0

votes

bone broth question

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created August 17, 2012 at 3:06 PM

i have one question that i cant seem to find the answer to anywhere, once your done cooking your bone broth, are you supposed to let it cool in the fridge for a couple hours, then skim the fat off of it, then you are allowed to eat it?

or can you eat it hot right after your done cooking it and not worry about the fat

43873f3cea4f22f91653b0f5ec7ab9d9

(401)

on August 26, 2012
at 12:34 AM

Why bring it to a boil when reheating? Is it otherwise unsafe?

Fd70d71f4f8195c3a098eda4fc817d4f

(8014)

on August 17, 2012
at 03:28 PM

As for the gelatin, that's the good stuff! It doesn't take long to liquify, but I think a lot of people add a little water to the stock prior to drinking or using in a recipe, because it's pretty concentrated. You can use it straight, no problem. I just think adding a little water makes it go further and you still get all the nutrition. You don't have to liquify it 100%...you can eat/drink stock however you want. Use for soups and stews, drink by itself in a mug...or eat it cold, by the spoonful, right out of the fridge while it's like "beef jello," hehheh.

Fd70d71f4f8195c3a098eda4fc817d4f

(8014)

on August 17, 2012
at 03:25 PM

I think covered or uncovered is a personal preference. Uncovered probably cools *faster*, but covered would keep dust/bugs out. Maybe use a piece of cheesecloth if you have it, or maybe a very thin towel/napkin. I usually leave mine uncovered. The more surface area you give the stock, the faster it'll cool. (Meaning putting it into containers that are wider and expose more of the stock to air. Downside is it's a bigger pain to remove the fat from multiple containers than just one.)

5f6d15c9dd935b6fed3623caf984c14e

(439)

on August 17, 2012
at 03:22 PM

also should i let it cool covered or uncovered

5f6d15c9dd935b6fed3623caf984c14e

(439)

on August 17, 2012
at 03:18 PM

ok thank you, and once it cools off in the fridge, i heard it forms into a jelly like substance, how long will this take to liquify in a pan on the stove, how long should i cook it before its good to go

  • 5f6d15c9dd935b6fed3623caf984c14e

    asked by

    (439)
  • Views
    7.7K
  • Last Activity
    1282D AGO
Frontpage book

Get FREE instant access to our Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!

3 Answers

4
Bd614f091f0625dea86bad5791471f2d

(775)

on August 17, 2012
at 04:28 PM

Don't worry about the fat. You don't have to skim it off. Sometimes I scoop some out and use it as it's simmering on the stove.

You should let it cool before you put it in the fridge. Cheesecloth is a good idea, or even a sheet of aluminum foil. I just leave it uncovered because it seems to take forever to get down to warm. It doesn't have to be "cool cool", but it should be warm. That's what Gordon Ramsay says, anyway. LOL

The gelatin gels when you put it in the fridge, but it only takes a few seconds to liquify on the stove. It's not like Jello or anything. You can cook veggies and stuff in it.

1
Fd70d71f4f8195c3a098eda4fc817d4f

(8014)

on August 17, 2012
at 03:11 PM

I don't see why you couldn't eat it right away if you're not worried about eating/drinking the fat.

I think most people let it cool because they're not planning to consume it right away, and because they specifically want the tallow (or whatever animal fat is coming out of your stock) to solidify so they can remove it and use it for cooking in the future.

Just as an aside: Most people let stock cool on the counter for a while before putting it in the fridge. It's just so darn hot at first that it might lower the temp of your whole fridge and affect other stuff in there.

5f6d15c9dd935b6fed3623caf984c14e

(439)

on August 17, 2012
at 03:22 PM

also should i let it cool covered or uncovered

Fd70d71f4f8195c3a098eda4fc817d4f

(8014)

on August 17, 2012
at 03:28 PM

As for the gelatin, that's the good stuff! It doesn't take long to liquify, but I think a lot of people add a little water to the stock prior to drinking or using in a recipe, because it's pretty concentrated. You can use it straight, no problem. I just think adding a little water makes it go further and you still get all the nutrition. You don't have to liquify it 100%...you can eat/drink stock however you want. Use for soups and stews, drink by itself in a mug...or eat it cold, by the spoonful, right out of the fridge while it's like "beef jello," hehheh.

5f6d15c9dd935b6fed3623caf984c14e

(439)

on August 17, 2012
at 03:18 PM

ok thank you, and once it cools off in the fridge, i heard it forms into a jelly like substance, how long will this take to liquify in a pan on the stove, how long should i cook it before its good to go

Fd70d71f4f8195c3a098eda4fc817d4f

(8014)

on August 17, 2012
at 03:25 PM

I think covered or uncovered is a personal preference. Uncovered probably cools *faster*, but covered would keep dust/bugs out. Maybe use a piece of cheesecloth if you have it, or maybe a very thin towel/napkin. I usually leave mine uncovered. The more surface area you give the stock, the faster it'll cool. (Meaning putting it into containers that are wider and expose more of the stock to air. Downside is it's a bigger pain to remove the fat from multiple containers than just one.)

0
20bff9cbbddf521bac87b434981502c3

on August 25, 2012
at 09:44 PM

I make bone broth once a week with chicken carcasses, leftover bones and sometimes add in extra necks/backs that I purchase for cheap from my butcher.

Quick answers:

  • Cool in an ice bath in the sink. Don't put directly in the fridge. I plug the sink using the same cover I use when taking a bath. Fill up the sink partially with cold water, add some ice. Prior to this step, I strain the stock directly into a large (heat-proof) bowl. This is where the stock will live a) while it's cooling and b) once it's cooled, in the fridge. You can cover it if you want but I don't since it will take longer to cool.

  • Depending on how long you cooked the stock, ratio of bones:water, etc. - the stock will take about 24h to set in the refrigerator. Waiting until it sets doesn't really matter, per se, other than the fact that it looks cool and you'll be able to tell how high the ratio of gelatin is by how "solid" the stock gets. For instance, my stock is usually firmer than your standard jello, but last Sunday I was super lazy and let it cook for 6 instead of my normal 8-10, and it barely set.

  • When you let the stock set in the refrigerator, the fat will separate and rise to the top. From what I've learned, chicken fat is a little high in omega 6 so I suppose you could skim off if you want. I don't, though. I just scoop it all out and add to whatever recipe I'm making! Also I suppose you should consider your chicken source to decide if you want to keep the fat -- foster farm stock fat = bad, happy chicken stock fat = good or at least neutral.

  • You can reheat directly on the stove, it'll melt in a matter of seconds but make sure to bring it to a boil before consuming. If you are heating it up to drink directly or to make chicken soup, I recommend thinning out with at least 1 part stock/1 part water, maybe a touch more water depending on how concentrated your broth is.

  • I'll also add stock directly to recipes like when I braise kale . zomg braised kale with chicken stock is the bomb. Talk about healthy.

  • When I am particularly on top of it, I'll just scoop out some stock as it's cooking and drink it up, make soup, or add to another recipe.

43873f3cea4f22f91653b0f5ec7ab9d9

(401)

on August 26, 2012
at 12:34 AM

Why bring it to a boil when reheating? Is it otherwise unsafe?

Answer Question


Get FREE instant access to our
Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!