3

votes

Coffee, friend or foe?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created August 18, 2013 at 8:19 PM

Foe: http://thechart.blogs.cnn.com/2013/08/15/study-heavy-coffee-drinking-in-people-under-55-linked-to-early-death/

Friend: http://m.theweek.com/article.php?id=244468

Is coffee a tool to enhance metabolic fitness and mental performance or is it going to double your risk of death and lead to addiction? Maybe its somewhere in between? Clinical, epidemiological and n=1s are all welcome.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on August 19, 2013
at 03:51 PM

One of the oddities of the conclusions is that the group that is most affected CVD is not a major cause of mortality. Younger people die from accidents much more than from strokes, and their overall mortality is much leer than for old people. So I'm not being facetious about knife fights and meth. Young men who use high levels of stimulants are probably increasing risk for violent and accidental events of all kinds.

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19463)

on August 19, 2013
at 10:33 AM

Yeah, whenever there's money involved there will be a lot of media frenzy.

Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10989)

on August 19, 2013
at 04:02 AM

One of the write ups said all cause mortality in young men doubles at >4/day. Not sure exactly how they came to that conclusion.

Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10989)

on August 19, 2013
at 04:00 AM

Lol thhq, thanks for linking the hard study. Looks like the lowest mortality in men in model 2 was for people who drank 3-4 cups per day. Not sure where the media got their numbers exactly.

Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10989)

on August 19, 2013
at 03:58 AM

Thanks for sharing varelse :)

Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10989)

on August 19, 2013
at 03:24 AM

Thanks raydawg.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on August 18, 2013
at 08:58 PM

Doubled? What doubled? I can't find anything doubled in reading the paper. Average hazard ratios increase by 10% or so for the at-risk group. The error bands are wide enough to cover every level of coffee drinking. And the increase in all-cause mortality explains nothing and insinuates everything. Maybe young coffee hounds have a propensity for accidental drowning and knife fights. Maybe all that nicotine and caffeine has a bad synergy, and they don't even mention whether they were tweakers.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on August 18, 2013
at 08:46 PM

raydawg the Mayo Clinic was preaching that long before the new paper came out. It smells of confirmation bias. The supposed health effect is almost entirely for men under 55, and over 30% of them were smokers. They controlled for CVD risk by factoring the other risk factors out - supposedly. The media frenzy that followed is predictable: make people fearful and they will buy your paper.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on August 18, 2013
at 08:37 PM

Well if the coffee is strong it makes sense.

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5 Answers

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6
96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19463)

on August 18, 2013
at 08:28 PM

As with everything else, the dose makes the poison. Coffee, like other things we consume, and very much like many minerals, and many vitamins, (though it's far from either) has a U shaped curved. The sweet spot is right in the middle, and it tends to be around 4 cups/day for most people. Lower than that, and it has a smaller effect, more than that and it starts to have a negative effect.

Some are sensitive to it, some build resistance to it, so the shape changes depending on who you are and how addicted you are.

One thing to know, it's ergogenic (that means it enhances your performance) if you consume it before a weight lifting workout, but becomes catabolic to muscle growth if consumed after a weight lifting workout. Why? For both sides, the answer is cortisol. Caffeine triggers it. Cortisol helps you get more energy and work out, but it also triggers gluconeogenesis, and this breaks down protein to create glucose. If you just worked out, you damaged muscle fibers, so if you go catabolic instead of anabolic, it's detrimental to building muscle.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on August 18, 2013
at 08:46 PM

raydawg the Mayo Clinic was preaching that long before the new paper came out. It smells of confirmation bias. The supposed health effect is almost entirely for men under 55, and over 30% of them were smokers. They controlled for CVD risk by factoring the other risk factors out - supposedly. The media frenzy that followed is predictable: make people fearful and they will buy your paper.

Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10989)

on August 19, 2013
at 03:24 AM

Thanks raydawg.

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19463)

on August 19, 2013
at 10:33 AM

Yeah, whenever there's money involved there will be a lot of media frenzy.

5
F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on August 19, 2013
at 07:42 AM

I was just thinking about it the other day, but it did not puzzle me enough to ask this question.

Good for:

Altzheimer's prevention

dementia prevention

diabetes prevention

Bad for:

mold allergy

candida

gut dysbiosis

hyperglycemia

diabetes

I don't know.

3
Medium avatar

(10611)

on August 18, 2013
at 08:36 PM

Read the full study.

http://www.mayoclinicproceedings.org/webfiles/images/journals/jmcp/jmcp_ft88_9_1.pdf

You decide whether the sky is falling or not. The high coffee drinking young people in this study smoked like chimneys. The media didn't reach the obvious conclusion, that 4 cups a day of coffee a day causes smoking....

Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10989)

on August 19, 2013
at 04:00 AM

Lol thhq, thanks for linking the hard study. Looks like the lowest mortality in men in model 2 was for people who drank 3-4 cups per day. Not sure where the media got their numbers exactly.

3
61f9349ad28e3c42d1cec58ba4825a7d

(10490)

on August 18, 2013
at 08:32 PM

Here's another pro for the elderly - it can boost muscle strength. Doesn't appear to work for the young.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/06/120629120445.htm

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22648466

Medium avatar

(10611)

on August 18, 2013
at 08:37 PM

Well if the coffee is strong it makes sense.

Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10989)

on August 19, 2013
at 03:58 AM

Thanks for sharing varelse :)

1
A7c1857ce53fb11a9351d05718c7070d

(283)

on August 19, 2013
at 09:42 PM

Coffee is also apparently good for reducing systemic inflammation, protecting us from fatty liver disease, and beneficial for our gut bacteria.

http://www.thebarefootgolfer.com/2013/02/14/coffee-is-it-part-of-a-healthy-lifestyle-or-not/

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