4

votes

Instant coffee unhealthy?

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created January 18, 2012 at 5:53 AM

Hey there,

I am wondering if instant coffee is less healthy than normal coffee?! If yes why and how bad is it?!

TY from Germany!

Steve

A3c56c85290f748410a6f340ddd552b3

(321)

on September 14, 2012
at 02:59 AM

Nothing will ever match the taste and aroma of my "crack" of 10 years ago: General Foods International Coffees. Yum. I don't miss bread but I miss that (actual) crap.

0382fa263de4c83328dc34a56e25437f

(4238)

on September 13, 2012
at 07:37 PM

I second the Mt. Hagen suggestion -- it's the best option for a less-than-optimal way of having coffee.

D31a2a2d43191b15ca4a1c7ec7d03038

(4134)

on February 16, 2012
at 10:41 PM

Ashley, thanks for the suggestion. I'm going to try it! :)

F2cd77a6d2133ca3ae5b4353c4047577

on February 10, 2012
at 07:15 PM

And if you aren't convinced, this study has been cited 179 times and gives a fantastic introduction to ochratoxin A toxicity in humans, as well as recommendations that the PTWI be decreased substantially. http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/mnfr.200600137/abstract

F2cd77a6d2133ca3ae5b4353c4047577

on February 10, 2012
at 07:11 PM

Just bothered to check this. Did you forget to divide by 1000 somewhere along the way? The PTWI given implies that daily tolerable intake of Ochratoxin A is ~14 ng/kg. Last time I checked, that was 0.014 ng/g and the bottom of the concentration range of the instant coffee samples analyzed in the study was 0.17 ng/g. Can I have my +1 back now?

C97a6302e6cd99a6798658559eb37148

(63)

on January 20, 2012
at 08:15 AM

But of course I also would favorize the fresh brewed.

C97a6302e6cd99a6798658559eb37148

(63)

on January 20, 2012
at 08:14 AM

The falavor of several brands is quite good.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on January 19, 2012
at 12:16 PM

The dose makes the poison and there's no evidence that this dose is significantly problematic. In fact, if anything, the article itself points out how small of a dose this really is! Now, do some homework and show that this dose of a nanograms per day has significant detrimental effects, and then we can talk about being concerned about mycotoxins in instant coffee.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on January 19, 2012
at 02:13 AM

That's the word on the street. No experience with the new stuff myself, I stick to fresh brewed.

F2cd77a6d2133ca3ae5b4353c4047577

on January 18, 2012
at 11:58 PM

I never said that I agreed with the definition of "provisional tolerable weekly intake" as defined in the study. I think many would concur that some of the bodies governing nutrition in our world set a rather low bar on toxicity in foods for the sake of a company's bottom line. I only cite the study as definitive proof of the presence of mycotoxins in instant coffee.

27361737e33ba2f73ab3c25d2699ad61

(1880)

on January 18, 2012
at 11:35 PM

You guessed incorrectly. However, I'm glad you'd MUCH rather get your soluble fiber from veggies...more coffee for me.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on January 18, 2012
at 11:31 PM

Really? Did you just read the abstract and think it sounded scary? The amount here is tiny, and assuming 5 cups of instant coffee per day, the mean value would have only accounted for 1% of the "provisional tolerable weekly intake".

F2cd77a6d2133ca3ae5b4353c4047577

on January 18, 2012
at 10:58 PM

I'm guessing you got this from the Livestrong content farm. If you read the study referenced, it only shows that the mice fed soluble fiber recovered faster from endotoxin-induced illness than mice fed insoluble fiber. No controls to speak of. I would note, additionally, that it would seem that the immunoregulatory effect of soluble fiber has more to do with the fact that it feeds gut flora. So, in that respect, you're correct. But -- I'd MUCH rather get my soluble fiber from fresh veges to promote the antiinflammatory processes of interleukins.

27361737e33ba2f73ab3c25d2699ad61

(1880)

on January 18, 2012
at 10:24 PM

There are also the usual anti-constipation benefits -- yes, I consider this also to be a health benefit.

27361737e33ba2f73ab3c25d2699ad61

(1880)

on January 18, 2012
at 10:22 PM

Soluble fiber may strengthen immune system by increasing interleukin-4.

F2cd77a6d2133ca3ae5b4353c4047577

on January 18, 2012
at 05:33 PM

Fiber? Huh? And this implies some sort of health benefit?

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on January 18, 2012
at 12:08 PM

If you were trying to eliminate all food that have potentially harmful compounds in them, you'd be eating nothing. The dose makes the poison.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on January 18, 2012
at 11:39 AM

No solvents, just spray drying. And a bajillion other folks who don't feel funny drinking it, just don't have paleo hypochondria.

Bf57bcbdc19d4f1728599053acd020ab

(5043)

on January 18, 2012
at 08:34 AM

I have no evidence to back this up but I heard it is made with inferior beans. It makes my DH jittery but he's fine with espresso. I won't touch the stuff.

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12 Answers

6
Ca2c940a1947e6200883908592956680

(8574)

on January 18, 2012
at 09:48 AM

From what I understand instant coffee is just brewed coffee that is then spray dried and collected. Basically you are just rehydrating a cup of already made coffee.

You can find some very good instant out there if you look. I am trying a can of instant Percol Black & Beyond Espresso this month, as it has been released recently. I normally buy real double espresso from the cafe but have cut it to one in the morning and then instant in the afternoon. Saves me ??1.50 a day.

6
6b8d12fc3e43179f9ae1765a4d1a9dc2

(5914)

on January 18, 2012
at 08:08 AM

Yes! Instant coffee was invented by the devil to punish the lazy!

4
27361737e33ba2f73ab3c25d2699ad61

(1880)

on January 18, 2012
at 05:04 PM

Instant coffee contains more soluble fiber than espresso or drip. Germany has a terrific instant coffee called Mount Hagen. It's also widely available in the US. We enjoy Mount Hagen Organic Instant Caffeinated as well the DeCaffeinated versions. Of course fresh brewed organic coffee or espresso are also delicious and healthy.

Here's one link but there are many others regarding fiber in coffee -- just google it.

http://www.coffee-tea.co.uk/dietary-fiber-coffee.php

27361737e33ba2f73ab3c25d2699ad61

(1880)

on January 18, 2012
at 10:22 PM

Soluble fiber may strengthen immune system by increasing interleukin-4.

F2cd77a6d2133ca3ae5b4353c4047577

on January 18, 2012
at 05:33 PM

Fiber? Huh? And this implies some sort of health benefit?

27361737e33ba2f73ab3c25d2699ad61

(1880)

on January 18, 2012
at 11:35 PM

You guessed incorrectly. However, I'm glad you'd MUCH rather get your soluble fiber from veggies...more coffee for me.

27361737e33ba2f73ab3c25d2699ad61

(1880)

on January 18, 2012
at 10:24 PM

There are also the usual anti-constipation benefits -- yes, I consider this also to be a health benefit.

F2cd77a6d2133ca3ae5b4353c4047577

on January 18, 2012
at 10:58 PM

I'm guessing you got this from the Livestrong content farm. If you read the study referenced, it only shows that the mice fed soluble fiber recovered faster from endotoxin-induced illness than mice fed insoluble fiber. No controls to speak of. I would note, additionally, that it would seem that the immunoregulatory effect of soluble fiber has more to do with the fact that it feeds gut flora. So, in that respect, you're correct. But -- I'd MUCH rather get my soluble fiber from fresh veges to promote the antiinflammatory processes of interleukins.

0382fa263de4c83328dc34a56e25437f

(4238)

on September 13, 2012
at 07:37 PM

I second the Mt. Hagen suggestion -- it's the best option for a less-than-optimal way of having coffee.

2
1da74185531d6d4c7182fb9ee417f97f

on January 18, 2012
at 05:11 PM

How about cold brewing instead of instant? It's less acidic, just as easy and quick to prepare, you only have to make it every 1-2 weeks, and you can use the best quality beans instead of the utter shite they use for instant. http://www.squidoo.com/cold_brew_coffee

It also makes a fantastic iced coffee mixed with some coconut milk. :-)

D31a2a2d43191b15ca4a1c7ec7d03038

(4134)

on February 16, 2012
at 10:41 PM

Ashley, thanks for the suggestion. I'm going to try it! :)

1
5e36f73c3f95eb4ea13a009f4936449f

(8280)

on January 19, 2012
at 12:42 AM

Has instant coffee advanced over the years? My recollection from waaay back when was that it was the flavor that'd kill you, not the contents.

C97a6302e6cd99a6798658559eb37148

(63)

on January 20, 2012
at 08:14 AM

The falavor of several brands is quite good.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on January 19, 2012
at 02:13 AM

That's the word on the street. No experience with the new stuff myself, I stick to fresh brewed.

C97a6302e6cd99a6798658559eb37148

(63)

on January 20, 2012
at 08:15 AM

But of course I also would favorize the fresh brewed.

1
F2cd77a6d2133ca3ae5b4353c4047577

on January 18, 2012
at 03:49 PM

I'd be worried about fungal mycotoxins more than anything else.

Mycotoxin Content of Instant Coffee in Brazilian Markets

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on January 18, 2012
at 11:31 PM

Really? Did you just read the abstract and think it sounded scary? The amount here is tiny, and assuming 5 cups of instant coffee per day, the mean value would have only accounted for 1% of the "provisional tolerable weekly intake".

F2cd77a6d2133ca3ae5b4353c4047577

on January 18, 2012
at 11:58 PM

I never said that I agreed with the definition of "provisional tolerable weekly intake" as defined in the study. I think many would concur that some of the bodies governing nutrition in our world set a rather low bar on toxicity in foods for the sake of a company's bottom line. I only cite the study as definitive proof of the presence of mycotoxins in instant coffee.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on January 19, 2012
at 12:16 PM

The dose makes the poison and there's no evidence that this dose is significantly problematic. In fact, if anything, the article itself points out how small of a dose this really is! Now, do some homework and show that this dose of a nanograms per day has significant detrimental effects, and then we can talk about being concerned about mycotoxins in instant coffee.

F2cd77a6d2133ca3ae5b4353c4047577

on February 10, 2012
at 07:11 PM

Just bothered to check this. Did you forget to divide by 1000 somewhere along the way? The PTWI given implies that daily tolerable intake of Ochratoxin A is ~14 ng/kg. Last time I checked, that was 0.014 ng/g and the bottom of the concentration range of the instant coffee samples analyzed in the study was 0.17 ng/g. Can I have my +1 back now?

F2cd77a6d2133ca3ae5b4353c4047577

on February 10, 2012
at 07:15 PM

And if you aren't convinced, this study has been cited 179 times and gives a fantastic introduction to ochratoxin A toxicity in humans, as well as recommendations that the PTWI be decreased substantially. http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/mnfr.200600137/abstract

1
6cdc6b1e75690cfcc4804a6c9eaa910a

(2171)

on January 18, 2012
at 09:06 AM

I would re-iterate Knarf. In a choice of real vs processed, then I go for real every time I can. With a whole coffee bean, you get exactly what you see, a whole coffee bean. With a spoonful of freeze-dried granules, you can never be entirely sure what you are getting. If real coffee is not available though, I don't think instant coffee is going to do you that much harm...just not completely Paleo-ideal. If we were going there then I guess we'd chew on the leaves and eat the beans straight from roasting over our own open fire...

1
Bfa1c9eacfc94a1b62f3a39b574480c6

(3700)

on January 18, 2012
at 08:55 AM

Health-wise, the dose makes the poison. It is a processed product. I do recall feeling funny when drinking it on an empty stomach. There may be use of nasty organic solvents in order for them to make it a powdery crystallized consistency. Why not just drink real coffee? The difference is 4 minutes.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on January 18, 2012
at 11:39 AM

No solvents, just spray drying. And a bajillion other folks who don't feel funny drinking it, just don't have paleo hypochondria.

0
77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on November 27, 2012
at 07:51 PM

Organo gold coffee is healthy for you. http://mycapturepage.com/cp23.php?id=470

0
A1da97aec85dbdc832053408e1002a2c

on September 13, 2012
at 02:36 PM

I think instant may be better, health wise, as it seems to have less acid and less bitter oils. Nothing will match the taste and aroma of a good quality cup of fresh brewed however.

A3c56c85290f748410a6f340ddd552b3

(321)

on September 14, 2012
at 02:59 AM

Nothing will ever match the taste and aroma of my "crack" of 10 years ago: General Foods International Coffees. Yum. I don't miss bread but I miss that (actual) crap.

0
F040035b2008ec80b205481afbd39ad4

on January 18, 2012
at 11:42 AM

AFAIK the most harmful component in baked goods (and particularly crisps, instant coffee, and substitute coffee products), is acrylamide which has caused a LOT of concern in the food industry.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on January 18, 2012
at 12:08 PM

If you were trying to eliminate all food that have potentially harmful compounds in them, you'd be eating nothing. The dose makes the poison.

-1
Medium avatar

on January 18, 2012
at 11:59 PM

Is it not usually the case that "instant" correlates with "processed"? There are exceptions, however. Earlier today I consumed an instant food item called an apple, which was growing on a tree. (OK, maybe an apple can be said to be "processed by nature...")

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