1

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Egg Allergy Anyone?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created September 23, 2010 at 5:04 PM

I've been dealing with some allergic responses: A lot of gunk in my throat, stuffy nose; just general congestion type stuff. I've never had allergies, and I have lived in the same area for years. I've been eliminating foods I think may have been the culprit, and it looks like it might be eggs! HUGE BUMMER! Eggs are so cheap, delicious, and quick! Any ideas for something fast and easy I can replace those calories with?

Cc69a51b427eaad36251cce9dcca4d3a

(1074)

on December 29, 2011
at 11:35 AM

foreman grill! :P

Cc69a51b427eaad36251cce9dcca4d3a

(1074)

on December 29, 2011
at 11:35 AM

foreman grill ftw!

4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1

(22923)

on September 26, 2010
at 03:23 PM

I wonder how many of this type of allergy are tied to leaky gut...

A8d95f3744a7a0885894ee0731c9744c

(3761)

on September 24, 2010
at 12:31 PM

I have tried fresh pastured eggs :-/ It's a total bummer. They're one of my fav foods.

8564091e3cf82ea53843c0dbcf57857a

(990)

on September 23, 2010
at 07:54 PM

To add to that, try having the yolks raw.

A8d95f3744a7a0885894ee0731c9744c

(3761)

on September 23, 2010
at 05:23 PM

Brilliant! That sounds great!

  • A8d95f3744a7a0885894ee0731c9744c

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7 Answers

5
A89f9751a97c3082802dc0bcbe4e9208

(13978)

on September 23, 2010
at 05:09 PM

I'm dealing with a similar thing right now.

I replaced eggs with broiled chicken drumsticks. Yum! I've become slightly addicted to them. The nutritional profile is different so I've been drinking diluted coconut milk with them.

Place drumsticks in broiler-friendly pan (I use a cast iron skillet). Sprinkle with preferred seasoning. Broil for 10 minutes. Flip. Broil for another 10 minutes. Enjoy!

Be sure to lick the pan! ;)

Also, when I'm able to use pastured chicken, I make a broth out of the bones after...

A8d95f3744a7a0885894ee0731c9744c

(3761)

on September 23, 2010
at 05:23 PM

Brilliant! That sounds great!

Cc69a51b427eaad36251cce9dcca4d3a

(1074)

on December 29, 2011
at 11:35 AM

foreman grill! :P

Cc69a51b427eaad36251cce9dcca4d3a

(1074)

on December 29, 2011
at 11:35 AM

foreman grill ftw!

3
5672b2d190891342389e764cc4056ca9

(1304)

on September 24, 2010
at 09:59 AM

Replace eggs with mince meat (lamb, beef, chicken, turkey), add fats, herbs, and your favorite veggies. Mince meat is usually cheaper, and cooks in just a few minutes. You can stir fry, steam, or roast it; or make meat balls and cook them in soups, sauces of many kinds, or just fry.

There is a very interesting website on rotation diet for children with allergies: the food discussed is not paleo, but the principles are sound. This is the link (follow also the two links at the bottom of the page):

http://www.parentsofallergicchildren.org/rotation.htm

In a nutshell, this is how I rotate my food: I wait a few days (3 or 4) before eating the same meat/fish again. So, if I eat lamb on Monday, I will eat it again on Friday or Saturday (I'd rather freeze the leftovers than eating the same thing the day after). I also divide proteins into categories like "mammals", "poultry", and "fish" and try to alternate them. It might sound a little exaggerated, but this method actually makes planning my meals much easier. Of course I need to make exceptions from time to time, but I'm extra careful with foods like eggs and shrimps. Luckily, there is no need to worry too much about fats and veggies

3
9bc6f3df8db981f67ea1465411958c8d

on September 23, 2010
at 05:15 PM

Try discarding the whites, they are often the culprit.

8564091e3cf82ea53843c0dbcf57857a

(990)

on September 23, 2010
at 07:54 PM

To add to that, try having the yolks raw.

1
0242b468fe1c97997749db416c92e7ed

(4528)

on September 23, 2010
at 08:48 PM

Have you tried fresh, pastured eggs, as opposed to the CFO eggs typically available at grocery stores?

I have a girlfriend who has thought she was allergic to eggs for years, but recently found that she could eat fresh farm eggs without difficulty. We now suspect that it may have been the GM soy feed given to the CFO hens that caused her sensitivities.

Just a thought!

A8d95f3744a7a0885894ee0731c9744c

(3761)

on September 24, 2010
at 12:31 PM

I have tried fresh pastured eggs :-/ It's a total bummer. They're one of my fav foods.

0
Medium avatar

on May 10, 2011
at 08:25 PM

I think I may have experienced this as well. I'm really bummed out too, cuz I love eggs. Such a great little food, in its own neat package.

The other day I had four hardboiled eggs with sea salt on an empty stomach, and had a bit of acid reflux afterwards. Other times, after I have eggs for breakfast, I sometimes get a sort of hungover feeling of lethargy, dry eyes and a mild wooziness/detached feeling. Not something I can't just deal with, but I wish it didn't happen...and I'm thinking it's the eggs. The last bit is a little more..."uncomfortable." If I eat too many raw eggs, I get very rushed digestion with watery stool, and cooked eggs sometimes give me looser stool as well. Is that a good description of your symptoms?

I'm very reluctant to remove eggs from my diet as I love them so much. But I may go a week or two to see if anything changes, or if it's something else that's doing this to me.

0
13c5a9f1678d75b93f269cdcf69f14d5

(2339)

on October 17, 2010
at 05:32 PM

My spouse gave up eggs for a year. He's been able to add them back. He was intolerant, not allergic, to both the whites and the yolks. Anyway, to answer your question. He makes a sort of hash for breakfast with leftover roast or steak,a small amount of onions, maybe some potato or other tuber, often browned up in ghee. He does eat a lot of bacon and has coconut milk in coffee. Or short ribs for breakfast - my fave.

0
62ed65f3596aa2f62fa1d58a0c09f8c3

(20807)

on September 24, 2010
at 03:18 AM

Apparently, egg allergy is quite common and is listed as the second most common allergy in children after diary. Supposedly, most grow out of it by age 17, but not all. Most people who are allergic to hen's eggs have antibodies which react to one of four proteins in the egg white:ovomucoid, ovalbumin, ovotransferrin, and lysozyme. Ovomucoid is the most common target of immune system attack. The egg yolk contains several potential antigens: livetin, apovitillin, and vosvetin. Many people are allergic only to the yoke or only to the whites.

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