2

votes

Does drinking Coffee during a IF ruin the effects?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created July 29, 2010 at 5:12 PM

On days that I am Fasting, I still drink a cup or two of coffee. Is this ruining the effects of my fast?

50637dfd7dc7a7e811d82283f4f5fd10

(5838)

on May 02, 2011
at 04:39 PM

Since I have asked this question, I have really toned down my coffee consumption, with positive benefits. I wont avoid a cup, but I surely don't make it part of my routine anymore.

9205855633f4d88fd78339aad4fc54ff

on January 28, 2011
at 06:04 PM

thanks Chris for sharing that slide.

84666a86108dee8d11cbbc85b6382083

(2399)

on August 02, 2010
at 11:37 AM

Any particular effects that you have in mind ?

70d9359a2086e890a4c3bccb2ba8a8cb

(2254)

on August 01, 2010
at 05:42 AM

Thanks for the explanation Will :)

485bcefe7f1f7a6df1a293a826bf6137

(2191)

on July 31, 2010
at 03:27 AM

@Chris: I read about how repeated ingestion of stimulants like caffeine wear out the adrenals, so decided to go decaf. I know it has chemicals. I'm impatient to lose weight and it helps me with cravings. Once I'm down to my goal I'll cut probably cut back on decaf, too.

1a8020e101199de55c1b3b726f342321

(1973)

on July 30, 2010
at 09:35 PM

How is it not? A hundred calories or so of fatty acids is not going to significantly shift my metabolism from 'fasting'.

F8fa4b0809d3b74fcf0361c0d53b60c1

(911)

on July 30, 2010
at 03:22 PM

This is physiological insulin insensitivity, an adaptive mechanism designed to spare glucose utilization by non-necessary tissues when fat is available. Once you do eventually ingest carbohydrates, you will require slightly more insulin to get the signal across, but your body will still respond rapidly to store glucose. In pathological insulin resistance, insulin will skyrocket and still be unable to clear glucose from the bloodstream. Welcome to the metabolic syndrome.

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19235)

on July 30, 2010
at 01:58 PM

I am confused, how is it fasting if you are drinking heavy cream?

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19235)

on July 30, 2010
at 01:56 PM

How is it fasting if you are drinking heavy cream?

5de2fffda92c0bf2be7ede10cad55546

(1781)

on July 30, 2010
at 11:54 AM

Thanks for the link Chris. Very interesting study. You're right about the sugar as well.

5de2fffda92c0bf2be7ede10cad55546

(1781)

on July 30, 2010
at 11:51 AM

Butter, interesting, must try that. Great way to add a bit more lovely healthy fat into the diet. Thanks.

62ed65f3596aa2f62fa1d58a0c09f8c3

(20807)

on July 30, 2010
at 04:44 AM

Must be complicated. Cuz supposedly low carb diets improve resting blood glucose levels by quite a bit, which insinuates increased insulin sensitivity.

1a8020e101199de55c1b3b726f342321

(1973)

on July 30, 2010
at 02:50 AM

Cortisol rise probably related to GNG http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11724664

100fd85230060e754fc13394eee6d6f1

(18696)

on July 29, 2010
at 10:11 PM

Even a long-term ketogenic diet reduces insulin sensitivity. That's why if you are on a low carb diet you have to up your carbs for 3 days before a glucose tolerance test. I think whether decreased insulin sensitivity is good or bad depends on context.

691f120a3e7a1a036845d105d86c99a3

(3641)

on July 29, 2010
at 09:56 PM

thanks Chris, very interesting. I like the ending... answer = Decaf! Although I believe the process by which one renders coffee decaf involves some interesting non-paleo chemicals. having just had an espresso and a 12oz coffee i will have to go with the lesser of two evils here. just hope it doesn't sidetrack my 'abs by 30' goal...

70d9359a2086e890a4c3bccb2ba8a8cb

(2254)

on July 29, 2010
at 08:43 PM

*Decreases* insulin sensitivity? Surely that would be bad...

1a8020e101199de55c1b3b726f342321

(1973)

on July 29, 2010
at 08:27 PM

MikeD: see the ppt I updated my answer with.

1a8020e101199de55c1b3b726f342321

(1973)

on July 29, 2010
at 08:23 PM

It seems positive http://care.diabetesjournals.org/content/27/12/2990.full

1a8020e101199de55c1b3b726f342321

(1973)

on July 29, 2010
at 08:21 PM

Why are you guys drinking decaf?

1a8020e101199de55c1b3b726f342321

(1973)

on July 29, 2010
at 08:20 PM

This idea that IF or caffeine causes excess cortisol release is not really supported by the literature, I would not worry about it.

70d9359a2086e890a4c3bccb2ba8a8cb

(2254)

on July 29, 2010
at 07:59 PM

Hmmm... I wonder if this effect of adding the cream might be put to good use for those (like me) who want to avoid excessive cortisol release caused by fasting + caffeine? (as the cortisol would itself be counterproductive to fat loss, among other things)

70d9359a2086e890a4c3bccb2ba8a8cb

(2254)

on July 29, 2010
at 07:57 PM

Testing your blood sugar would only show if there is a spike in blood glucose, not insulin, which is what coffee is suggested (by some) to affect. If coffee does cause an insulin increase, you'd actually expect to see a decrease (although perhaps very small) in blood glucose as a direct effect of this, assuming an insulin sensitive individual.

F8fa4b0809d3b74fcf0361c0d53b60c1

(911)

on July 29, 2010
at 07:54 PM

Coffee increases levels of catecholamines, which releases free fatty acids into the bloodstream, which causes cells to preferentially use that as fuel instead of glucose (e.g. decreases insulin sensitivity). Nothing to worry about.

0fb8b3d6dcfb279b0f7e050d2d22510f

(4645)

on July 29, 2010
at 07:18 PM

Decaffing coffee beans (even water style) using solvents repeatedly on the bean.

485bcefe7f1f7a6df1a293a826bf6137

(2191)

on July 29, 2010
at 06:27 PM

Ditto. Decaf + heavy cream during IF and still losing weight.

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14 Answers

3
9bc6f3df8db981f67ea1465411958c8d

on July 31, 2010
at 03:06 AM

Am I the only one against drinking coffee at all on the Paleo diet?

To me it seems as if everybody is drinking large amounts of this stimulant and diuretic and my idea of it has long been negative, even before paleo. I see people addicted to their cup of coffee in the morning and I can't see the positive in that. After all a stimulant is borrowed energy and it has to be given back.

Anyway, I don't have the science behind coffee but my gut feeling tells me not to touch it, heck even on a standard american diet I didn't think of coffee as healthy.

Wouldn't having coffee during a fast a potential risk for elevated cortisol?

50637dfd7dc7a7e811d82283f4f5fd10

(5838)

on May 02, 2011
at 04:39 PM

Since I have asked this question, I have really toned down my coffee consumption, with positive benefits. I wont avoid a cup, but I surely don't make it part of my routine anymore.

3
8347d512bca9b034d53da40dab8cd21c

on July 29, 2010
at 08:29 PM

I've been drinking coffee black for months now, and regularly have it during fasts. I have not seen any negative effects whatsoever. If there are positive effects, I haven't really seen those either, FWIW.

I agree with many others -- enjoy the coffee and 86 the sugar. A good quality cup of joe requires nothing in it but coffee.

3
0fb8b3d6dcfb279b0f7e050d2d22510f

(4645)

on July 29, 2010
at 07:20 PM

Drink your coffee... pour me a cup.

3
07ca188c8dac3a17f629dd87198d2098

(7970)

on July 29, 2010
at 05:58 PM

I drink decaf with heavy cream, even during IF.

Does it ruin my IF? Not hardly. Does it decrease the effectiveness? Possibly.

I've been doing sporadic fasting the last week or so (except not skipping my decaf + cream), and my scale has been moving down, which is precisely the effect I'm looking for. Could it have moved further than it has in the same time? Maybe, but I don't think it's making a huge difference.

485bcefe7f1f7a6df1a293a826bf6137

(2191)

on July 29, 2010
at 06:27 PM

Ditto. Decaf + heavy cream during IF and still losing weight.

485bcefe7f1f7a6df1a293a826bf6137

(2191)

on July 31, 2010
at 03:27 AM

@Chris: I read about how repeated ingestion of stimulants like caffeine wear out the adrenals, so decided to go decaf. I know it has chemicals. I'm impatient to lose weight and it helps me with cravings. Once I'm down to my goal I'll cut probably cut back on decaf, too.

0fb8b3d6dcfb279b0f7e050d2d22510f

(4645)

on July 29, 2010
at 07:18 PM

Decaffing coffee beans (even water style) using solvents repeatedly on the bean.

1a8020e101199de55c1b3b726f342321

(1973)

on July 29, 2010
at 08:21 PM

Why are you guys drinking decaf?

1
5de2fffda92c0bf2be7ede10cad55546

(1781)

on July 30, 2010
at 11:49 AM

To be pedantic anything eaten, with the exception of water, breaks the fast and some even advocate a "dry fast", no water. However coffee with a small amount of cream doesn't seem to affect anything in my experience. I tend to alternate between regular and decaf during the day and some days only decaf to reduce the habituation and withdrawal effects. I like to have a coffee before a workout, I think it helps effort but can't be sure. I fast daily and eat in a narrow window around 6pm and a couple of coffees or decafs and cream during the day make this WOE effortless.

1
A68f24168bc0de414a038037e287b581

on July 29, 2010
at 08:37 PM

I don't eat sweets, no cookies, cakes or chips... Coffee with heavy cream (and recently also with added butter - so good!) is really my only "dessert"... I am not cutting it back :) It's such important part of my daily routine, that I really can't imagine not drinking it - even when I fast. I also wouldn't want to stress my mind during fasting by denying the caffeine it's probably at least mildly addicted to.

As a matter of fact, I am planning on having one now. It's late so decaf. :)

5de2fffda92c0bf2be7ede10cad55546

(1781)

on July 30, 2010
at 11:51 AM

Butter, interesting, must try that. Great way to add a bit more lovely healthy fat into the diet. Thanks.

1
1a8020e101199de55c1b3b726f342321

(1973)

on July 29, 2010
at 05:16 PM

No.

I regularly consume coffee with a fair amount of heavy cream during my fasts.

In theory this might say shift my metabolism for the next hour or two to burning the fats from the heavy cream, but counter balanced again the thermogenic properties of coffee/caffeine...

It is the sugar you want to avoid.

Here is what seems to be a fairly good review of the mechanisms of action of coffee/caffeine on obese and non-obese individuals:

http://coffeescience.org/ppt/CoffeeCaffeineInsulinResistance.ppt

5de2fffda92c0bf2be7ede10cad55546

(1781)

on July 30, 2010
at 11:54 AM

Thanks for the link Chris. Very interesting study. You're right about the sugar as well.

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19235)

on July 30, 2010
at 01:58 PM

I am confused, how is it fasting if you are drinking heavy cream?

1a8020e101199de55c1b3b726f342321

(1973)

on July 29, 2010
at 08:20 PM

This idea that IF or caffeine causes excess cortisol release is not really supported by the literature, I would not worry about it.

1a8020e101199de55c1b3b726f342321

(1973)

on July 30, 2010
at 02:50 AM

Cortisol rise probably related to GNG http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11724664

1a8020e101199de55c1b3b726f342321

(1973)

on July 30, 2010
at 09:35 PM

How is it not? A hundred calories or so of fatty acids is not going to significantly shift my metabolism from 'fasting'.

70d9359a2086e890a4c3bccb2ba8a8cb

(2254)

on July 29, 2010
at 07:59 PM

Hmmm... I wonder if this effect of adding the cream might be put to good use for those (like me) who want to avoid excessive cortisol release caused by fasting + caffeine? (as the cortisol would itself be counterproductive to fat loss, among other things)

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19235)

on July 30, 2010
at 01:56 PM

How is it fasting if you are drinking heavy cream?

9205855633f4d88fd78339aad4fc54ff

on January 28, 2011
at 06:04 PM

thanks Chris for sharing that slide.

0
705e66484ed64fe8e188123de398413e

on February 27, 2013
at 01:27 AM

Not if it's BULLETPROOF!

0
4d4cfa1007b063ed4b62880da8597d59

on February 26, 2013
at 05:51 PM

If I couldn't have coffee or tea during a fast I probably wouldn't be able to stick with the fast. I need at least one thing with flavor and it's better than sugary juices.

0
1153fbd07055edb0b729e2249f455477

(-48)

on November 28, 2012
at 05:50 PM

no it dosent. Try out organo gold. its the best during fasting http://mycapturepage.com/cp23.php?id=470

0
C42ec1b9c972008682ba6f0a1c1df165

on August 28, 2012
at 10:18 PM

I fast using only a little coffee and chewing sugarless bubblegum. Works like a charm.

0
95ab15c8ef50ff0daf87ccbdd52cd3b8

(2384)

on July 30, 2010
at 12:56 PM

I drink black coffee (and/or black iced tea) a few times a day every day, IF or no IF. Hasn't slowed me down any as far as I can tell.

0
691f120a3e7a1a036845d105d86c99a3

(3641)

on July 29, 2010
at 06:29 PM

If the desired effect is detoxifying or clearing one's mind of the effects of various foods then perhaps coffee should be avoided for those reasons.

I seem pretty successful fasting with coffee for fat reduction. I'd love for someone to post some research on the effects of coffee on insulin. I suppose I could monitor my blood sugar or something after my cup of joe although if I am ingesting very low carb anyway would the spike really do anything anyway? hmm, this looks like more of a question to ask.

70d9359a2086e890a4c3bccb2ba8a8cb

(2254)

on July 29, 2010
at 07:57 PM

Testing your blood sugar would only show if there is a spike in blood glucose, not insulin, which is what coffee is suggested (by some) to affect. If coffee does cause an insulin increase, you'd actually expect to see a decrease (although perhaps very small) in blood glucose as a direct effect of this, assuming an insulin sensitive individual.

691f120a3e7a1a036845d105d86c99a3

(3641)

on July 29, 2010
at 09:56 PM

thanks Chris, very interesting. I like the ending... answer = Decaf! Although I believe the process by which one renders coffee decaf involves some interesting non-paleo chemicals. having just had an espresso and a 12oz coffee i will have to go with the lesser of two evils here. just hope it doesn't sidetrack my 'abs by 30' goal...

1a8020e101199de55c1b3b726f342321

(1973)

on July 29, 2010
at 08:27 PM

MikeD: see the ppt I updated my answer with.

0
35a9207254408c6907f7082640c7bfaa

(822)

on July 29, 2010
at 05:52 PM

Some studies show that coffee affects insulin, which I suppose shouldn't be surprising given how many other physiological effects coffee has.

Personally I love the effects of caffeine and the evidence that it causes any kind of problems is weak so I say drink away. Having something flavorful makes it a lot easier to fast.

70d9359a2086e890a4c3bccb2ba8a8cb

(2254)

on July 29, 2010
at 08:43 PM

*Decreases* insulin sensitivity? Surely that would be bad...

F8fa4b0809d3b74fcf0361c0d53b60c1

(911)

on July 29, 2010
at 07:54 PM

Coffee increases levels of catecholamines, which releases free fatty acids into the bloodstream, which causes cells to preferentially use that as fuel instead of glucose (e.g. decreases insulin sensitivity). Nothing to worry about.

62ed65f3596aa2f62fa1d58a0c09f8c3

(20807)

on July 30, 2010
at 04:44 AM

Must be complicated. Cuz supposedly low carb diets improve resting blood glucose levels by quite a bit, which insinuates increased insulin sensitivity.

1a8020e101199de55c1b3b726f342321

(1973)

on July 29, 2010
at 08:23 PM

It seems positive http://care.diabetesjournals.org/content/27/12/2990.full

100fd85230060e754fc13394eee6d6f1

(18696)

on July 29, 2010
at 10:11 PM

Even a long-term ketogenic diet reduces insulin sensitivity. That's why if you are on a low carb diet you have to up your carbs for 3 days before a glucose tolerance test. I think whether decreased insulin sensitivity is good or bad depends on context.

F8fa4b0809d3b74fcf0361c0d53b60c1

(911)

on July 30, 2010
at 03:22 PM

This is physiological insulin insensitivity, an adaptive mechanism designed to spare glucose utilization by non-necessary tissues when fat is available. Once you do eventually ingest carbohydrates, you will require slightly more insulin to get the signal across, but your body will still respond rapidly to store glucose. In pathological insulin resistance, insulin will skyrocket and still be unable to clear glucose from the bloodstream. Welcome to the metabolic syndrome.

70d9359a2086e890a4c3bccb2ba8a8cb

(2254)

on August 01, 2010
at 05:42 AM

Thanks for the explanation Will :)

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