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I need help with my college paper

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created November 26, 2011 at 1:02 PM

This semester I am taking a class called Writing to make a difference, my next assignment to take some common wisdom and refute it. Naturally I chose the topic of saturated fat. This Monday I have to come to class with evidence supporting my claim and I was wondering if anyone here had any articles, studies, and statistics that would help me. Also, I have this feeling that my teacher is a vegan or vegetarian, so this should be fun. Thank you

De21ae6fc33a37dabeeff82e361a2488

(10)

on November 27, 2011
at 11:09 AM

thank you i will. My last paper i wrote was about body image in hunter gatherers, and i claimed that humans genetically are supposed to be thin and fit, and she wasnt happy about that. I live and study in israel now and i feel like this is the most vegetarian friendly country in the world. Army service is mandatory and if your a vegetarian or vegan they'll give you the right food, however if your a celiac, you are dismissed, also have of the restaurants here are vegetarian because of kosher reasons.

Medium avatar

(8239)

on November 26, 2011
at 04:13 PM

May be "fun" indeed, unless of course your teacher is a zealot-vegan (synonymous?). In which case: remember that even though the facts be with you, your teacher may look for cheap ways to grade you down. So get your facts straight, put citations in correct format, and as for conclusions, you should favor the conditional voice: "It may reasonably concluded that saturated fat has not be shown definitively to cause..." and "Contrary to the declarations of Ancil Keys in his famously flawed correlational study..."

De21ae6fc33a37dabeeff82e361a2488

(10)

on November 26, 2011
at 02:57 PM

thank you really appreciate it

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6 Answers

8
Cdee7454bccdc4ac14ec23b9657eb573

on November 26, 2011
at 02:57 PM

I hope this helps, Jonny. I listed all the following scientific articles at one of my blogs. If you go there, you can click on hyperlinks to see the actual articles or abstracts: http://advancedmediterraneandiet.com/blog/2009/07/06/are-saturated-fats-really-all-that-bad/

Siri-Tarino, Patty, et al. Meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies evaluating the association of saturated fat with cardiovascular disease. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, January 13, 2010. doi:10.3945/ajcn.2009.27725

Skeaff, C. Murray and Miller, Jody. Dietary fat and coronary heart disease: Summary of evidence from prospective cohort and randomised controlled trials. Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism, 55 (2009): 173-201.

Halton, Thomas, et al. Low-carbohydrate-diet score and the risk of coronary heart disease in women. New England Journal of Medicine, 355 (2006): 1,991-2,002.

German, J. Bruce, and Dillard, Cora J. Saturated fats: What dietary intake? American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 80 (2004): 550-559.

Ravnskov, U. The questionable role of saturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids in cardiovascular disease. Journal of Clinical Epidemiology, 51 (1998): 443-460.

Ravsnskov, U. Hypothesis out-of-date. The diet-heart idea. Journal of Clinical Epidemiology, 55 (2002): 1,057-1,063.

Ravnskov, U, et al. Studies of dietary fat and heart disease. Science, 295 (2002): 1,464-1,465.

Taubes, G. The soft science of dietary fat. Science, 291 (2001): 2535-2541.

Zarraga, Ignatius, and Schwartz, Ernst. Impact of dietary patterns and interventions on cardiovascular health. Circulation, 114 (2006): 961-973.

Mente, Andrew, et al. A Systematic Review of the Evidence Supporting a Causal Link Between Dietary Factors and Coronary Heart Disease. Archives of Internal Medicine, 169 (2009): 659-669.

Parikh, Parin, et al. Diets and cardiovascular disease: an evidence-based assessment. Journal of the American College of Cardiology, 45 (2005): 1,379-1,387.

Bray, G.A. Review of Good Calories, Bad Calories. Obesity Reviews, 9 (2008): 251-263. Reproduced at the Protein Power website of Drs. Michael and Mary Dan Eades. [Perhaps this doesn???t belong here.]

Hooper, L., et al. Dietary fat intake and prevention of cardiovascular disease: systematic review. British Medical Journal, 322 (2001): 757-763.

Weinberg, W.C. The Diet-Heart Hypothesis: a critique. Journal of the American College of Cardiology, 43 (2004): 731-733.

Mozaffarian, Darius, et al. Dietary fats, carbohydrate, and progression of coronary atherosclerosis in postmenopausal women. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 80 (2004): 1,175-1,184. (Related editorial: Knopp, Robert and Retzlaff, Barbara. Saturated fat prevents coronary artery disease? An American paradox. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 80 (2004): 1.102-1.103.)

Yusuf, S., et al. Effect of potentially modifiable risk factors associated with myocardial infarction in 52 countries (the INTERHEART study): case-control study. Lancet, 364 (2004): 937-952. [ApoB/ApoA1 ratio was a risk factor for heart attack, so dietary saturated fat may play a role if it affects this ratio.]

Hu, Frank. Diet and cardiovascular disease prevention: The need for a paradigm shift. Journal of the American College of Cardiology, 50 (2007): 22-24. [Dr. Hu de-emphasizes the original diet-heart hypothesis, noting instead that ???. . . reducing dietary GL [glycemic load] should be made a top public health priority.???]

Oh, K., et al. Dietary fat intake and risk of coronary heart disease in women: 20 years of follow-up of the Nurses??? Health Study. American Journal of Epidemiology, 161 (2005): 672-679.

-Steve

5
0f32ad570e3bf419432429d3ac842405

(235)

on November 26, 2011
at 01:39 PM

this really should not be difficult you can start out here, for example > http://www.marksdailyapple.com/saturated-fat-healthy/

here is also a more recent "scientific", i.e. published in a peer-reviewed journal, paper

Am J Clin Nutr. 2011 Apr;93(4):684-8. Epub 2011 Jan 26. The role of reducing intakes of saturated fat in the prevention of cardiovascular disease: where does the evidence stand in 2010? Astrup A, Dyerberg J, Elwood P, Hermansen K, Hu FB, Jakobsen MU, Kok FJ, Krauss RM, Lecerf JM, LeGrand P, Nestel P, Ris??rus U, Sanders T, Sinclair A, Stender S, Tholstrup T, Willett WC. Source

Department of Human Nutrition, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Denmark. Abstract

Current dietary recommendations advise reducing the intake of saturated fatty acids (SFAs) to reduce coronary heart disease (CHD) risk, but recent findings question the role of SFAs. This expert panel reviewed the evidence and reached the following conclusions: the evidence from epidemiologic, clinical, and mechanistic studies is consistent in finding that the risk of CHD is reduced when SFAs are replaced with polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs). In populations who consume a Western diet, the replacement of 1% of energy from SFAs with PUFAs lowers LDL cholesterol and is likely to produce a reduction in CHD incidence of ???2-3%. No clear benefit of substituting carbohydrates for SFAs has been shown, although there might be a benefit if the carbohydrate is unrefined and has a low glycemic index. Insufficient evidence exists to judge the effect on CHD risk of replacing SFAs with MUFAs. No clear association between SFA intake relative to refined carbohydrates and the risk of insulin resistance and diabetes has been shown. The effect of diet on a single biomarker is insufficient evidence to assess CHD risk. The combination of multiple biomarkers and the use of clinical endpoints could help substantiate the effects on CHD. Furthermore, the effect of particular foods on CHD cannot be predicted solely by their content of total SFAs because individual SFAs may have different cardiovascular effects and major SFA food sources contain other constituents that could influence CHD risk. Research is needed to clarify the role of SFAs compared with specific forms of carbohydrates in CHD risk and to compare specific foods with appropriate alternatives.

PMID: 21270379 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE] PMCID: PMC3138219 [Available on 2012/4/1]

Free full text

De21ae6fc33a37dabeeff82e361a2488

(10)

on November 26, 2011
at 02:57 PM

thank you really appreciate it

0
6714718e2245e5190017d643a7614157

on November 27, 2011
at 02:38 AM

I thought this article was a good read:

http://www.menshealth.com/health/saturated-fat

0
244e1f82efb3fd15d2da39397488fb24

(549)

on November 27, 2011
at 01:43 AM

Pick up Good Calories, Bad Calories by Gary Taubes. It looks like a thick read, but he literally references everything he states in his book. He apparently is sick of being challenged so everything is just right there in the back. He also wrote "Why We Get Fat." I also highly recommend a read called "The Vegetarian Myth" by Lierre Keith - she goes on about so many things that support meat consumption, it's absolutely amazing. I never looked at soil that way before, lol. She gets into every aspect, including the political/coorporate ones. She will blow your mind. Also, The Obesity Epidemic by Zoe Harcombe. Amazing. Good luck! This is a really controversial topic, and if your teacher is vegan, you're really going to push his buttons. Vegans and vegetarians take their diets so seriously, that when you challenge them, it really does feel like you're challenging their religion. They get soooo upset. I would proceed with extreme caution.

De21ae6fc33a37dabeeff82e361a2488

(10)

on November 27, 2011
at 11:09 AM

thank you i will. My last paper i wrote was about body image in hunter gatherers, and i claimed that humans genetically are supposed to be thin and fit, and she wasnt happy about that. I live and study in israel now and i feel like this is the most vegetarian friendly country in the world. Army service is mandatory and if your a vegetarian or vegan they'll give you the right food, however if your a celiac, you are dismissed, also have of the restaurants here are vegetarian because of kosher reasons.

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