5

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Does anyone know of CLINICAL studies that show benefits or issues with drinking coffee?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created October 05, 2011 at 8:13 AM

I enjoy drinking coffee and was often see links to studies on paleo blogs about how it does a multitude of great things. However, when I follow the links the studies all point to OBSERVATIONAL studies. I've been following Tom Naughton and am reading Bad Science right now and so know that these studies really don't tell me anything reliable here.

Interesting to see that studies against showing issues with paleo are scrutinised to the hilt whereas perhaps those supporting it: not so much.

I'd love to believe it's beneficial for us, but would like to see the data to back it up. Anyone know of any good clinical studies regarding this?

6714718e2245e5190017d643a7614157

on February 23, 2012
at 01:28 AM

I guess I need to start drinking coffee again.

03f5a69fde4012b827ebdb6d93b71e7a

(2007)

on November 22, 2011
at 10:43 PM

But if you look at the full explanation, it is pointing out the problems with "additives" like artificial sweeteners: http://primalmd.tumblr.com/post/6397186790/evidence-based-practice-coffee#additives Guessing that most of us here are more on the "pastured heavy whipping cream" or "additive-free coconut milk" spectrum...

Medium avatar

(19469)

on October 05, 2011
at 08:57 PM

No worries Eric :) I just wanted to clarify that I was neutral on the topic of coffee consumption. I too donate blood regularly and on a purely subjective level, "feel better", because of it. I do think that the phytic acid content of coffee should be recognized and its potential impact on mineral absorption at least considered. If we are going to rail against grains for their nutrient-binding effects, we should not blind ourselves to the same process in other "paleo friendly" foods and drinks.

1d0497f8781845ab371b479455bfee8e

(11157)

on October 05, 2011
at 08:46 PM

I donate blood every 21 days ;)

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on October 05, 2011
at 06:20 PM

High iron levels are good for females, premenopausal.

77ecc37f89dbe8f783179323916bd8e6

(5002)

on October 05, 2011
at 06:06 PM

Totally totally - sry if I sounded combative - just adding to the pile of thoughts and info :)

Medium avatar

(19469)

on October 05, 2011
at 05:42 PM

The question was "Anyone know of any good clinical studies". I am neither defending or advocating the consumption of coffee.

Medium avatar

(19469)

on October 05, 2011
at 05:40 PM

Also, the question was "Anyone know of any good clinical studies". I am neither defending or advocating the consumption of coffee.

Medium avatar

(19469)

on October 05, 2011
at 05:39 PM

Is coffee inhibiting JUST iron absorption or are other minerals affected? This isn't addressed in the study, but is my concern. I donate blood for the reasons you listed, so I am personally not worried about iron malabsorption, but how many people drink coffee with their breakfast? How many people take their daily multivitamin/supplements with breakfast? Quite a few. So, this should be at least considered.

77ecc37f89dbe8f783179323916bd8e6

(5002)

on October 05, 2011
at 04:53 PM

FED: then again, high iron levels could be an issue for some paleos. Kresser's latest podcast is about this, though I haven't finished it yet. Like John Durant, Kresser thinks that donating blood is a good idea for some people bc it allows us to flush accumulated iron.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on October 05, 2011
at 01:56 PM

That is correct, BUT, you don't have to drink coffee after meal.

0e395acc856e3353f3f5892e6b09b0e7

(1227)

on October 05, 2011
at 01:53 PM

Thank you for this link Eric, I found it very helpful, but was disappointed that it indicated best to drink coffee black to get benefits. I like my coffee best as a cream delivery system.

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9 Answers

2
0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19235)

on October 05, 2011
at 05:35 PM

The Wikipedia page on the health effects of coffee is a good place to start as it has quite a number of links to research studies.

The number of clinical studies on coffee are rather few in number. This is mainly due to the fact that most of the potential risks and benefits of coffee consumption only appear over the course of many years. Clinical studies are usually short in duration due to their costs.

This is currently my favorite coffee related study:

Impact of coffee consumption on the gut microbiota: a human volunteer study.*

The impact of a moderate consumption of an instant coffee on the general composition of the human intestinal bacterial population was assessed in this study. Sixteen (16) healthy adult volunteers consumed a daily dose of 3 cups of coffee during 3 weeks

Our results show that the consumption of the coffee preparation resulting from water co-extraction of green and roasted coffee beans produce an increase in the metabolic activity and/or numbers of the Bifidobacterium spp. population, a bacterial group of reputed beneficial effects, without major impact on the dominant microbiota.

So drink coffee to feed your "friendly bacteria" :)

*The study was funded by Nestle who produce a lot of instant coffee.

6714718e2245e5190017d643a7614157

on February 23, 2012
at 01:28 AM

I guess I need to start drinking coffee again.

2
77ecc37f89dbe8f783179323916bd8e6

(5002)

on October 05, 2011
at 01:20 PM

0e395acc856e3353f3f5892e6b09b0e7

(1227)

on October 05, 2011
at 01:53 PM

Thank you for this link Eric, I found it very helpful, but was disappointed that it indicated best to drink coffee black to get benefits. I like my coffee best as a cream delivery system.

03f5a69fde4012b827ebdb6d93b71e7a

(2007)

on November 22, 2011
at 10:43 PM

But if you look at the full explanation, it is pointing out the problems with "additives" like artificial sweeteners: http://primalmd.tumblr.com/post/6397186790/evidence-based-practice-coffee#additives Guessing that most of us here are more on the "pastured heavy whipping cream" or "additive-free coconut milk" spectrum...

1
2c2349bc7af0fedb59a5fe99dac9fae2

(2707)

on October 05, 2011
at 03:48 PM

Here's one study showing that coffee-derived mannooligosaccharides enhances fat loss

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21938072

1
Medium avatar

(19469)

on October 05, 2011
at 01:39 PM

Here's a study linking iron malabsorption to coffee. I would assume that it is due to the phytic acid content and would also apply to other minerals.

http://www.ajcn.org/content/37/3/416.abstract?ijkey=f63b84e86ae3b7e451190f577cb7de8cdf66b4d0&keytype2=tf_ipsecsha

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on October 05, 2011
at 01:56 PM

That is correct, BUT, you don't have to drink coffee after meal.

Medium avatar

(19469)

on October 05, 2011
at 05:39 PM

Is coffee inhibiting JUST iron absorption or are other minerals affected? This isn't addressed in the study, but is my concern. I donate blood for the reasons you listed, so I am personally not worried about iron malabsorption, but how many people drink coffee with their breakfast? How many people take their daily multivitamin/supplements with breakfast? Quite a few. So, this should be at least considered.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on October 05, 2011
at 06:20 PM

High iron levels are good for females, premenopausal.

Medium avatar

(19469)

on October 05, 2011
at 08:57 PM

No worries Eric :) I just wanted to clarify that I was neutral on the topic of coffee consumption. I too donate blood regularly and on a purely subjective level, "feel better", because of it. I do think that the phytic acid content of coffee should be recognized and its potential impact on mineral absorption at least considered. If we are going to rail against grains for their nutrient-binding effects, we should not blind ourselves to the same process in other "paleo friendly" foods and drinks.

Medium avatar

(19469)

on October 05, 2011
at 05:42 PM

The question was "Anyone know of any good clinical studies". I am neither defending or advocating the consumption of coffee.

77ecc37f89dbe8f783179323916bd8e6

(5002)

on October 05, 2011
at 04:53 PM

FED: then again, high iron levels could be an issue for some paleos. Kresser's latest podcast is about this, though I haven't finished it yet. Like John Durant, Kresser thinks that donating blood is a good idea for some people bc it allows us to flush accumulated iron.

Medium avatar

(19469)

on October 05, 2011
at 05:40 PM

Also, the question was "Anyone know of any good clinical studies". I am neither defending or advocating the consumption of coffee.

1d0497f8781845ab371b479455bfee8e

(11157)

on October 05, 2011
at 08:46 PM

I donate blood every 21 days ;)

77ecc37f89dbe8f783179323916bd8e6

(5002)

on October 05, 2011
at 06:06 PM

Totally totally - sry if I sounded combative - just adding to the pile of thoughts and info :)

1
77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on October 05, 2011
at 10:02 AM

Oh, there are bunch of them.

http://goo.gl/Rx3XY

0
D10ca8d11301c2f4993ac2279ce4b930

(5242)

on November 22, 2011
at 11:17 PM

Remember to look at what type of coffee they are using. Coffee isn't coffee isn't coffee. There's a difference in coffee quality that likely will correlate to a difference in health outcomes. Perhaps, good quality artisan, fresh roasted coffee will be better for you or perhaps, it will be worse. Just another variable to consider.

0
Da3d4a6835c0f5256b2ef829b3ba3393

on November 22, 2011
at 10:18 PM

From ABC News:

"The research, published in the journal Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, examined data from the Nurses' Health Study, one of the largest and longest-running investigations of factors that influence women's health. Out of the more than 67,000 women enrolled in the study, researchers found that women who drank more than four cups of coffee per day were linked to a 25 percent reduced risk of endometrial cancer. Women who drank two to three cups per day reduced that risk by 7 percent."

http://abcnews.go.com/Health/coffee-cut-endometrial-cancer-risk/story?id=15002253

Observational, to be sure, but dammit I like coffee and I like to find anything that justifies drinking tons of it.

0
F1b39d4f620876330312f4925bd51900

(4090)

on October 05, 2011
at 05:19 PM

You could check out this Ray Peat article in caffeine/coffee, Ray sites a ton of sources at the end of his document: http://raypeat.com/articles/articles/caffeine.shtml

He likes the fact that it lowers absorption of Iron. (See his article on the dangers of Iron).

-1
1153fbd07055edb0b729e2249f455477

(-48)

on November 28, 2012
at 05:48 PM

Ive heard that Organo gold gives u alot of benefits and that its good for you. Check it out http://mycapturepage.com/cp23.php?id=470

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