1

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Best Non-Paleo Cookbooks for the Paleo Home Chef

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created March 05, 2013 at 6:06 PM

I'm seeking the best cookbooks on any cuisine, e.g., French, Italian, Thai, Japanese, Indian, West African, Brazilian, etc. et. al. that is non-paleo, but which you have noticed is heavy on all the good stuff, and light on all the bad stuff.

Just a title will do.

However, an Amazon link, or a link to a review which you think portrays the book accurately would be most appreciated.

Best, Jared

C5c1073ffc65c5b737408d1d6cc68e86

(610)

on April 02, 2013
at 05:27 PM

Great! I'm glad I could be some help to you.

1e9164a5a54003ac247d49c574dc7bfc

(396)

on April 01, 2013
at 10:51 PM

This is the most intriguing one out of all the answers, so far as cookbooks I did not know goes, and thus I will choose it. Especially since it satisfies both my desires: To learn new techniques, which are then applicable outside of their cuisine or dish, as well as begin to gain some deeper knowledge in a specific cuisine.

1e9164a5a54003ac247d49c574dc7bfc

(396)

on April 01, 2013
at 10:50 PM

This is a great response, everyone. Thank you so much!

1e9164a5a54003ac247d49c574dc7bfc

(396)

on April 01, 2013
at 10:49 PM

I think, even before this comment, it was going to be my first purchase. :) I love Cooks Illustrated.

1e9164a5a54003ac247d49c574dc7bfc

(396)

on April 01, 2013
at 10:48 PM

These are great recommendations, as they are a big part, also, of what I'm looking for.

E36cb992cf0a5eba8b97a359c15f38b3

(4347)

on March 07, 2013
at 07:23 PM

Really anything by Deborah Madison is good. She does such a beautiful job with her vegetables. "Local Flavor" is another one, not strictly vegetarian but produce-centered.

E36cb992cf0a5eba8b97a359c15f38b3

(4347)

on March 05, 2013
at 09:25 PM

Ruhlman's Twenty is good. His book Charcuterie is also fantastic.

782d92f4127823bdfb2ddfcbcf961d0e

(5231)

on March 05, 2013
at 08:49 PM

I can't find my JoC but I think it has recipes for many game meats such as raccoon.

E36cb992cf0a5eba8b97a359c15f38b3

(4347)

on March 05, 2013
at 08:10 PM

I forgot to add "Good Meat," which is similar to the River Cottage volume. It's all nose-to-tail stuff, not all of it grain/sugar/whatever-free.

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12 Answers

best answer

1
C5c1073ffc65c5b737408d1d6cc68e86

on March 05, 2013
at 06:24 PM

Stir-Frying to the Sky's Edge by Grace Young (James Beard-winning Cookbook)

Review:

In her most recent book Stir-Frying to the Sky???s Edge, Grace Young demystifies this ancient cooking technique, which, she says hasn???t been done very well in this country.

???When I see recipes for stir-fry in the paper or magazines, I???m mortified,??? she said with great urgency. ???What you soon realize is that most people don???t end up with a good stir-fry, they end up with a soggy braise.??? So, Young set out to find best way for people to replicate what a stir-fry should taste like. ???When you use seasonal ingredients and cook the food quickly on high heat, the result is an intensely flavored, seared aroma that???s not like anything else you???ve ever tasted in your life. It???s incredible.???

Of course using the right pan is important, and for Grace Young that means a well-seasoned 14-inch, flat bottomed, carbon steel wok. In Stir-Frying to the Sky???s Edge, Grace uncovers how this method is a kind of Culinary Chameleon thanks to Chinese who brought the woks and the technique with them when they moved to other countries. She recounts a visit to Trinidad, where she learned a ???wonderful shrimp dish??? from a Chinese cook who, unable to find rice wine for the dish, substituted dark rum, instead. ???The flavor was incredible,??? Young gushed. ???It was just more flavorful and intense.???

*You bet this is good. Meat, Veggies, Seafood. Rice and noodles can all be substituted & paleo-ized. I totally recommend this cookbook. Enjoy!

mrmirek.blogspot.com

C5c1073ffc65c5b737408d1d6cc68e86

(610)

on April 02, 2013
at 05:27 PM

Great! I'm glad I could be some help to you.

1e9164a5a54003ac247d49c574dc7bfc

(396)

on April 01, 2013
at 10:51 PM

This is the most intriguing one out of all the answers, so far as cookbooks I did not know goes, and thus I will choose it. Especially since it satisfies both my desires: To learn new techniques, which are then applicable outside of their cuisine or dish, as well as begin to gain some deeper knowledge in a specific cuisine.

2
Ed7403e397077dd1acdbf25c7f6e56ce

on March 05, 2013
at 06:42 PM

Joy of Cooking is pretty much the only cookbook I've ever needed.

Full of methods, preparations, and tips that you can apply with or without their specific recipes.

There is quite a bit in there that's unusable from a Paleo stand-point, but I still say it's the best overall.

782d92f4127823bdfb2ddfcbcf961d0e

(5231)

on March 05, 2013
at 08:49 PM

I can't find my JoC but I think it has recipes for many game meats such as raccoon.

2
6864d23c49952605b2a97d6256af804d

(726)

on March 05, 2013
at 06:22 PM

For cooking fundamentals, maybe start with classic French, like Brillat-Savarin's Physiology of taste, perhaps moving on to Julia Child's treatment of the cuisine, followed by a more modern treatment such as the New Professional Chef. Then you want something more regional such as The Normal Table by Guermont and Frumpkin. Italian is also best separated into regional specialties, and I like La Cucina di Lidia among a sea of good books. The venison sguazet recipe in there is tastier than extinct megafauna.

1
705e66484ed64fe8e188123de398413e

on March 07, 2013
at 06:09 PM

I highly recommend America's Test Kitchen. Any of their books is great but especially The Science of Good Cooking.

These guys are great at breaking rules and teaching techniques that really work. They actually test their recipes internally and with readers before publishing them.

1e9164a5a54003ac247d49c574dc7bfc

(396)

on April 01, 2013
at 10:49 PM

I think, even before this comment, it was going to be my first purchase. :) I love Cooks Illustrated.

1
C5c1073ffc65c5b737408d1d6cc68e86

on March 05, 2013
at 09:10 PM

I posed this question to some of my favorite bloggers too, and they came back with these answers. Sorry for the lack of reviews, but here are the links:

1) A Girl & Her Pig (suggested by Neohomesteading)

2) Plenty (also suggested by Neohomesteading)

3) Nourishing Traditions (Suggested by The Paleo Mama; Weston A. Price Foundation Book)

4) Cook's Illustrated (Suggested by The Clothes Make The Girl)

5) Cradle of Flavor (Suggested by The Domestic Man; SE Asian)

6) The Art of Simple Foods (Suggested by Paul Jaminet, author of The Perfect Health Diet)

7) Fire in My Belly: Real Cooking (Suggested by Paleo Comfort Foods)

8) Jerusalem: A Cookbook (Ottolenghi) (Suggested by Paleo Comfort Foods)

9) Anthony Bourdain's Les Halles Cookbook (Suggested by Rubies & Radishes)

10) The Complete Nose to Tail (Suggested by Rubies & Radishes)

Enjoy! mrmirek.blogspot.com

1
782d92f4127823bdfb2ddfcbcf961d0e

on March 05, 2013
at 08:58 PM

I enjoy and find useful cookbooks that demonstrate how to cook, more than recipe cookbooks. Some of my favorites are:

"Think Like a Chef" by Tom Colicchio

"Ruhlman's Twenty" by Michael Ruhlman

"How to Read a French Fry...and Other Stories of Intriguing Kitchen Science" by Russ Parsons.

Not everything is Paleo, of course, but if you understand different cooking methods and the properties of your ingredients then you can cook just about anything and it will turn out good.

E36cb992cf0a5eba8b97a359c15f38b3

(4347)

on March 05, 2013
at 09:25 PM

Ruhlman's Twenty is good. His book Charcuterie is also fantastic.

1e9164a5a54003ac247d49c574dc7bfc

(396)

on April 01, 2013
at 10:48 PM

These are great recommendations, as they are a big part, also, of what I'm looking for.

1
E36cb992cf0a5eba8b97a359c15f38b3

on March 05, 2013
at 08:09 PM

I like Alice Waters' "The Art of Simple Food," Hugh Fearnley-Whitingstall's "River Cottage Meat Book," Julia Child's book, Claudia Roden's "The Food of Spain." Actually, anything Claudia Roden has written (Spanish and north African/Middle Eastern food). Marcus Samuelsson's African food cookbook is excellent as well, though I forget the title. I LOVE "Japanese Farm Cooking," which came out last fall and is actually quite useful if you eat rice/use tamari. You might also check out "Burma," as well as Ottolenghi's "Plenty" (vegetarian, but gorgeous treatment of vegetables and plenty of gluten-free stuff) and "Jerusalem".

Sorry, I know that's a lot. I do a lot of book reviewing and those are my favorites. (I'm also a bit of a cookbook junkie.)

E36cb992cf0a5eba8b97a359c15f38b3

(4347)

on March 05, 2013
at 08:10 PM

I forgot to add "Good Meat," which is similar to the River Cottage volume. It's all nose-to-tail stuff, not all of it grain/sugar/whatever-free.

0
5e5ff249c9161b8cd96d7eff6043bc3a

(4713)

on March 07, 2013
at 05:51 PM

Tim Ferriss' Four Hour Chef

0
2b73a3eb88268e9ba52a0c2f3b6f5b1a

on March 06, 2013
at 03:07 AM

"Vegetarian Cooking for Everyone." by Deborah Madison (James Beard book award winner). Yes, it's vegetarian, but the good kind - she focuses on vegetables, discussing each kind in detail, including handling, basic preparation methods (how to roast or fry or whatever that particular veg) and which fats, herbs and spices go especially well with it. She's also not afraid of eggs, butter and cream. There are many non-Paleo recipes, but enough technique- and pairing-advice to make it well worth reading.

E36cb992cf0a5eba8b97a359c15f38b3

(4347)

on March 07, 2013
at 07:23 PM

Really anything by Deborah Madison is good. She does such a beautiful job with her vegetables. "Local Flavor" is another one, not strictly vegetarian but produce-centered.

0
32652cb696b75182cb121009ee4edea3

(5802)

on March 05, 2013
at 10:29 PM

I do more online than in cookbooks.

EMERIL. If you need to know how to make vegetables yummy with animal fats.

JULIE CHILD. Old episodes of her shows are on Netflix. I've learned so much technique, esp on things like how to cook liver.

0
4610451431ec7155c87a5698be682a95

(1122)

on March 05, 2013
at 09:50 PM

0
54c341fad3b61c46f39acc14f4146e15

on March 05, 2013
at 07:18 PM

There are several wonderful cookbooks out there that aren't geared towards paleo but have several Paleo safe recipes in them. One of my favorites is a book called All About Braising by Molly Stevens which features very few non Paleo dishes and all of them use lots of veggies and meat in them (lots of uses for bone broth in here as well). You can check it out here: http://amzn.to/11am2Dq

There is also another book by her that I have not tried but imagine that one is pretty good too.

The Essentials of Classic Italian cooking have a ton of recipes in it that are paleo friendly but also has a ton of non paleo friendly recipes. Still a great cookbook and has lots of great techniques just gotta get past the use of pasta. (At least it's homemade) you can check that one out here: http://amzn.to/RzhiC5

Hope these help.

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