1

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Anyone ever made fermented cream?

Answered on December 17, 2014
Created April 22, 2010 at 4:58 PM

Inspired by the kefir question, I was wondering if anyone had attempted to make 'yoghurt' from cream?

I have access to local raw grass fed cream, only problem being that it goes off much quicker than I'd like. I was hoping that I could ferment it to get a longer shelf life. Would this be feasible? Has anyone tried it? What did it taste like?

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on February 17, 2011
at 08:31 PM

Lots of ideas for culturing milk and cream have already been talked about here. I will say that I use powdered cultures I send away for instead of store bought yogurts and the like, as it is more reliable. I am still experimenting with using a higher percentage of cream in my homemade cultured milk products although the cream did separate to the top of my yogurt the other day (not bad tho) If I want to filter whey from my yogurt I will scoop some into my gold coffee filter and let it sit until most of the whey seeps out. Makes a delicious cheese like item.

D31a2a2d43191b15ca4a1c7ec7d03038

(4134)

on January 10, 2011
at 08:36 PM

I, do, too. I vary the mixture of heavy cream, light cream and half-&-half, as I please. High fat yoghurt is delightful!

14aa918d730371ed14f8e7e7d6eb6587

(373)

on December 10, 2010
at 03:15 AM

How do you filter out the whey?

A727956fa3f943057c4edb08ad9e864e

(4183)

on April 23, 2010
at 12:42 PM

Thanks guys, GREAT suggestions here! Never thought of creme fraiche!

6eb2812b40855ba64508cbf2dc48f1b6

(2119)

on April 23, 2010
at 02:39 AM

Yep, yogurt made from half & half is delicious!

5740abb0fa033403978dd988b0609dfd

(2633)

on April 23, 2010
at 01:58 AM

Well, now I don't know. You obviously have something that is working. I'll have to give the "wild ferment" a try and see what happens for me.

A89f9751a97c3082802dc0bcbe4e9208

(13978)

on April 22, 2010
at 11:07 PM

I thought cultured butter was a third kind of butter. And as for the food processor, I find that it cleans my butter (with the water) better than I can with a jar. And the cleaner butter is worth the extra cleaning effort to me. Besides, the food processor is ridiculously easy to clean.

5740abb0fa033403978dd988b0609dfd

(2633)

on April 22, 2010
at 10:33 PM

My understanding was for cultured butter, one still needed to add a proper starter to the cream. Is wild fermentation, as it were, dependable here? I didn't think it was. As for pushing a button being easier than shaking a jar... sure, but who cleans the food processor?

100fd85230060e754fc13394eee6d6f1

(18706)

on April 22, 2010
at 10:24 PM

I've done this, too. You'll never go back!

A89f9751a97c3082802dc0bcbe4e9208

(13978)

on April 22, 2010
at 09:32 PM

Allan, if you want sweet cream butter, you make the butter right out of the fridge. If you want normal butter, you let the cream sour a bit first. And for what it's worth, I find pressing a button on my food processor much easier than shaking a jar for five minutes. ;)

5740abb0fa033403978dd988b0609dfd

(2633)

on April 22, 2010
at 07:52 PM

I've made my own butter a number of times. You don't need to let it set out for a day. Supposedly the butter forms more easily at room temp. I've not noticed a difference. Also, the absolute easiest way to make butter is fill a jar half-full with cream, add a wine cork or similar to help agitate and shake with moderate vigor. I can go from cream to butter in 3-5 minutes and the only clean up is one little jar. Washing is optional, but any remaining milk will sour in a few days otherwise.

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9 Answers

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7
A89f9751a97c3082802dc0bcbe4e9208

(13978)

on April 22, 2010
at 05:21 PM

I suggest that you make butter and cr??me fraiche. Cr??me fraiche is a cultured cream. It basically takes your cream and adds bacteria to it to sour it. So it "lasts longer" or at least tastes better while it lasts so long. ;) It's like making yogurt, but with different bacteria. It's also known as French Sour Cream! It's great in broth soups, over steamed veggies, or with baked root veggies.

Butter

Leave the cream on the counter for a day. Put half of it in a food processor and process until it separates. Pour off the liquid. This is butter milk. Save it for the creme fraiche. The yellow solids that remain are the butter. Pour some filtered cold water in with the butter and process again. This is called washing the butter. Pour off the water. Discard it. Scoop your butter into an airtight container and store in the fridge or in a butter keeper on the counter.

Yum!

Cr??me Fraiche (cultured cream)

Take that butter milk (from the butter-making)... Take about 2 tablespoons and add it to a cup of fresh cream. Leave it in a warm window or a warm spot for 25 hours. It should thicken and taste sour. Transfer to "cold storage" aka the fridge.

When you're ready to make your next batch, you don't need to make butter again. Just use a few tablespoons of leftover cr??me fraise from the first batch to add to the cream to make the next batch! Ta da! Easy!

My cr??me fraiche has been in the fridge for several months just hangin' out. Last night we had some on our broccoli. Tasted great!

A89f9751a97c3082802dc0bcbe4e9208

(13978)

on April 22, 2010
at 11:07 PM

I thought cultured butter was a third kind of butter. And as for the food processor, I find that it cleans my butter (with the water) better than I can with a jar. And the cleaner butter is worth the extra cleaning effort to me. Besides, the food processor is ridiculously easy to clean.

5740abb0fa033403978dd988b0609dfd

(2633)

on April 22, 2010
at 07:52 PM

I've made my own butter a number of times. You don't need to let it set out for a day. Supposedly the butter forms more easily at room temp. I've not noticed a difference. Also, the absolute easiest way to make butter is fill a jar half-full with cream, add a wine cork or similar to help agitate and shake with moderate vigor. I can go from cream to butter in 3-5 minutes and the only clean up is one little jar. Washing is optional, but any remaining milk will sour in a few days otherwise.

5740abb0fa033403978dd988b0609dfd

(2633)

on April 23, 2010
at 01:58 AM

Well, now I don't know. You obviously have something that is working. I'll have to give the "wild ferment" a try and see what happens for me.

5740abb0fa033403978dd988b0609dfd

(2633)

on April 22, 2010
at 10:33 PM

My understanding was for cultured butter, one still needed to add a proper starter to the cream. Is wild fermentation, as it were, dependable here? I didn't think it was. As for pushing a button being easier than shaking a jar... sure, but who cleans the food processor?

A89f9751a97c3082802dc0bcbe4e9208

(13978)

on April 22, 2010
at 09:32 PM

Allan, if you want sweet cream butter, you make the butter right out of the fridge. If you want normal butter, you let the cream sour a bit first. And for what it's worth, I find pressing a button on my food processor much easier than shaking a jar for five minutes. ;)

A727956fa3f943057c4edb08ad9e864e

(4183)

on April 23, 2010
at 12:42 PM

Thanks guys, GREAT suggestions here! Never thought of creme fraiche!

2
0d2dec01a5ed9363a9915e111ae13f7e

on April 25, 2010
at 06:24 PM

I've made creme fraiche easily from local raw cream. Thick stuff, it comes in a jar like latex paint consistency from the dairy (they use a spinning separator). I just poor it out into a shallow bowl, and cover with a cloth at room temps from 65-85f. The warmer it is, the quicker it "sets up". The high fat, super low lactose content allows for a less volatile fermenting and growth of the native bacteria.

Every 8-12 hours I give it a stir and gage the thickness. Once it gets thicker than sour cream, I give it a last stir, seal it up in an air tight container and pop into the fridge. It comes out perfect every time!

http://www.kendallfarmscremefraiche.com/

I've bought this and mine compares favorably.

2
8564091e3cf82ea53843c0dbcf57857a

(990)

on April 22, 2010
at 05:57 PM

I make yogurt with half 'n half or with whipped cream. It tastes delicious and isn't as tart as whole milk yogurt. It also makes it much easier to digest. The process is the same as making homemade yogurt with any other milk.

Check out here how to make whipped cream from yogurt cream: http://heal-balance-live.blogspot.com/2009/06/how-to-make-scd-whipped-cream.html

Check out here how to make homemade yogurt: http://scdkatfood.blogspot.com/2008/04/scd-yogurt-tips.html

It would keep for 3 weeks in the fridge no problem.

6eb2812b40855ba64508cbf2dc48f1b6

(2119)

on April 23, 2010
at 02:39 AM

Yep, yogurt made from half & half is delicious!

100fd85230060e754fc13394eee6d6f1

(18706)

on April 22, 2010
at 10:24 PM

I've done this, too. You'll never go back!

D31a2a2d43191b15ca4a1c7ec7d03038

(4134)

on January 10, 2011
at 08:36 PM

I, do, too. I vary the mixture of heavy cream, light cream and half-&-half, as I please. High fat yoghurt is delightful!

1
D31a2a2d43191b15ca4a1c7ec7d03038

on September 12, 2010
at 04:37 AM

I make yoghurt using four parts half and half with one part heavy whipping cream. It makes a nice, thick yoghurt. I use a starter from the previous batch and leave the yoghurt in the yoghurt maker for 18 hours.

1
92826e5a6c5b4cd0c5c426d1da79dd59

on August 26, 2010
at 06:36 PM

I have a book that tells you how to ferment and eat a lot of fruits and vegs. It also tells me to buy whole fresh raw milk from a farm where the cows are turned out in fresh grass pasture. I have followed thier instructions,which could not be any easier. I first get a half gallon of raw milk, put it in a half gallon wide mouth canning jar, wrap it with a cloth to keep the light out of it and let it stand on the counter three or four days to ferment and get thick. Then i filter out the whey from the thick cream which by the way turns out to be very rich and creamy sour cream cheese. I than use the whey to make great fermented pickels in 2-3 days. The cream and whey will keep for over 6 weeks in the refrig . If interested check out the book .

                              NOURISHING TRADITIONS  by  Sally Fallon

14aa918d730371ed14f8e7e7d6eb6587

(373)

on December 10, 2010
at 03:15 AM

How do you filter out the whey?

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on February 17, 2011
at 08:31 PM

Lots of ideas for culturing milk and cream have already been talked about here. I will say that I use powdered cultures I send away for instead of store bought yogurts and the like, as it is more reliable. I am still experimenting with using a higher percentage of cream in my homemade cultured milk products although the cream did separate to the top of my yogurt the other day (not bad tho) If I want to filter whey from my yogurt I will scoop some into my gold coffee filter and let it sit until most of the whey seeps out. Makes a delicious cheese like item.

0
17ff1f89303641c0a9d2462d206cac9c

on December 17, 2014
at 12:23 PM

Heat a quart of heavy cream to 180 degrees F., let cool to 115.put 3 T. Whole milk unsweetened yogurt in small bowl and stir in 1/3 c. Cooled cream. Very gently add mixture to cooled cream and cover. Put in cold oven with 100 watt bulb on and let culture sit for 24 hours. Stir once and refrigerate in covered container. Even better with grass fed cream! 

0
87931d575a6af79fbfac0e4c5a359313

on April 06, 2011
at 01:29 PM

I have tried most of the home made recipes found on the internet with a variety of success, some good and some not so good. Most of which involve heavy or whipping cream with buttermilk as the fermenting agent.

Yesterday I got my hands on a quart of raw Guernsey cream and I am really looking forward to making Creme Fraiche. I read the previous posts above by Tim Rangitsch and Roger Shanafelt and wonder is that easy? I do not need to add any bacteria culture? I have read where people add cheese making bacteria culture when using store bought milk(s). Any advice would be appreciated... Thanks...

0
92826e5a6c5b4cd0c5c426d1da79dd59

on January 10, 2011
at 07:41 PM

The best way we found was to use a large strainer lined with a heavy dish towel.

0
065bc9a541c742defb28b9c58ad34fbd

(1783)

on December 07, 2010
at 09:47 PM

I just found 4-500 ml containers of cream on sale for 99 cents each (usually $3.49) and snapped them up! (They "expired" yesterday but I'm drinking one straight right now and it tastes great). I'm going to try making some butter and creme fraiche - this thread is full of great info.

The bottles are glass and I can take them back to the store for a $1 credit, so technically I'll be getting paid to enjoy all this delicious local cream. Best deal ever.

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