5

votes

Changing weather, what are you cooking this autumn?

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created September 07, 2013 at 12:44 AM

Let's inspire each other! Tonight we had leftover carnitas (made from my local pastured half pig I just purchased), coconut bread, and kale from our garden smothered in kerrygold butter...my kids licked their plates! I may have as well ;-)

Medium avatar

(10601)

on November 05, 2011
at 02:34 PM

I've got a duck carcass roasting in the oven right now to recover meat (rillettes), fat, and liquid for stock. I stripped it last night, and will smoke the legs (cuisses) and pan fry the breasts (maigrets). The pan fry generates enough fat to fry some yellow Finn potatoes. With a glass of red wine and some cheese, it's fall.

Ed983a42344945b1ff70fd9597a23493

on October 05, 2011
at 09:44 PM

I do a simliar soup, but use chicken stock...I have a big pot of freshly made stock right now, and a lovely butternut...hmmm...

Ed983a42344945b1ff70fd9597a23493

on October 05, 2011
at 09:43 PM

What is your dry rub mix? This sounds divine, and I have a "butt" in my freezer. I made carnitas with the other one, nice to diversify...

Ed983a42344945b1ff70fd9597a23493

on October 05, 2011
at 09:41 PM

Yummm...goat is delicious...

Medium avatar

(2169)

on October 05, 2011
at 06:31 PM

Thanks for the tips! I'm going to give it a go :)

Cbb1134f8e93067d1271c97bb2e15ef6

on October 05, 2011
at 05:13 PM

(con't) or non-meausre out the 1/2 and1/2 and heavy cream by eyeball as it is the base of what the soup volume is going to be.More heavy cream will make it thicker, but again, NOT chowder consistency. Be care not to boil! Oh, and I use at least some of the fresh oyster liquid for flavor too. Sorry I can't be more precise! You might be able to use some kind of thickener too - like arrowroot. I am good with the more soup-like consistency, so have never tried.

Cbb1134f8e93067d1271c97bb2e15ef6

on October 05, 2011
at 05:10 PM

@WayfinderAli: Given that you want to make it "chowder-like" this probably won't work for you. It does *not* make a thickened, chowder like stew - really more like a soup. I don't measure, so I pour in a duthc oven type pot, and add heavy cream to it to get a bit of a thicker consistency. We get fresh oysters and I put in ALOT. Butter, for this I use garlic granules rather than fresh garlic, the salt and pepper, and I sometimes add in a goodly amount of onion and medium chopped celery. You can play with how much of these as they can "thicken" the consistency up too. Basically you measure

Medium avatar

(2169)

on October 05, 2011
at 01:40 PM

Thanks for the recipe!

Medium avatar

(2169)

on October 05, 2011
at 01:36 PM

Would you mind sharing that oyster stew recipe? I'm in NC, oysters are now in season and would love to make a good chowder type oyster stew.

C471216c9fb4fcf886b7ac84a4046b49

(1371)

on October 04, 2011
at 05:32 PM

I.LOVE.BOSTON.BUTTS.

7c9f81d68c78de1a31eab9c91c17b4b8

on October 04, 2011
at 02:55 PM

Sue. There is a good one in this post http://paleohacks.com/questions/66006/favorite-and-easiest-stock-bone-broth-recipe#axzz1ZpCej8c4 from Rhubarb. I took joint,marrow bones, carrots, whole garlic cloves, 3 onions quartered, splash of apple cider vinegar and salt with as much water as I could fit in 7 qt crockpot. It's been on low for 2 days. I'll siphon through cheesecloth tonight after I chill it and put in mason jars after I skim off the tallow for cooking. Oh and I roasted the bones for about 45 minutes first at 400.

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on October 04, 2011
at 02:32 PM

My meat menu is fairly stable. It's time for me to shift from the high fruit allowance I enjoy in summer toward some starchy vegetables such as rutabaga and celery root. I have to be careful, though, since nuts and starch are nature's "gain weight" formula and that's the last thing I need.

662a4ea915eb7c758bdd797d77ead7b6

(656)

on October 04, 2011
at 02:29 PM

do you have a recipe?

Medium avatar

(4878)

on October 04, 2011
at 01:13 PM

Beef, but that's also because I'm decreasing the amount of chicken that I eat.

2c2349bc7af0fedb59a5fe99dac9fae2

(2707)

on October 04, 2011
at 12:52 PM

what do you prefer for protein for this recipe? pork, chicken or beef?

Cbb1134f8e93067d1271c97bb2e15ef6

on October 04, 2011
at 02:14 AM

+1 - Nice, light, fun, "sharing" kind of question.Goodbye summer and hello fall in the ancestral world... :)

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13 Answers

6
Medium avatar

(4878)

on October 04, 2011
at 03:09 AM

Coconut curry pumpkin soup. Yum.

2 acorn squash, pumpkins, or other smallish winter squash
3 tablespoons unsalted butter, room temperature
1 14-ounce can coconut milk
1 teaspoon (or more) red Thai curry paste water
2 teaspoons fine grain sea salt (or to taste)

Preheat the oven to 375 degrees and place the oven racks in the middle.

Carefully cut each squash/pumpkin into halves (or quarters). Slather each piece of squash with butter, sprinkle generously with salt, place on a baking sheet skin sides down, and place in the oven. Roast for about an hour or until the squash is tender throughout.

When the pumpkin/squash are cool enough to handle scoop it into a large pot over medium high heat. Add the coconut milk and curry paste and bring to a simmer. Remove from the heat and puree with a hand blender, you should have a very thick base at this point. Now add water a cup at a time pureeing between additions until the soup is the consistency you prefer - a light vegetable stock would work here as well. Bring up to a simmer again and add the salt (and more curry paste if you like, I used just shy of 6 teaspoons but the curry paste I use is not over-the-top spicy).

Serves six.

Medium avatar

(4878)

on October 04, 2011
at 01:13 PM

Beef, but that's also because I'm decreasing the amount of chicken that I eat.

2c2349bc7af0fedb59a5fe99dac9fae2

(2707)

on October 04, 2011
at 12:52 PM

what do you prefer for protein for this recipe? pork, chicken or beef?

Ed983a42344945b1ff70fd9597a23493

on October 05, 2011
at 09:44 PM

I do a simliar soup, but use chicken stock...I have a big pot of freshly made stock right now, and a lovely butternut...hmmm...

Medium avatar

(2169)

on October 05, 2011
at 01:40 PM

Thanks for the recipe!

5
Cbb1134f8e93067d1271c97bb2e15ef6

on October 04, 2011
at 02:12 AM

Fall for me is always marked by a very simple oyster stew we make with 1/2 and 1/2, some heavy cream, butter, garlic salt and pepper. And I love cheese broccoli soup. These days, on a day to day basis, I don't eat much cheese, but this soup is a fav! We will also have lots of mustard greens and fresh pecans out of all the orchards around that I like to eat raw or sometimes toast very lightly with a bit of salt.

With summer leave some of my fav veggies: little crookneck "summer" squash, okra, all my homegrown grape and regular tomatoes and yummmy red, yellow and organge bell peppers that amke me happy all summer in my salads.

Medium avatar

(2169)

on October 05, 2011
at 01:36 PM

Would you mind sharing that oyster stew recipe? I'm in NC, oysters are now in season and would love to make a good chowder type oyster stew.

Cbb1134f8e93067d1271c97bb2e15ef6

on October 05, 2011
at 05:13 PM

(con't) or non-meausre out the 1/2 and1/2 and heavy cream by eyeball as it is the base of what the soup volume is going to be.More heavy cream will make it thicker, but again, NOT chowder consistency. Be care not to boil! Oh, and I use at least some of the fresh oyster liquid for flavor too. Sorry I can't be more precise! You might be able to use some kind of thickener too - like arrowroot. I am good with the more soup-like consistency, so have never tried.

Medium avatar

(2169)

on October 05, 2011
at 06:31 PM

Thanks for the tips! I'm going to give it a go :)

Cbb1134f8e93067d1271c97bb2e15ef6

on October 05, 2011
at 05:10 PM

@WayfinderAli: Given that you want to make it "chowder-like" this probably won't work for you. It does *not* make a thickened, chowder like stew - really more like a soup. I don't measure, so I pour in a duthc oven type pot, and add heavy cream to it to get a bit of a thicker consistency. We get fresh oysters and I put in ALOT. Butter, for this I use garlic granules rather than fresh garlic, the salt and pepper, and I sometimes add in a goodly amount of onion and medium chopped celery. You can play with how much of these as they can "thicken" the consistency up too. Basically you measure

4
0e395acc856e3353f3f5892e6b09b0e7

(1227)

on October 04, 2011
at 01:04 PM

Yesterday, my husband roasted duck thighs in a 250 degree oven for 3 hours then 325 degrees for 45 minutes having first loosened the skin and pricking it to let the fat drain out. I added a sweet potato to the oven for last hour. The duck was crispy and delicious and the sweet potato unctious. I lost a pound overnight. No foolin'

Medium avatar

(10601)

on November 05, 2011
at 02:34 PM

I've got a duck carcass roasting in the oven right now to recover meat (rillettes), fat, and liquid for stock. I stripped it last night, and will smoke the legs (cuisses) and pan fry the breasts (maigrets). The pan fry generates enough fat to fry some yellow Finn potatoes. With a glass of red wine and some cheese, it's fall.

4
24df4e0d0e7ce98963d4641fae1a60e5

on October 04, 2011
at 12:06 PM

Pork Butt! Brined overnight, dry rubbed, slow roasted (15 hrs, 9 lbs) @ 215 to internal temp of 185. Oh it is to die for buttery soft.

C471216c9fb4fcf886b7ac84a4046b49

(1371)

on October 04, 2011
at 05:32 PM

I.LOVE.BOSTON.BUTTS.

Ed983a42344945b1ff70fd9597a23493

on October 05, 2011
at 09:43 PM

What is your dry rub mix? This sounds divine, and I have a "butt" in my freezer. I made carnitas with the other one, nice to diversify...

3
0dbd7154d909b97fe774d1655754f195

(16131)

on October 04, 2011
at 01:40 PM

It's great chili weather as another poster said. But someone (I think it was familygrok) inspired me to roast all my veggies first. So I did and it was unreal.

I went to my garden and picked tomatoes, peppers, and pulled up some onion. I also grabbed an entire head of garlic. Oil and roast them all in the oven at say, 450, but oil and wrap that garlic up in foil. Once they're all browned and awesome. Take out to cool. Then what I did was put the whole mess in my Vitamix with fresh cilantro and oregano and about 1.2 cups of gelatinous bone broth. Puree!

Brown some ground been or cubed chuck separately. Drain, or not whatever - I drain. Turn to low and pour the pureed liquid on top and simmer for 23.7 minutes. Serve with avocado of course, some sour cream and some shredded cheese never made anyone sad either.

3
C2450eb7fa11b37473599caf93b461ef

on October 04, 2011
at 10:06 AM

I made sausage and kale soup yesterday with homemade chicken stock from my freezer. Last week, I made chili--without beans for the first time (hey, Texans, don't shoot me... I'm from the northeast!). I was concerned about the texture, so in addition to the grassfed beef, I added some locally made chorizo. YUM! I've been dreaming about it ever since.

3
Ce7e28769d92d5de5533e775b1de966e

on October 04, 2011
at 03:01 AM

Oh man, it's time to crank the oven up. Exciting!

  • Anything that I can do low and slow in the oven. Mmm. pork shoulder... short ribs..-
  • Butterflied chicken with different herbs and spices on the skin and under, roasted so it's all crispy and juicy
  • Loads of baked/roasted squash
  • Terrine
  • Baked apples
  • Soup - especially mushroom
  • Stew - red wine and beef and veggies
  • Big trays of roasted root vegetables, brussel sprouts!
  • Pumpkin pudding
  • Finally getting to meatza it up or experiment and make one with a gluten free crust
  • Kale and potato Tortilla
  • Pot Au Feu
  • Curries

Ok, I'm stopping now :)

3
7c9f81d68c78de1a31eab9c91c17b4b8

on October 04, 2011
at 02:14 AM

Marrow bone broth in my crockpot for 2 days!

662a4ea915eb7c758bdd797d77ead7b6

(656)

on October 04, 2011
at 02:29 PM

do you have a recipe?

7c9f81d68c78de1a31eab9c91c17b4b8

on October 04, 2011
at 02:55 PM

Sue. There is a good one in this post http://paleohacks.com/questions/66006/favorite-and-easiest-stock-bone-broth-recipe#axzz1ZpCej8c4 from Rhubarb. I took joint,marrow bones, carrots, whole garlic cloves, 3 onions quartered, splash of apple cider vinegar and salt with as much water as I could fit in 7 qt crockpot. It's been on low for 2 days. I'll siphon through cheesecloth tonight after I chill it and put in mason jars after I skim off the tallow for cooking. Oh and I roasted the bones for about 45 minutes first at 400.

2
D5d982a898721d3392c85f951d0bf0aa

(2417)

on November 04, 2011
at 11:51 PM

Last night I roasted a chicken covered with bacon, stuffed with onion, on top of a big bed of cabbage, in a cast iron skillet. OMG. I didn't know how much I could like cabbage. It got all caramelized.

Tonight we recycled the leftover chicken into roasted poblano soup with lots of nice charred onion, garlic, cumin, lime and avocado.

This time of year, every time I get the oven hot, I try to throw in a squash or apples or something else that is fab roasted, even if it's just going to go straight into the fridge for later in the week. And I do much better eating roasted veggies than any other prep.

2
E95216c62a14d21c371fcbf2fed8469b

(1867)

on October 04, 2011
at 01:54 PM

Eating the fall garden vegetables, shopping the farmer's markets for anything green and working some OT to buy a cow share. Oh yeah I'm hunting this year. FWIW, I'm an ex-vegetarian from the city! When you live out in the country and don't have two Trader Joe's, a Whole Foods Market and numerous independent health stores around you, you have to rethink the diet. I snapped up a pressure cooker on sale at Walmart (the town's only other grocery store). My father-in-law and I are canning. I'm giving bone broth a try this week.

2
24fcc21452ebe39c032be6801d6bbadd

(9812)

on October 04, 2011
at 12:03 PM

Last night I did a roasted chicken with roasted veggies (fennel, carrots, brussels sprouts, lots of garlic); it was great! :)

2
93ae9f2d376e5426e891a9b58d8302fa

(2936)

on October 04, 2011
at 02:04 AM

Experimented with tripe + suet in slow cooker. Kinda goopy textureless ick, so I'm gonna add chicken livers. Beat that!

1
306aa57660d911781231f8090c2a5619

(3808)

on October 05, 2011
at 04:23 AM

Lots of winter squash from our garden. More chilis and curries. We're going to do in some of the goats soon before we have to start feeding them for the winter, and, once we do that, lots of goat. Our summer squashes are still going strong, but we could have frost at any time (33F is the forecast low for tomorrow night), so probably not for too much longer.

I want to find something to take the place of bean soup. Liver works well in chilis, but I can't quite see it working all by itself.

Ed983a42344945b1ff70fd9597a23493

on October 05, 2011
at 09:41 PM

Yummm...goat is delicious...

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