5

votes

Cooking with Bone Broth?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created April 27, 2011 at 11:22 PM

I'm just finishing up cooking my chicken bone broth for 24 hours after gnawing everything off the bones, throwing them back in the crockpot, and adding a little apple cider vinegar.

I'm about ready to strain all the solids out and store the rest.

I know I can start a soup with the broth, but what else can I do with it?

I've had people tell me I can use it to make risotto, pot pie, mexican/spanish rice... all things I'd prefer to avoid.

So besides soup (or drinking it straight up), what do you do with bone broth?

Fb67dc30cead043d1d13ea503a3044dc

(3280)

on December 12, 2011
at 08:44 AM

Now that is a great idea! I've been trying different ways to get my morning eggs a little more interesting. Can't wait to try this. :)

2f931662684a7747be36255c8b486228

(1049)

on April 30, 2011
at 08:38 AM

How long does it last in the fridge?

Medium avatar

(4878)

on April 28, 2011
at 01:05 AM

I heat it, but it is completely jelly w/a thin layer of fat on the top. As a recovering vegetarian, I'm not that brave to eat it cold LOL.

07ca188c8dac3a17f629dd87198d2098

(7970)

on April 28, 2011
at 12:35 AM

Interesting use! Do you heat the broth before eating, or just eat it cold out of the fridge? Is it gelatinous when you take it out of the fridge, so if eaten cold you're essentially eating savory chicken jello? :)

03fa485bfd54734522755f47a5e6597e

(3944)

on April 28, 2011
at 12:32 AM

Yes, practically anywhere you might normally use water, you can use broth instead and boost the flavor and nutrition.

Medium avatar

(5136)

on April 28, 2011
at 12:16 AM

cooking greens like kale would be :toss some butter in a pan, maybe a bit of garlic or onion if you like, then add chopped greens and a bit of broth. Easy. Adding broth will cool everything down immediately, so add when your onions/garlic is soft, then simmer for a bit. I mean it's literally as easy as adding a half cup of broth to the pan of whatever you're cooking.

07ca188c8dac3a17f629dd87198d2098

(7970)

on April 28, 2011
at 12:11 AM

:( Sorry to hear it! Mine's been on low in the crock pot, makes me glad I bought the thing. My gas burners are a little unpredictable.

07ca188c8dac3a17f629dd87198d2098

(7970)

on April 28, 2011
at 12:10 AM

I'd love to hear/read some techniques for "cook greens", and "cook any vegetable". So far I've been doing the above by either steaming or sautéing, or both. e.g. spinach and kale I'll just sauté, brussels sprouts I steam then sauté, broccoli and cauliflower I'll just steam (and then drizzle with butter or hollandaise).

A89f9751a97c3082802dc0bcbe4e9208

(13978)

on April 28, 2011
at 12:08 AM

I burned my bone broth today on the stovetop! So sad!!

Cf626d3fba66c18297b3f1116a920e58

(3417)

on April 27, 2011
at 11:46 PM

Absolutely. That's what I've been experimenting with recently. These buttery pan reductions taste too good to be legal. Does the coconut flour thicken the broth for gravy well compared to something like arrowroot? I wouldn't mind replacing that stuff as a thickener if possible.

Medium avatar

(5136)

on April 27, 2011
at 11:39 PM

there's a little more info about stocks here: http://paleohacks.com/questions/31578/what-is-bone-broth#axzz1Kln4YoMj

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7 Answers

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7
Bdcb2101fd3f1853cfd645094d8ad086

on April 27, 2011
at 11:44 PM

You can literally do anything with it.

1) Cook greens.

2) Cook any vegetable.

3) Start a soup or stew.

4) Braise any chicken.

5) Make gravy (add a starch source, if you're flexible)

6) Add it (and any other ingredients) to ground or chopped chicken, pork, or turkey for additional savory goodness.

7) after sauteeing onions/garlic/other good things in fat in the pan, melt in the gelatine to make a sauce for meat, veggies, etc.

Seriously. Sky's the limit. It there's heat in the pan, and gelatin in your fridge, you can add "mouth feel" and savory, satisfying flavor and body to anything that is accompanied by fluid, glaze, gravy, broth, etc.

03fa485bfd54734522755f47a5e6597e

(3944)

on April 28, 2011
at 12:32 AM

Yes, practically anywhere you might normally use water, you can use broth instead and boost the flavor and nutrition.

07ca188c8dac3a17f629dd87198d2098

(7970)

on April 28, 2011
at 12:10 AM

I'd love to hear/read some techniques for "cook greens", and "cook any vegetable". So far I've been doing the above by either steaming or sautéing, or both. e.g. spinach and kale I'll just sauté, brussels sprouts I steam then sauté, broccoli and cauliflower I'll just steam (and then drizzle with butter or hollandaise).

Medium avatar

(5136)

on April 28, 2011
at 12:16 AM

cooking greens like kale would be :toss some butter in a pan, maybe a bit of garlic or onion if you like, then add chopped greens and a bit of broth. Easy. Adding broth will cool everything down immediately, so add when your onions/garlic is soft, then simmer for a bit. I mean it's literally as easy as adding a half cup of broth to the pan of whatever you're cooking.

8
Medium avatar

(5136)

on September 07, 2013
at 12:44 AM

it's excellent for deglazing pans as a way to make a quick, even more flavorful reductions/sauces. in other words, when you are done searing meat in a pan, remove the meat and leave the pan on the heat. Toss in a cupful of bone broth and scrape the pan. (Don't do this if you have burnt the bits in the pan, then it will only taste like burnt liquid. you're looking for browned bits). Then if you like to get more complicated with that you can add other flavors and continue to reduce. For example you could add mushrooms, herbs, spices, a splash of wine, heavy cream, etc. reduce a bit and if you want, strain for a smooth sauce.

You can also reduce it (boil the water out to achieve a more concentrated flavor and somewhat thicker consistency) and flavor it to make a sauce, exactly like above but without deglazing a pan.

you can use it to replace water in cooking anything you might want to give an additional meatier flavor, like certain vegetables. I find this to be a bit of a waste of perfectly good broth though, but you could do it.

You can add a bit to ground beef or pork while cooking to make the flavors of those meats less one dimensional.

If you're making say a tomato sauce, you could add some stock into there to give it an added punch.

Lastly, if you get really good at making stock, you can make a consomme, which is basically a stock that has been strained, then cooked again with more meat and veg and clarified with egg white. Consomme is delicious with incredible flavor and in the summer you can even serve chilled consomme as chilled gelled cubes!

Medium avatar

(5136)

on April 27, 2011
at 11:39 PM

there's a little more info about stocks here: http://paleohacks.com/questions/31578/what-is-bone-broth#axzz1Kln4YoMj

3
B4ec9ce369e43ea83f06ee645169cee0

on April 27, 2011
at 11:29 PM

Soups and stews mostly. I love using broth with cream for soups (if you do dairy).

Also... 'gravy' made with coconut flour, butter, broth.

You can also boil the broth down to a syrup and use it as a pan sauce... add a bit of butter if you do that... MMMMMM

Cf626d3fba66c18297b3f1116a920e58

(3417)

on April 27, 2011
at 11:46 PM

Absolutely. That's what I've been experimenting with recently. These buttery pan reductions taste too good to be legal. Does the coconut flour thicken the broth for gravy well compared to something like arrowroot? I wouldn't mind replacing that stuff as a thickener if possible.

2
2f931662684a7747be36255c8b486228

(1049)

on April 30, 2011
at 08:37 AM

Sounds like it would be a nice way to spice up scrambled eggs. We make "pappa al'pomodoro", you add tomato pulp to the egg and keep stirring though serve fairly runny. Kids usually loves this........with bone broth better !! I think I'll try it.

Fb67dc30cead043d1d13ea503a3044dc

(3280)

on December 12, 2011
at 08:44 AM

Now that is a great idea! I've been trying different ways to get my morning eggs a little more interesting. Can't wait to try this. :)

2
Bcb2f5436d11467e89123680c046b858

(1356)

on April 28, 2011
at 12:09 AM

I make lots of curries, and usually use (roughly!) 2 parts coconut milk to 1 part broth. Nearly anything you add water to while cooking, you can use broth instead.

1
41dfb1a4fecb38d24075ff52f13ccb28

on April 28, 2011
at 01:05 AM

I just posted a recipe for Pork & Greens here. Don't judge it by the bad picture. My camera died, so I'm left with only my camera phone. I've fed it to a number of people and they always go back for seconds, so it has to be at least decent. It's my favorite dish to use up bone broth as it takes 2 cups and I usually have a number of jars in the fridge that need to get used before they go bad.

2f931662684a7747be36255c8b486228

(1049)

on April 30, 2011
at 08:38 AM

How long does it last in the fridge?

1
Medium avatar

(4878)

on April 28, 2011
at 12:25 AM

I make mine using chicken backs from Whole Foods and a couple of marrow bones. I don't take the meat off and just let it cook until everything falls apart and the bones are soft. Occasionally I'll add veggies (celery, garlic, onions and left over herbs stalks, mainly) to add additional depth to the flavor.

You'd be surprised by the volume of meat that comes off those chicken backs!

After cooking, I remove the bones and veggie stalks, add lemon or lime juice to give it a salty flavor, and then portion it into 1 C containers while still hot. I stir the mixture to keep the nutritional proportions consistent ;)

I've found one of these hearty broth servings, with a fried egg, are a perfect and yummy breakfast.

07ca188c8dac3a17f629dd87198d2098

(7970)

on April 28, 2011
at 12:35 AM

Interesting use! Do you heat the broth before eating, or just eat it cold out of the fridge? Is it gelatinous when you take it out of the fridge, so if eaten cold you're essentially eating savory chicken jello? :)

Medium avatar

(4878)

on April 28, 2011
at 01:05 AM

I heat it, but it is completely jelly w/a thin layer of fat on the top. As a recovering vegetarian, I'm not that brave to eat it cold LOL.

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