1

votes

Heat "adaption" + Paleo on Israeltrip

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created August 18, 2012 at 9:25 PM

So we all know about ice cold showers, cold adaption, etc. I have done this the last few months had a lot of success with it. Now I also read, that Wim Hof (the iceman) ran a marathon in the desert without anything to drink. Since I am going to Israel in 2 weeks I want to prepare as much as possible for everything and got interested in how he did that. Is it simple by getting cold "adapted" that you also got more resistant to heat? Does anyone have any extra tips how to prepare for a lot of heat?

And 2nd, since I am already asking, any experience about being Paleo in Israel? Is it easy to stay (at least 80%), also on a Budget? Any tips?

Oh and another thing, will Original Vibram Fivefingers be enough, or should I get a better pair of shoes as well?

Thanks for anyone who finds the time to answer.

F9638b939a6f85d67f60065677193cad

(4266)

on August 20, 2012
at 03:42 PM

A loose men's dress shirt, cotton or poly-cotton, or nylon is fine. Loose nylon pants work well since they are light and dry quickly. I'm thinking of your typical "travel" or hiking pants and shirts, stuff like from ex-officio or rail riders. Jeans and long sleeved cotton t-shirts will be uncomfortable in the desert. Too heavy, holds on to moisture just a little too much.

A50ca1bb3d72544cb50171bd7b46105c

(130)

on August 19, 2012
at 11:18 PM

That is some great input. Thank you. So you mean long trousers and and long sleeved t-shirt instead of shorts and a short t-shirt?

A50ca1bb3d72544cb50171bd7b46105c

(130)

on August 19, 2012
at 12:18 AM

Ah that is some good information. Cheers. The only thing I found (here on paleohacks actually), is http://www.washingtonpost.com/national/health-science/how-your-body-beats-the-heat/2012/05/25/gJQAsvvEqU_graphic.html?hpid=z1 might be of interest for you as well. Have been trying to look some more stuff up about Wim Hof, but I didn't really find much. Apparently he is doing not only the meditation to keep himself warm, but also to keep himself cool (while walking/running), that is about all I found.

A50ca1bb3d72544cb50171bd7b46105c

(130)

on August 18, 2012
at 10:14 PM

Ah that is great to hear. I am actually from London (well, Austria but living in London) and the reason I am going is because of a lovely Jewish friend I made here at University. Her Dad has a house there, so we are going to stay there for a bit and then Couchsurfing in Tel Aviv, Jerusalem and we'll see if we also make it somewhere else (I'd like to see Haifa). You are living in the US now? Anyways, thanks for the tips and any idea about my new question about the Vibrams?

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7 Answers

1
2f13bf7120df869934fc53d4d0c551b9

(10)

on August 19, 2012
at 11:57 PM

If you'd like to be Paleo in Israel - either cook your own food or choose your restaurants carefully:

  • Avoid KOSHER restaurants, they are not allowed to use butter when they serve meat, so the ones which do serve meat, use only vegetable oil (usually Soy/Canola oil) as fat (in deserts, too!)

  • Arab restaurants usually serve good meat at reasonable prices, just skip the PITAH bread and the dips (HUMMUS, TEHINA, etc.)

  • Take into account that frozen meats at Israeli supermarkets are processed with salt and injected with water and some other additives.

  • Seafood and fresh meat of superior quality are rather expensive, but there's an abundance of delicious fruits and vegetables.

Tips for surviving the Israeli summer:

  • Spend as much time as possible in the shade.

  • Drink lots of water (tap water is fine, btw).

  • Avoid large meals. Eat small quantities as often as you need.

  • Sleep at noon, stay awake later at night.

  • Use sunscreen.

1
7278560e76901ded4081022b54c6e165

on August 19, 2012
at 05:27 AM

I am currently in Israel and being Paleo is not hard. You've got markets health food stores, regular supermarkets much like the west but perhaps easier to eat out as you can get Sharwama plates minus the pita along with any kind of salad you fancy. Olives are popular and so is olive oil. You should have no problem with protein and fat intake along with veggies and fruit. The hardest part I would say is the language barrier. Pass that and you are fine. The Israeli typical breakfast usually features eggs if you are staying at a hotel that provides breakfast, skip the bread and hummus but by all means go for the hard boiled eggs, the thing that looks like sour cream is delicious, liberally pour olive oil on your salad, you should be ok. Some also serve cuts of lunch meat (beef or chicken) as well. The cheaper places may only serve pita, eggs, salad, and hummus, along with a cabbage dressing. I never eat that as it uses mayo with sugar I think. The white stuff is dairy, a type of soft cheese very delicious,. Go for that too.

1
A2c38be4c54c91a15071f82f14cac0b3

(12682)

on August 18, 2012
at 09:51 PM

Staying cool in the heat is an issue near and dear to my heart. I've been working outside much of this summer and I'm someone who just really hates the heat. My ancestry is Norwegian. You could put me in a walk in freezer and I'd love it, but if it gets above 90 degrees I'm hot and unhappy. So I looked into this a bit myself.

I found a number of sources, including this study, which suggest vitamin C is beneficial to heat adaptation. Bust out the oranges baybee!

Also, and this may go without saying, but being well hydrated is important when it's hot. Along with this, so are electrolytes.

But this is all I could find. Not exactly the most comprehensive list of tips, but in my experience they help.

A50ca1bb3d72544cb50171bd7b46105c

(130)

on August 19, 2012
at 12:18 AM

Ah that is some good information. Cheers. The only thing I found (here on paleohacks actually), is http://www.washingtonpost.com/national/health-science/how-your-body-beats-the-heat/2012/05/25/gJQAsvvEqU_graphic.html?hpid=z1 might be of interest for you as well. Have been trying to look some more stuff up about Wim Hof, but I didn't really find much. Apparently he is doing not only the meditation to keep himself warm, but also to keep himself cool (while walking/running), that is about all I found.

1
C2dd4d68ae80b4dee68d7cfac2dface2

on August 18, 2012
at 09:37 PM

Hey there, So I am actually originally from israel. At some point I ate completely paleo there for about 2 months, and it is just as easy as in the US if not easier. As far as making food at home goes there is nothing different except the names of the supermarkets and probably the brands of things. With a little looking around and a little figuring out you can find most of what you buy here at the market there, for just about the same price more less. I am not sure how much meat is exactly but veggies I remember are cheaper there. As far as eating out goes, its all about making the right choices and you can eat a good paleo meal in most places. At cafes and restaurants you can usually get most the salads just check what dressing they use and potentially ask for just lemon juice and salt/pepper. Look at the menu though, there might be grilled chicken or steak with veggies and stuff like that or even ommlettes. Also, israels signature food is shawarma and you eat that (without the hummus) with veggies in a plate or a box to go instead of the pita or 'lafa'. Goodluck! are you going on birthright?

A50ca1bb3d72544cb50171bd7b46105c

(130)

on August 18, 2012
at 10:14 PM

Ah that is great to hear. I am actually from London (well, Austria but living in London) and the reason I am going is because of a lovely Jewish friend I made here at University. Her Dad has a house there, so we are going to stay there for a bit and then Couchsurfing in Tel Aviv, Jerusalem and we'll see if we also make it somewhere else (I'd like to see Haifa). You are living in the US now? Anyways, thanks for the tips and any idea about my new question about the Vibrams?

0
F9638b939a6f85d67f60065677193cad

(4266)

on August 19, 2012
at 10:07 PM

I live in Southern California and I hike a lot. How I manage heat is to stay covered up with light loose clothing. There's a reason desert dwellers cover their skin. It may feel hot but it creates a microclimate against your skin that's never going to be much hotter than your own body. It also protects you from the searing radiation of the sun. Your sweat will get into the clothing and when air moves on it, the clothing will cool you off. You can also get your clothing wet to further cool you off. It's good to wear a hat for the same reasons and if you can get your hat wet, that also helps. When I hike I sometimes even put snow in my hat, but snow will be hard to come by in Israel.

A50ca1bb3d72544cb50171bd7b46105c

(130)

on August 19, 2012
at 11:18 PM

That is some great input. Thank you. So you mean long trousers and and long sleeved t-shirt instead of shorts and a short t-shirt?

F9638b939a6f85d67f60065677193cad

(4266)

on August 20, 2012
at 03:42 PM

A loose men's dress shirt, cotton or poly-cotton, or nylon is fine. Loose nylon pants work well since they are light and dry quickly. I'm thinking of your typical "travel" or hiking pants and shirts, stuff like from ex-officio or rail riders. Jeans and long sleeved cotton t-shirts will be uncomfortable in the desert. Too heavy, holds on to moisture just a little too much.

0
Ce41c230e8c2a4295db31aec3ef4b2ab

(32564)

on August 18, 2012
at 11:14 PM

We moved to Santa Fe, NM from the Pac NW last year.

What helped me the most was taking a siesta during the hottest part of the day, staying well-hydrated & eating lots of fat.

0
954837b1c93a2792e95008d94f262c53

(187)

on August 18, 2012
at 09:47 PM

Here's an older post about being Paleo in Israel...can't help you with heat adaption though.

http://paleohacks.com/questions/140168/paleo-diet-and-birthright-trip-in-israel/140170#140170

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