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Is Collagen Hydrolysate a good substitute for protein powder? Take away from Vitamins / Minerals?

Commented on October 29, 2014
Created October 27, 2014 at 4:42 PM

I'm trying to incorporate collagen into my routine for proported joint, skin and adrenal benefits. 

I combined 3oz of grass fed heavy cream, 1/2 oz Great Lakes Collagen, and 16oz unsweetened organic decaf.

It seems like a delicious low-carb meal replacement.

1/2 once of Great Lakes Collagen Hydrolsate contains 25g of protein. 

Can I regard the protein in the collagen just like regular protein?  

Also, I was thinking of trying the Great Lakes Red (un-hydrolsate) because it sounds more paleo (less processed).  Has anyone tried adding that to hot coffee?  It says it might clump in very hot liquids.  My Keurig produces 160 degree coffee. 2 ice cubes drops it down to 140 degrees.

Thanks,

Caveman_Mike

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3 Answers

0
01114547678b001f3e52cc3a9d343fd1

on October 29, 2014
at 06:40 PM

TheGastronomer wrote "There is no proof that gelatin or animal skin that has been properly processed contains any substantial amount of endotoxins. That's an internet myth with zero scientific evidence."

Response: Actually, it's very well known the gelatin powders contain endotoxin. Consult the following  paper:

Development of low endotoxin gelatin for regenerative medicine.

0
Be157308a0438e382b88d9db4c12ab30

on October 27, 2014
at 05:12 PM

It's not a complete protein because it's pretty low in some essential amino acids so you will need another type of protein source to complement it. If you ate collagen (gelatin) alone you would develop an amino acid deficiency over time. Just keep that in mind so you can eat a balanced diet consisting of other protein sources. And by the way, if you want cheap collagen, you could eat pork rinds (which is the same thing that you are eating: animal skin), it's a lot cheaper because it's less processed and way more delicious since it's got a nice crunch and bacon-like taste.

Be157308a0438e382b88d9db4c12ab30

on October 27, 2014
at 05:42 PM

I don't see how the benefit would be diminished by complementing it with another protein, so you shouldn't have to worry about it. Collagen seems to be low in Tryptophan, Methionine, Cystine and Histidine. You could just eat eggs, meat, fish, almonds, cheese, etc... There's a bunch of protein sources that provide some of these missing amino acids, go with what you like. 

You could mix an egg yolk in the cup with the heavy cream (beat it well until throughly mixed) and then slowly pour the boiling coffee into the egg+cream mixture (slowly!!!) as you stir it to prevent curdling of the egg yolk. Tastes just like before but super creamy and custardy. Try it. As a bonus, the boiling hot coffee kills any bacteria that might be hanging out in the egg yolk, so you can feel safe.

7fc82eebafd44badc73c520f44660150

(3275)

on October 27, 2014
at 05:31 PM

Wow!  I'm really glad I asked. Thank you @TheGastronomer!

1. What would I need to add to the 1/2 of collegan to complete it?

2. If I complimented the collegan with some other protein, does that diminish its benefits? 


Thanks,

Caveman_Mike

-1
01114547678b001f3e52cc3a9d343fd1

on October 29, 2014
at 05:32 PM

While gelatin is good, gelatin powder is potentially problematic. To understand this problem, you have to read about endotoxin.

The problem with gelatin powders is that they are made of pig skin, or other parts of the animal which contain bacteria. The bacteria is killed in the process, but remains of bacteria, called endotoxin, stay in the product.

If you are very healthy and have a very good, not permeable gut, your body won't absorb significant endotoxin from the gelatin powder, and you'll likely benefit from consuming the product. However, if you do absorb the endotoxin, it will slow down your metabolism and actually make your gut more permeable. If you for example suddenly start to gain weight after adding gelatin powder, it's likely that you're absorbing too much endotoxin.

I hope some day they create gelatin powders without endotoxin, but as far as I know, they don't exist outside of research environments.

It's safer to eat gelatinous cuts such as oxtail soup, shanks, to avoid the potential endotoxin problem.

Regarding the possibility of creating a amino-acid deficiency, that's extremely unlikely, unless gelatin is your one and only source of protein. If you consume meats, eggs, or milk, they'll provide the remaining amino acids. It's good for an adult to have gelatin in the diet, because adults don't need as much tryptophan as children, and tryptophan is actually the only amino acid that is carcinogenic. 

01114547678b001f3e52cc3a9d343fd1

(-23)

on October 29, 2014
at 06:40 PM

TheGastronomer wrote "There is no proof that gelatin or animal skin that has been properly processed contains any substantial amount of endotoxins. That's an internet myth with zero scientific evidence."

Response: Actually, it's very well known the gelatin powders contain endotoxin. Consult the following  paper:

Development of low endotoxin gelatin for regenerative medicine.

Be157308a0438e382b88d9db4c12ab30

on October 29, 2014
at 05:58 PM

Tryptophan is not carcinogenic in normal, moderate amounts. It is essential to human life, which means humans cannot live without it. Low intake of Tryptophan can cause a person to develop Pellagra, which is a horrible disease.

There is no proof that gelatin or animal skin that has been properly processed contains any substantial amount of endotoxins. That's an internet myth with zero scientific evidence.

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