb1304a

on July 21, 2012
at 01:15 PM

I have read that the older crockpots are not safe - they have lead in the glaze which can leach out while cooking. So go online and research your model to see if it contains lead.

1
Ca1150430b1904659742ce2cad621c7d

(12540)

on November 02, 2011
at 06:53 PM

I've occasionally had my broth not 'gel' -- usually when I used too much water for my bones -- if your bones weren't submerged, it would be like not having enough bones for the amount of water you used.

Unlike most of the folk here, I make my broth on a stovetop, not in a slow-cooker. There are a couple of things you can do to make sure your broth comes out the way you want if you're cooking on the stovetop.

  1. Invest in one of these (http://preview.tinyurl.com/3wntugq). It's a heat diffuser, which allows you to get a much lower heat under your pot.
  2. Invest in a medium sized stock pot or dutch oven -- you need to be able to get those bones covered with water.
  3. Prepare to simmer it a LONG time over low heat. I typically cook mine for 24-36 hours
  4. Strain and cool before serving.

I cook my bones through several rounds of this, and typically only take the fat off of mine after the 1st round, leaving it in for later rounds, but to each their own -- some folk like theirs skimmed, and that's OK too.

0
Bd3096de687a11d3e665434b80ad0926

(0)

on August 16, 2012
at 04:20 PM

.. wondering if someone can advise:

I have made 3 batches of bone-broth, so far.

2 first batches, made with chicken feet and necks (~1 lb) and water (~1 qt), easy, great result- after cooling, I ended up with pale, jelled broth.

my 3rd/last batch, I used beef for the first time- a knuckle bone. again, ~1 lb bone and ~1 qt water (I have a tiny 1.5 qt crockpot). the only difference, now that I think of it, is I kept topping off the broth- which I left on "Low" for 48 hrs- with hot water every time the level dropped an inch, or so, from the top of the crockpot.

after it cooled, I removed a 1/4 inch layer of fat- easy- but the remaining broth stayed liquid. it's a nice amber color- tastes fine. but no jelling occured.

any advice ? !? is it simply a question of too much water-- or am I missing something ?

thanks in advance for any feedback.

0
19ff515e8ec02d95e8f2cf68c3ec1373

(1207)

on July 21, 2012
at 07:00 PM

Don't boil, barely a simmer. Roast the bones first. NO VINEGAR EVER

Slow cookers can get too hot even on low.

Follow these instructions for awesomeness with regards to broth.

http://ruhlman.com/2009/01/veal-stock-and-remouillage/

0
E644cb0db27318ceda19322f59f0b9c3

(165)

on November 03, 2011
at 11:05 AM

Thank you people.Putting it the fridge was a succes, too bad i poured it over with large amounts of salt trying to get it to become jelly like while heating ! :D

No money for crock pots :/

13a44ea00b0c9af0b6d0f3d5f5c2cfca

(7223)

on November 03, 2011
at 01:16 PM

A slow cooker isn't necessary for broth making. But, if you want one, they are often available at thrift shops and garage sales at very low prices.

5d5732f693afb35fa8755b032e75b6d6

on November 03, 2011
at 05:45 PM

Yeah - or ask a neighbor/friend/family member. Tons of these things are probably collecting dust in a basement or cupboard near you.

0
13a44ea00b0c9af0b6d0f3d5f5c2cfca

(7223)

on November 02, 2011
at 05:57 PM

I've never gotten jelled broth from chicken bones--even after cooking overnight and cooling for a couple of days. However, it still tastes great. I've heard adding chicken feet will help, but I don't have a good source for those and I can't really get past the ick factor of the feet.

However, I don't have much trouble with beef/pork bones. One question: did you roast the meat/bones first? I doubt it makes any difference in jelling, but it does improve the flavor.

84c1b9e79af530d5bd93e088f226c9a4

(95)

on April 27, 2012
at 12:41 AM

+1 for roasting the bones...that's recommended for most Pho recipes too, and we know that tastes delicious :)

0
E644cb0db27318ceda19322f59f0b9c3

(165)

on November 02, 2011
at 03:56 PM

Yes i was waiting it to become jelly like, but it stayed completely liquid. It should become at least a little solid after 5 hours , at least in the videos it was already.I guess i'll just put it in the fridge and see what happens

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