2

votes

Beef heart tips?

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created January 05, 2011 at 8:22 PM

I still have traumatic memories of Mom cooking liver and the smell wafting through the house, but I want to try to re-introduce organs to my diet. I've been seeing that heart is pretty unoffensive, so I've been looking into some recipes, but I was wondering if any special preparation/trimming is needed, or if I can just chop it up and start cooking?

24fcc21452ebe39c032be6801d6bbadd

(9812)

on January 06, 2011
at 12:38 PM

I'll have to try that liver trick, thanks! And the heart recipe sounds great!

24fcc21452ebe39c032be6801d6bbadd

(9812)

on January 06, 2011
at 12:36 PM

Thanks everybody; very helpful info!

5740abb0fa033403978dd988b0609dfd

(2633)

on January 06, 2011
at 07:42 AM

CoQ10 is not a vital nutrient. Humans can synthesize all they need and unless there is some other condition at play, it's unlikely a healthy person is going to be deficient. Nice write-up at: http://lpi.oregonstate.edu/infocenter/othernuts/coq10/

C491ff8ce20d5c17f8f7ff94392a9570

(1617)

on January 05, 2011
at 10:04 PM

Off the top of my head I think it has a lot of coenzyme q10, which is hard to find anywhere else and s good for our own hearts.

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5 Answers

best answer

4
F8c63410ad2ade1978775862befb95ff

on January 06, 2011
at 08:12 AM

As I posted in another thread...

I have a penchant for heart at the moment, either beef or lamb. Cut out the valves, stuff with a mix of lard and veg diced in a blender, sew/skewer closed, pop into a roasting tin with some sort of liquid (I prefer cider but you could use stock or plain water), cover with foil and roast on low for a few hours, basting regularly. The lard melts into the meat making it beautifully tender and the juices merge with cider to make an excellent gravy. At the same time roast parsnip/carrot strips with a touch of honey drizzled over them, then present on a steamed savoy cabbage leaf... gorgeous!

I don't find heart has the same offal taste as liver at all. I use it a lot as it seems much cheaper weight for weight compared to other meat. If you're concerned about taste simply slice it up and throw it in a casserole or curry.

As for liver, I'm not a fan of the taste but I eat it a lot since I found a little trick which reduces the strength of the flavour; slice the liver thin then soak in milk over night. I do this then fry it with mushrooms, onions, sage and lots of black pepper.

24fcc21452ebe39c032be6801d6bbadd

(9812)

on January 06, 2011
at 12:38 PM

I'll have to try that liver trick, thanks! And the heart recipe sounds great!

3
C491ff8ce20d5c17f8f7ff94392a9570

(1617)

on January 05, 2011
at 09:31 PM

I cut the whole thing up and trim off any bits that look like I don't want to put them in my mouth. Then I grind it up and freeze it in 1/4 lb baggies. Add a baggie to a pound of ground beef and you don't even know it's in there!

2
7431586c21bca496c5a7ec7bd0ca4d6e

(974)

on January 05, 2011
at 09:29 PM

I find that heart develops an odd taste and texture if you leave it at room temperature for more than a couple of hours or in the refrigerator for more than a day. I get it frozen and after I defrost it, I cook it immediately.

2
531db50c958cf4d5605ee0c5ae8a57be

on January 05, 2011
at 09:01 PM

The valves must be removed.

-1
Medium avatar

on January 05, 2011
at 09:59 PM

Is cardiac tissue really considered to be offal since it is just muscle anyway? Seems like, at least nutritionally speaking, that it would be quite similar to muscle located elsewhere in an animal's body. Please correct me if I've overlooked something.

C491ff8ce20d5c17f8f7ff94392a9570

(1617)

on January 05, 2011
at 10:04 PM

Off the top of my head I think it has a lot of coenzyme q10, which is hard to find anywhere else and s good for our own hearts.

5740abb0fa033403978dd988b0609dfd

(2633)

on January 06, 2011
at 07:42 AM

CoQ10 is not a vital nutrient. Humans can synthesize all they need and unless there is some other condition at play, it's unlikely a healthy person is going to be deficient. Nice write-up at: http://lpi.oregonstate.edu/infocenter/othernuts/coq10/

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