2

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Does anyone have great recipes for dandelion greens?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created February 28, 2012 at 3:42 PM

I bought some dandelion greens yesterday and I can't seem to figure out what to do with them. Chopped them up in salad, way too bitter - borderline unpalatable. Steamed with some cranberries and tallow, still bitter. Sub bacon fat, or coconut oil, add sweeter fruit, still not doing it. Are they supposed to be this bitter?

1398eff69b192c35de5e0dbaad59052a

(2024)

on February 28, 2012
at 07:32 PM

Great way to get your foraging in, if you like going that route too! Seriously ... soooo addictive. My boyfriend and I fight over who gets the last spoonful.

246ebf68e35743f62e5e187891b9cba0

(21430)

on February 28, 2012
at 05:06 PM

Keep in mind that richness (fat) counters and complements bitter, as well as sweet. Because I am VLC, the vinegar takes care of the sweet, the bacon fat and smokey takes care of the richness - however a little honey wouldn't hurt if this still tastes too bitter for you.

Ef31d612a661d9fcb19c8965d3a2bd12

(533)

on February 28, 2012
at 04:48 PM

That sounds great!!!

D5d982a898721d3392c85f951d0bf0aa

(2417)

on February 28, 2012
at 04:40 PM

Yes, blanch them. This is the long respected cooking technique for reducing the bitterness in bitter greens.

8949bf87b0e0aefcad10f29975e4fa2b

(8989)

on February 28, 2012
at 04:32 PM

+1 best recipe here!!!

D31a2a2d43191b15ca4a1c7ec7d03038

(4134)

on February 28, 2012
at 04:14 PM

Zoomia, nice idea about the flower buds.

B525b3e4b1d6f1cdceec943cdec6eb7d

(1680)

on February 28, 2012
at 04:00 PM

Cool! I've never thought of doing that, zoomia. I grow Italian dandelions in my raised veggie beds; will cook the first flowerheads that appear this year. Thanks for mentioning this.

D31a2a2d43191b15ca4a1c7ec7d03038

(4134)

on February 28, 2012
at 03:51 PM

Some herbs are very bitter. It's just part of their "medicine".

D31a2a2d43191b15ca4a1c7ec7d03038

(4134)

on February 28, 2012
at 03:51 PM

Hi, Matt. Dandelion greens, when very small, are not as bitter. I pick mine early to avoid the bitterness. Some make tisane from the leaves to use as medicine. The older leaves are too bitter for me. Sorry, I don't know how to make them less bitter or more palatable.

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11 Answers

5
1398eff69b192c35de5e0dbaad59052a

(2024)

on February 28, 2012
at 03:55 PM

Blanching them first will get rid of some of the bitterness.

Also, one of my favorite things to do when the dandelions start poking up is to harvest the closed flowerheads and sautee in butter. They taste like a cross between asparagus and okra.

B525b3e4b1d6f1cdceec943cdec6eb7d

(1680)

on February 28, 2012
at 04:00 PM

Cool! I've never thought of doing that, zoomia. I grow Italian dandelions in my raised veggie beds; will cook the first flowerheads that appear this year. Thanks for mentioning this.

D5d982a898721d3392c85f951d0bf0aa

(2417)

on February 28, 2012
at 04:40 PM

Yes, blanch them. This is the long respected cooking technique for reducing the bitterness in bitter greens.

D31a2a2d43191b15ca4a1c7ec7d03038

(4134)

on February 28, 2012
at 04:14 PM

Zoomia, nice idea about the flower buds.

1398eff69b192c35de5e0dbaad59052a

(2024)

on February 28, 2012
at 07:32 PM

Great way to get your foraging in, if you like going that route too! Seriously ... soooo addictive. My boyfriend and I fight over who gets the last spoonful.

4
246ebf68e35743f62e5e187891b9cba0

(21430)

on February 28, 2012
at 04:04 PM

Wash them well, and put them in a metal or wooden bowl with some thinly sliced onions and walnuts.

Cook a bunch of bacon, up to a pound. Drain well and continue to keep the bacon fat warm.

Pour bacon fat over the dandelion greens, partially "cooking" them.

Chop up the bacon and add it to the greens, as well as a light toss with some apple cider vinegar or lemon juice.

If you take out the walnuts, you'll have the first dish my grandmother ever made for me using dandelion greens - and if I remember correctly, I cleaned my plate and asked for seconds as a small (8-10 years old) kid.

The salad is called "Wilted Dandelion Salad" and I'm sure it's around on google somewheres. This recipe also works well for most greens... but the bitter ones (Broccoli Raab, Dandelion, Mustard, Turnip) especially.

Ef31d612a661d9fcb19c8965d3a2bd12

(533)

on February 28, 2012
at 04:48 PM

That sounds great!!!

8949bf87b0e0aefcad10f29975e4fa2b

(8989)

on February 28, 2012
at 04:32 PM

+1 best recipe here!!!

246ebf68e35743f62e5e187891b9cba0

(21430)

on February 28, 2012
at 05:06 PM

Keep in mind that richness (fat) counters and complements bitter, as well as sweet. Because I am VLC, the vinegar takes care of the sweet, the bacon fat and smokey takes care of the richness - however a little honey wouldn't hurt if this still tastes too bitter for you.

1
225130a8626ef00fd5fa7c6201e52258

on May 14, 2013
at 01:34 AM

I blanch them for 30 seconds, then toss in a bowl with fresh onion, olive oil, lemon juice and a pinch of salt. I could eat this every meal. I also drink the water I blanched them in as a tea.

1
A048b66e08306d405986b6c04bf5e8e4

on December 01, 2012
at 05:58 AM

Maybe try sauteeing them with olive oil and garlic? I just eat 'em raw with some cubed tomato from my brother's garden. They're tough and bitter, but they're free, thery're fresh, they're organic, thery're high in calcuim, and I get bonus paleo-points from gathering them in my backyard.

1
6120c989fd5b69f42a0834b69b87955b

(24553)

on February 28, 2012
at 05:34 PM

I first saw this recipe in an herbal midwifery book. It is called Dandelion Italiano.

The trick is to discard the water several times, the more bitter the leaves, the more changes of water. Although, I've often wondered if the bitterness was part of the medicinal effect.

http://womanwithwingsblog.blogspot.com/2011/03/dandelion-italiano.html

1
De267f213b375efca5da07890e5efc25

(3747)

on February 28, 2012
at 04:05 PM

I eat them in salad but mix them with other greens to mask the bitterness.

1
0382fa263de4c83328dc34a56e25437f

on February 28, 2012
at 04:02 PM

I'm doing dandelion greens and red kale myself this week. I do them in the slow cooker with some meaty bones, marrow bones and a knuckle bone. Simmer bones for 2-3 days as you would for bone broth, then toss the greens in and cook on low/warm for about 8 hours. I splash them with a bit of apple cider vinegar before eating them.

0
89985542ffc00c296552951369fe809a

on May 14, 2013
at 03:26 AM

I mask their bitter flavor in a lot of fat but, yes, they are bitter :( Plug your nose and chow down -ha ha!!

0
34f00c7b4e5738cf04ead1a012a14ed1

(996)

on May 14, 2013
at 01:50 AM

Just fry with bacon. Makes a great breakfast!

0
Bdf98e5a57befa6f0877f978ba09871c

on February 28, 2012
at 03:54 PM

Makes a great tea. Just steep like you would tea leaves. If you grind the leaves and let them dry a bit, the tea is less bitter. Very good though, and lots of vitamins.

0
Ee70ee808f748374744404a00e1c22ed

(1163)

on February 28, 2012
at 03:52 PM

As far as I've experienced, yes. I usually throw them in soups and stews. Cooking for a while will get rid of some of the bitterness, and will wilt the leaves a bit (they tend to be pretty tough), but they are really just a bitter plant. Didn't you ever try to eat one as a child?

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