6

votes

Could I have that with bacon-noodles, please? (Hack my lasagna)

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created January 02, 2012 at 6:53 PM

Edit: OK, I'm boding stuff so people learn to read :P

I want to make this Wintergreen lasagna, and someone suggested I use zucchini instead of the lasagna noodles, but I really hate using zucchini in lasagna, plus there's already a huge amount of vegetables in this lasagna (2 and a half POUNDS of dark leafy greens. Good way to get your veggies, uh?!)

Then I thought maybe bacon would work instead of the lasagna noodles. Probably would have to cook it first so that I don't end up with lots of grease in my lasagna :P

  • Have you tried using bacon like this?
  • Do you think the bacon would get too dry?
  • Do you think whole bacon or crumbled bacon would be best? :-)
  • Or... ?

I know another option would be to use ground meat instead of the noodles, but I want a light lasagna.

EDIT:
Like I said I don't want vegetable layer because there's already a ton of vegetables in this lasagna.

EDIT:
This is my favorite lasagna in the whole world, I don't want other lasagna recipes. I'm making it as is, with lasagna noodles or "meat" noodles.

19acef0aed67ef8dc1118d8e74edb349

(2954)

on January 07, 2012
at 09:40 PM

Exxxcelent, thanks! This seems to completely bypass all the problems I expected bacon to cause. Will give this a try.

19acef0aed67ef8dc1118d8e74edb349

(2954)

on January 07, 2012
at 12:32 AM

Of-course I am sold on the meat idea, in case you didn't notice, this question is about bacon. Bacon isn't a vegetable last I checked. Regarding "just give it a go", I'm not made of money, so I'd rather not ruin a dish, hence why I'm asking for help ahead of time.

F0e558010a2ecb31fa37b7c491596b8e

(3850)

on January 06, 2012
at 06:23 PM

That's more thickly cut that I was thinking. I've had it that way but it's commonly served thinly sliced (like regular bacon thickness). Pre-frying it would crisp or toughen it up and yes would make it harder to cut. I wouldn't worry about using uncooked. Since it's a cured pork product, it's already "cooked", and it's got very little fat. What fat there is is located on the outside, and could easily be trimmed off.

19acef0aed67ef8dc1118d8e74edb349

(2954)

on January 06, 2012
at 06:09 PM

Like this? http://www.tollefsonfamilypork.com/minneapolis-pork/canadian-bacon.jpg Wow, there's no layers of fat on it like our bacon... that's awesome! So do you cook it like a roast, or like regular bacon? And would you layer it in the lasagna raw, or cook it first? I guess I'm asking if it would get too dry if I cook it twice, making slicing lasagna squares difficult to cut, but I'm also worried it would get greasy if I layer it raw. Thanks Kelly/

19acef0aed67ef8dc1118d8e74edb349

(2954)

on January 04, 2012
at 06:17 AM

Yep, sounds good!

19acef0aed67ef8dc1118d8e74edb349

(2954)

on January 04, 2012
at 06:17 AM

Sounds like a good idea :)

19acef0aed67ef8dc1118d8e74edb349

(2954)

on January 04, 2012
at 05:15 AM

"I'm not made of money!"

Ce7e28769d92d5de5533e775b1de966e

on January 03, 2012
at 02:21 PM

Ok.. so I thought about this. Different sauces and how they utilized smoked meats in them. Do you have a food processor? Why don't you take all your bacon, pulse it until its a a medium fine texture, pan fry until *lightly* browned, drain. Layer it that way, hold some back, and about 30 minutes before you take the lasagne out sprinkle however much you held back on the top so it can get crispy. You'll have the tender not gummy on the inside, crispy on top.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on January 03, 2012
at 11:52 AM

I did actually, don't know why eggplant and greens wouldn't go together.

19acef0aed67ef8dc1118d8e74edb349

(2954)

on January 03, 2012
at 07:00 AM

Yes hence why I asked 3 easy to understand specific questions ^___^ I wanted to know if anyone had any thoughts regarding bacon before I "gave it a go". I'm not rich, therefore I'd like to hear people's thoughts before wasting my money.

2fdb7a6236b04bdfc3dacaf2bc236515

(528)

on January 03, 2012
at 04:41 AM

Prosciutto is a great noodle substitute! The texture's different, of course, but it tastes yummy.

072fd69647b0e765bb4b11532569f16d

(3717)

on January 03, 2012
at 03:39 AM

You seem pretty sold on the meat idea. I'm not sure someone's going to invent a food overnight for this lasagna. Go with your gut and give it a roll. If it flops, there's next time.

Ce7e28769d92d5de5533e775b1de966e

on January 03, 2012
at 03:15 AM

totally agree with shari.

Ce7e28769d92d5de5533e775b1de966e

on January 03, 2012
at 03:13 AM

Yeah, it's still going to soften due to the steaming that will be happening in that pan, no crispy. The fat would be better but will still soften. I also totally agree with everyone's suggestion of thinly sliced meat.. you literally could do full layers and they will definitely be easy to dish up.

19acef0aed67ef8dc1118d8e74edb349

(2954)

on January 03, 2012
at 03:07 AM

Look at the lasagna recipe in question, in my opening post. We are not talking about ground beef + pasta sauce lasagna. Read the question next time ;)

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on January 03, 2012
at 02:41 AM

Conflict of flavors? From the person suggesting bacon lasagna? ;)

19acef0aed67ef8dc1118d8e74edb349

(2954)

on January 03, 2012
at 12:59 AM

Ashley: Yes I'm thinking frying them really well-done at first is the best thing to do, but I was worried that by doing that AND baking, they would go black. There's no sauce in my lasagna, but the ricotta cheese should be wet enough to keep the bacon moist. I really like your idea to cross-hatch the bacon, that way I don't have to crumble it. Would have marked you best answer if you'd put up an answer ;-D

19acef0aed67ef8dc1118d8e74edb349

(2954)

on January 03, 2012
at 12:27 AM

On a green lasagna? I know they're good on a red lasagna, but it's a bit of conflict of taste in green lasagna.

19acef0aed67ef8dc1118d8e74edb349

(2954)

on January 03, 2012
at 12:23 AM

MAN, people really need to read before they post :P

19acef0aed67ef8dc1118d8e74edb349

(2954)

on January 03, 2012
at 12:18 AM

But what if the bacon is well-cooked and chopped into bits in a food processor before putting it in the lasagna to bake? Do you think it would still be soft/soggy ?

D5d982a898721d3392c85f951d0bf0aa

(2417)

on January 03, 2012
at 12:13 AM

As someone who grew up on a frequent flyer dish of lowfat Mexican lasagna (can you hear me gag? thanks, Mom) I have to say that corn tortillas get unpleasantly slimy and gummy if they're not just the top layer.

60af23519906aa54b742ffc17477c3d3

(1186)

on January 03, 2012
at 12:07 AM

I saw this on an epic mealtime, but if you cross-hatch the bacon it should cook nicely and give you that solidarity you need in place of the noodles. I don't think they will get too crispy. With sauce it's probably more likely they will get soggy. I would cook them to crispy.

Ce7e28769d92d5de5533e775b1de966e

on January 02, 2012
at 10:51 PM

@Luisa, if you slice the meat really thin you should be ok. Like little ribbons. Do a test batch, slice and fry or roast on a high heat without any added fat, meat crackers!, and see what it looks like. If there is a lot of fat then you can do a partial bake, blot, then utilize in the dish. I bet you'll be fine straight in tho, as you're not going to add 2lbs of salami or something :)

Ce7e28769d92d5de5533e775b1de966e

on January 02, 2012
at 10:46 PM

Yes but noodles aren't like bacon fat gummy bears. Mmm.. bacon gummies... think steamed meat and steamed fat. Kinda weird and kinda spongy. Cooked crisp, chopped on the side to sprinkle on - that would be good.

100fd85230060e754fc13394eee6d6f1

(18696)

on January 02, 2012
at 08:49 PM

Every time I eat squid I think it would be easy to fool someone into thinking it was chewy noodles.

100fd85230060e754fc13394eee6d6f1

(18696)

on January 02, 2012
at 08:48 PM

I agree that cutting would be a problem, but isn't floppy otherwise desirable in this scenario? Noodles are nothing if not floppy.

19acef0aed67ef8dc1118d8e74edb349

(2954)

on January 02, 2012
at 07:43 PM

I got me some good salami yesterday. I wonder if it would make my lasagna greasy. But it sounds so good with the greens...!

19acef0aed67ef8dc1118d8e74edb349

(2954)

on January 02, 2012
at 07:22 PM

Ohhh, you mean Asian noodles and such? I thought you meant the gross gluten-free pasta they sell here. I like Asian noodles very much :-) My stomach is kinda turning in knots thinking about string noodles in a lasagna, though, hahaha :P

7dc950fc76a046048e683d2a27dced37

on January 02, 2012
at 07:15 PM

Hmm. Your experience with rice noodles and mine have been very different! But I've only tried the thin ones in thai noodle dishes, so the wider ones may not be as good. I'll try it for the team and report back ;).

19acef0aed67ef8dc1118d8e74edb349

(2954)

on January 02, 2012
at 07:07 PM

I hate alternative-flour pasta, they're simply disgusting. I like your idea to use deli meat though, and I think I'll give it a try, thanks!

19acef0aed67ef8dc1118d8e74edb349

(2954)

on January 02, 2012
at 06:56 PM

Right, Kelly? I'm so excited to try this too, I'm pondering why this isn't all the rage in the Paleo community, hence my caution :)

19acef0aed67ef8dc1118d8e74edb349

(2954)

on January 02, 2012
at 06:55 PM

I'm afraid that when it's time to get a slice of lasagna, the bacon won't slice neatly.

345c1755efe005edd162b770dc6fb821

(8767)

on January 02, 2012
at 06:54 PM

yum bacon! good idea, worth trying!

  • 19acef0aed67ef8dc1118d8e74edb349

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11 Answers

best answer

1
F0e558010a2ecb31fa37b7c491596b8e

(3850)

on January 03, 2012
at 05:30 AM

Canadian bacon won't get all crumbly and would probably make nice layers.

F0e558010a2ecb31fa37b7c491596b8e

(3850)

on January 06, 2012
at 06:23 PM

That's more thickly cut that I was thinking. I've had it that way but it's commonly served thinly sliced (like regular bacon thickness). Pre-frying it would crisp or toughen it up and yes would make it harder to cut. I wouldn't worry about using uncooked. Since it's a cured pork product, it's already "cooked", and it's got very little fat. What fat there is is located on the outside, and could easily be trimmed off.

19acef0aed67ef8dc1118d8e74edb349

(2954)

on January 06, 2012
at 06:09 PM

Like this? http://www.tollefsonfamilypork.com/minneapolis-pork/canadian-bacon.jpg Wow, there's no layers of fat on it like our bacon... that's awesome! So do you cook it like a roast, or like regular bacon? And would you layer it in the lasagna raw, or cook it first? I guess I'm asking if it would get too dry if I cook it twice, making slicing lasagna squares difficult to cut, but I'm also worried it would get greasy if I layer it raw. Thanks Kelly/

19acef0aed67ef8dc1118d8e74edb349

(2954)

on January 07, 2012
at 09:40 PM

Exxxcelent, thanks! This seems to completely bypass all the problems I expected bacon to cause. Will give this a try.

10
Ce7e28769d92d5de5533e775b1de966e

on January 02, 2012
at 07:08 PM

Fun idea but sadly, the bacon totally isn't going to cut. You could do a couple of things.. cut the bacon in pieces and line them up so they'll part when you cut - but they're going to be really really soft even cooked. Prosciutto would be amazing with those greens - instead of layering flat, as they won't cut easily, hand tear and put in the formation that you want. They will be nice and tender, salty/smokey/savoury less of a gooey or rubbery texture like the bacon would do. Bacon - so good and unless fried or baked and exposed to the fire so stupid floppy. Curses!

Hmm.. long slices of portobello mushrooms, eggplant, butternut squash. Angled slices of really nice sausage.

If you do decide to go with the bacon definitely update the post with how it goes!

100fd85230060e754fc13394eee6d6f1

(18696)

on January 02, 2012
at 08:48 PM

I agree that cutting would be a problem, but isn't floppy otherwise desirable in this scenario? Noodles are nothing if not floppy.

Ce7e28769d92d5de5533e775b1de966e

on January 03, 2012
at 02:21 PM

Ok.. so I thought about this. Different sauces and how they utilized smoked meats in them. Do you have a food processor? Why don't you take all your bacon, pulse it until its a a medium fine texture, pan fry until *lightly* browned, drain. Layer it that way, hold some back, and about 30 minutes before you take the lasagne out sprinkle however much you held back on the top so it can get crispy. You'll have the tender not gummy on the inside, crispy on top.

Ce7e28769d92d5de5533e775b1de966e

on January 02, 2012
at 10:46 PM

Yes but noodles aren't like bacon fat gummy bears. Mmm.. bacon gummies... think steamed meat and steamed fat. Kinda weird and kinda spongy. Cooked crisp, chopped on the side to sprinkle on - that would be good.

Ce7e28769d92d5de5533e775b1de966e

on January 02, 2012
at 10:51 PM

@Luisa, if you slice the meat really thin you should be ok. Like little ribbons. Do a test batch, slice and fry or roast on a high heat without any added fat, meat crackers!, and see what it looks like. If there is a lot of fat then you can do a partial bake, blot, then utilize in the dish. I bet you'll be fine straight in tho, as you're not going to add 2lbs of salami or something :)

2fdb7a6236b04bdfc3dacaf2bc236515

(528)

on January 03, 2012
at 04:41 AM

Prosciutto is a great noodle substitute! The texture's different, of course, but it tastes yummy.

Ce7e28769d92d5de5533e775b1de966e

on January 03, 2012
at 03:13 AM

Yeah, it's still going to soften due to the steaming that will be happening in that pan, no crispy. The fat would be better but will still soften. I also totally agree with everyone's suggestion of thinly sliced meat.. you literally could do full layers and they will definitely be easy to dish up.

19acef0aed67ef8dc1118d8e74edb349

(2954)

on January 02, 2012
at 07:43 PM

I got me some good salami yesterday. I wonder if it would make my lasagna greasy. But it sounds so good with the greens...!

19acef0aed67ef8dc1118d8e74edb349

(2954)

on January 03, 2012
at 12:18 AM

But what if the bacon is well-cooked and chopped into bits in a food processor before putting it in the lasagna to bake? Do you think it would still be soft/soggy ?

3
98bf2ca7f8778c79cd3f6c962011cfdc

on January 03, 2012
at 03:08 AM

Thinly slices chicken or turkey (deli-style) works beautifully in place of noodles.

Ce7e28769d92d5de5533e775b1de966e

on January 03, 2012
at 03:15 AM

totally agree with shari.

19acef0aed67ef8dc1118d8e74edb349

(2954)

on January 04, 2012
at 06:17 AM

Yep, sounds good!

3
77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on January 03, 2012
at 12:38 AM

I think jesuisjuba's idea of sliced portabellos would be good for one layer, but why not change the layers out as you stack? One layer portabellos, one layer butternut squash one layer sliced meat or bacon (if bacon was on top it wouldn't get soggy).

Just might have to try this at home!

1
361e96d70d6d3b91d63f6ad975e60ab6

(840)

on January 03, 2012
at 04:30 AM

I would love to try this this. have you considered drying/dehydrating the Bacon before hand is that it wont be mushy and lost in veg afterwards + it would be the sane texture as noodles before cooking

19acef0aed67ef8dc1118d8e74edb349

(2954)

on January 04, 2012
at 06:17 AM

Sounds like a good idea :)

1
8c8e71eb729c0edb4786c6f3ba8614e4

(568)

on January 02, 2012
at 08:20 PM

I know you said you want meat, but I just wanted to say that using aubergine slices is pretty good.

19acef0aed67ef8dc1118d8e74edb349

(2954)

on January 03, 2012
at 12:27 AM

On a green lasagna? I know they're good on a red lasagna, but it's a bit of conflict of taste in green lasagna.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on January 03, 2012
at 11:52 AM

I did actually, don't know why eggplant and greens wouldn't go together.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on January 03, 2012
at 02:41 AM

Conflict of flavors? From the person suggesting bacon lasagna? ;)

19acef0aed67ef8dc1118d8e74edb349

(2954)

on January 03, 2012
at 03:07 AM

Look at the lasagna recipe in question, in my opening post. We are not talking about ground beef + pasta sauce lasagna. Read the question next time ;)

1
Ca1150430b1904659742ce2cad621c7d

(12540)

on January 02, 2012
at 07:28 PM

You know, you might try layering it with sole filets or flounder filets, if you can find them. I've found that they make an interesting 'noodle' replacement in lasagnas. (and if you're wanting to replace spaghetti and tomato sauce, I've discovered that squid, sliced into strips and simmered in the sauces is MAGNIFICENT! -- in fact, I wonder if whole squid, opened into flat pieces, might be an option to replace the noodles in this dish, now that I think about it...)

100fd85230060e754fc13394eee6d6f1

(18696)

on January 02, 2012
at 08:49 PM

Every time I eat squid I think it would be easy to fool someone into thinking it was chewy noodles.

1
4de8f1be3ed89b2b0de3463349fb1737

(964)

on January 02, 2012
at 07:15 PM

Paleo crepes? Here's one recipe, of course you would want to hold the cinnamon and vanilla.

http://www.30daysofpaleo.com/my-blog/2010/10/day-15-.html

1
7dc950fc76a046048e683d2a27dced37

on January 02, 2012
at 07:05 PM

I think the bacon may be problematic for the reasons you suggest. My sister recently made a lasagna of sorts using a layer of spaghetti squash for the noodles -- she was thrilled with it. I've been thinking that layers of a good brand of deli meat (e.g. Applegate's organic roast turkey) might work. But as I'm a PHDer, I suspect what I'll do is follow the Jaminets' lead and use rice noodles.

19acef0aed67ef8dc1118d8e74edb349

(2954)

on January 02, 2012
at 07:07 PM

I hate alternative-flour pasta, they're simply disgusting. I like your idea to use deli meat though, and I think I'll give it a try, thanks!

7dc950fc76a046048e683d2a27dced37

on January 02, 2012
at 07:15 PM

Hmm. Your experience with rice noodles and mine have been very different! But I've only tried the thin ones in thai noodle dishes, so the wider ones may not be as good. I'll try it for the team and report back ;).

19acef0aed67ef8dc1118d8e74edb349

(2954)

on January 02, 2012
at 07:22 PM

Ohhh, you mean Asian noodles and such? I thought you meant the gross gluten-free pasta they sell here. I like Asian noodles very much :-) My stomach is kinda turning in knots thinking about string noodles in a lasagna, though, hahaha :P

0
2d1729002574093032132b662b536226

on January 03, 2012
at 12:38 AM

I know you said no zucchini, but I we recently did a lasagna following Sara Fragosa's recipe in Everyday Paleo. You need a really good mandoline and really big summer sized zucchini. I used little ones and they oozed out too much water. It tasted good, was just a big mess and necessitated bowls. I made it to use up a bunch of pre Whole30 dairy, and it was a total dairy bomb of full fat ricotta, full fat mozzarella. It made me a bit queasy to be truthful. I concluded that some foods cannot be made paleo. Jelly donuts also come to mind. Stuff that is built on the properties of pasta may just not work if you go totally grain free. I never tried the rice lasagna. When I gave up eating grains I basically gave up trying to make meals that were traditionally pasta based if the pasta was the primary structural ingredient. That is not to say that one cannot make incredible things with shredded zucchini or cabbage or spaghetti squash, but in my opinion trying to do this without the main ingredient is sorta pointless and not very rewarding.

0
164ed7cd8d84c926bc66f366619bf853

(495)

on January 02, 2012
at 07:13 PM

I used to make all sorts of lasagnas using diff. things... what about eggplant (salted then roasted), or rice noodle sheets (stack a few on top of each other) or just skip it altogether and have a quick "skillet lasagna" (no pasta).
or if you like/can eat dairy, why not skip the ricotta/mix & just layer with fresh mozzarella slices. makes it super cheesy! Corn tortillas, if you're corn-tolerant, would give that sorta chewy texture. Add a little more liquid to help them soak up & be less chewy/easier to cut.

D5d982a898721d3392c85f951d0bf0aa

(2417)

on January 03, 2012
at 12:13 AM

As someone who grew up on a frequent flyer dish of lowfat Mexican lasagna (can you hear me gag? thanks, Mom) I have to say that corn tortillas get unpleasantly slimy and gummy if they're not just the top layer.

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