19

votes

Caffeine- Good or Bad?

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created September 16, 2010 at 2:14 PM

Okay. Caffeine- Good or Bad? I have read studies advocating both. I've even seen gyms that promote caffeine. I have heard that caffeine causes insulin spikes, but I have also heard that it is good for your health in certain amounts. I'm looking for clarity on caffeine!

9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on January 05, 2012
at 07:40 PM

Not all ulcers are caused by bacteria.

5e36f73c3f95eb4ea13a009f4936449f

(8280)

on January 05, 2012
at 06:44 PM

Must have been before they learned ulcers were caused by bacteria. I think I'd be pissed at the doctor if I were your dad. :)

Cd2ff8c68dd1f1d539ad7f0ee94b0421

(1061)

on February 21, 2011
at 06:26 PM

I tried the coconut milk latte ... couldn't steam it. So I went to straight espresso. Another alternative is a breve ... a latte made with half-n-half ... much less carbs, more fat than milk.

034c678bff434ab3781e3f1771018af9

(279)

on February 03, 2011
at 03:50 AM

Chronic fatigue isn't a well-established diagnosis. It's super controversial. So the claim that caffeine consumption causes it should be taken with a grain of salt.

A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4

(20436)

on December 03, 2010
at 05:58 PM

Update: Cut my caffeine by half and my blood sugar control has improved somewhat.

A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4

(20436)

on December 03, 2010
at 05:56 PM

Coffee and tea are fine? Really? Perhaps perusal of some of the answers below would change that stance. I think there are positive and negative aspects to coffee/tea/caffeine. Agree on the sugar, but full fat cream should not be a problem for most people.

A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4

(20436)

on November 02, 2010
at 01:11 PM

Its only by 15%. Oops, that's how much my metformin increases it. Am I taking meds that only cancel out the caffeine? Time to seriously reconsider going decaf or water only. (Whines and cries)

1ec4e7ca085b7f8d5821529653e1e35a

(5506)

on September 30, 2010
at 12:38 PM

oh man coconut milk latte... never thought about that! sounds awesome.

Da4688a27b47c5ffc844e9a009369240

(55)

on September 26, 2010
at 07:04 PM

Yerba mate, especially prepared the South American way with gourd and bombilla, has at least as much caffeine as coffee! However, it seems a much 'cleaner' buzz. Doesn't make one as jittery. I've often wondered if it is not caffeine but rather the other alkaloids in coffee that make one jittery.

C53665c3f012fa1ede91033b08a8a6e7

(2269)

on September 26, 2010
at 06:25 PM

Yes, that was it. I avoided the buffet completely ;) for that kind of money I want as much meat as I can keep down.

A8d95f3744a7a0885894ee0731c9744c

(3761)

on September 25, 2010
at 06:00 PM

Do you steam the coconut milk? I have heard that it's difficult to pull and froth the milk b/c there is so little protein. I've managed to do it with almond milk, but it wasn't easy, and I was using a La Marzoco (I used to manage a coffee shop, I was a barista for years :-) ).

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19245)

on September 25, 2010
at 12:23 PM

One day I will have my own esspreso machine...

A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4

(20436)

on September 20, 2010
at 05:18 PM

Well, sign me up for the bobsled!

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19245)

on September 20, 2010
at 12:28 PM

Those are some serious withdrawl symptoms.

8e3782b68e033763485472f414f507a5

(2433)

on September 20, 2010
at 11:55 AM

Yep -- and it's the same story with alcohol. Everyone who drinks wants it to be healthy.

88905cfc5bb098ad3830671a1af373a8

(803)

on September 20, 2010
at 10:25 AM

Wolf sounds like a bit of an addict.

7558eaba1eb5ef595aab56dde30e8b6d

(55)

on September 20, 2010
at 02:01 AM

Ooh, was it Ipanema Grill downtown? That place is pricey but oh so delicious, especially if you can restrain yourself from filling up on the buffet and primarily eat meat off the skewers.

F82f7d4dafb6d0ffc4c2ee2a85420786

(484)

on September 20, 2010
at 01:35 AM

Good decaf uses water, not chemicals, to decaffeinate it - if you're not sure check with the roaster or retailer

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19245)

on September 19, 2010
at 02:45 PM

Glad I am not an insect then :)

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19245)

on September 19, 2010
at 02:44 PM

Caffeine used to be banned by the IOC but it was taken off the list a few years ago. http://www.abc.net.au/news/stories/2008/08/02/2322263.htm?site=olympics/2008

1a8020e101199de55c1b3b726f342321

(1973)

on September 18, 2010
at 09:31 PM

Coffee is actually a bitter herb, and the health benefits of drinking it are well documented. Same goes for tea, which has more caffeine by weight than coffee.

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19245)

on September 18, 2010
at 05:03 PM

It also seems to lower your risk of diabetes.

8e75344356f4a455185ee52da0b90bf2

on September 17, 2010
at 05:14 PM

I also gave up caffeine and took my whole family off of it. caffeine is produced by plants as an insecticide and, frankly, I don't think that my liver needs the added load of metabolising this toxin. I don't *need* it - there is decaf coffee and tea - and don't need the addiction so why subject my body to it? :)

Db56a3a7ef6f208222cb501f29741b64

(30)

on September 17, 2010
at 04:50 PM

caffeine has not been banned by the IOC http://www.wada-ama.org/rtecontent/document/2009_Prohibited_List_ENG_Final_20_Sept_08.pdf

4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1

(22913)

on September 17, 2010
at 12:43 PM

Hazelnut flavoring is usually heavy sugar. Decaf is scary because of chems used to filter it

154bf5c84f7bd9f52b361b45d05dbc3a

(1215)

on September 17, 2010
at 10:54 AM

"Need" is the right word. Like other kinds of addicts they get cranky and irritable if they don't get their fix.

1a8020e101199de55c1b3b726f342321

(1973)

on September 16, 2010
at 04:16 PM

Coffee and tea are fine, they are herbs and regularly consumed by "healthy" cultures. It's the added sugar & processed milk products that are dangerous.

A8d95f3744a7a0885894ee0731c9744c

(3761)

on September 16, 2010
at 03:51 PM

I love espresso; I'm trying to give up vices, though...for a while at least. Thanks for the input, JP!

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24 Answers

11
8e3782b68e033763485472f414f507a5

(2433)

on September 16, 2010
at 04:05 PM

I avoid it. I look around at everyone I work with, and see how they "need" their coffee in the morning to function, and I don't want to be like that. The vast majority of the adult population is dependent on caffeine. It's crazy.

Caffeine is like any other drug -- over time you need more of it to get the same effect. That's how 1 cup of coffee per day turns into several over the long term. There was a study earlier this year (which I can't find right now) which showed that caffeine actually causes fatigue over time. Some good into here also: http://www.naturalnews.com/012352.html

154bf5c84f7bd9f52b361b45d05dbc3a

(1215)

on September 17, 2010
at 10:54 AM

"Need" is the right word. Like other kinds of addicts they get cranky and irritable if they don't get their fix.

1a8020e101199de55c1b3b726f342321

(1973)

on September 18, 2010
at 09:31 PM

Coffee is actually a bitter herb, and the health benefits of drinking it are well documented. Same goes for tea, which has more caffeine by weight than coffee.

8e75344356f4a455185ee52da0b90bf2

on September 17, 2010
at 05:14 PM

I also gave up caffeine and took my whole family off of it. caffeine is produced by plants as an insecticide and, frankly, I don't think that my liver needs the added load of metabolising this toxin. I don't *need* it - there is decaf coffee and tea - and don't need the addiction so why subject my body to it? :)

034c678bff434ab3781e3f1771018af9

(279)

on February 03, 2011
at 03:50 AM

Chronic fatigue isn't a well-established diagnosis. It's super controversial. So the claim that caffeine consumption causes it should be taken with a grain of salt.

7
1c67bc28f4e44bbb8770b86df0463df3

on January 05, 2012
at 06:24 PM

Here is a major problem with coffee. Studies take people who do not consume caffeine and then add it to their diet. Sure, its EASY to show that caffeine helps lose weight and a whole host of other 'pluses' going from no caffeine to caffeine. Bet we could conduct the same exact studies with almost any stimulant including nicotine, cocaine, and amphetamine (all shown to lower weight) and have other 'positive results'.

On the other side of the coin, I have yet to read a single person write 'I quit coffee and feel horrible after the temporary withdrawal side effects passed'. Instead, there are literally millions of people (google) who feel 'so much', '100%', etc better after quitting coffee.

How 'good for you' can anything be, that prompts withdrawal symptoms from you once you stop taking it? Whether it is coffee, opiates, benzos, amphetamines, cocaine, or nicotine?

Furthermore, every single one of those addictive drugs above has been proven 'safe' by studies and the governments of the world.

Coffee - obviously legal and supposedly 'safe'- starbucks,maxwell house, dunkin

Opiates - obviously legal and supposedly 'safe' - morphine, oxycodone, etc , Pain meds

Amphetamines - obviously legal and supposedly 'safe' - ritalin, provigil(sort of), ADD meds

Benzos - " " - valium, xanax

Cocaine - " " - cocaine is still used in medical practice

Nicotine - " " - by itself (without the smoke) another great stimulant like coffee.

The REAL TESTS should be how people feel AFTER stopping and after withdrawal has passed whether it is coffee or any other drug and Im pretty sure you will conclude that there is ample evidence to support that people are better off not consuming any addictive substances.

P.S. addiction = the hijacking of the mind and various body systems/subsystems + the webster definition

7
154bf5c84f7bd9f52b361b45d05dbc3a

(1215)

on September 17, 2010
at 10:50 AM

Caffeine is a natural occurring pesticide:

"Caffeine is found in varying quantities in the beans, leaves, and fruit of some plants, where it acts as a natural pesticide that paralyzes and kills certain insects feeding on the plants".

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caffeine

It is probably the worlds most widely used drug. But just because everyone else is doing it doesn't mean you should.

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19245)

on September 19, 2010
at 02:45 PM

Glad I am not an insect then :)

6
9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on September 19, 2010
at 04:50 PM

Gave up coffee recently. My mood and energy levels are so much more stable, even though I did have to whether about a week of withdrawl. I might have a genetic predisposition to chemical dependency though. I remember as a child my father lying in bed in the dark for days with a serious pounding headache when his doctor told him to give up coffee because of ulcers.

I'm pretty happy with yerba mate in the morning now. I don't do much and if I don't drink any it's not like my day is ruined like it was with coffee.

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19245)

on September 20, 2010
at 12:28 PM

Those are some serious withdrawl symptoms.

Da4688a27b47c5ffc844e9a009369240

(55)

on September 26, 2010
at 07:04 PM

Yerba mate, especially prepared the South American way with gourd and bombilla, has at least as much caffeine as coffee! However, it seems a much 'cleaner' buzz. Doesn't make one as jittery. I've often wondered if it is not caffeine but rather the other alkaloids in coffee that make one jittery.

5e36f73c3f95eb4ea13a009f4936449f

(8280)

on January 05, 2012
at 06:44 PM

Must have been before they learned ulcers were caused by bacteria. I think I'd be pissed at the doctor if I were your dad. :)

9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on January 05, 2012
at 07:40 PM

Not all ulcers are caused by bacteria.

6
A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4

(20436)

on September 16, 2010
at 06:53 PM

Caffeine improves althletic performance. That's why its banned by the IOC. Its a stimulant which puts a load on adrenals and the liver. Best to avoid, but may be fine in small amounts (much like ethanol).

Disclosure: This advice brought to you by a serious caffeine addict.

A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4

(20436)

on September 20, 2010
at 05:18 PM

Well, sign me up for the bobsled!

Db56a3a7ef6f208222cb501f29741b64

(30)

on September 17, 2010
at 04:50 PM

caffeine has not been banned by the IOC http://www.wada-ama.org/rtecontent/document/2009_Prohibited_List_ENG_Final_20_Sept_08.pdf

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19245)

on September 19, 2010
at 02:44 PM

Caffeine used to be banned by the IOC but it was taken off the list a few years ago. http://www.abc.net.au/news/stories/2008/08/02/2322263.htm?site=olympics/2008

3
F5698e16f1793c0bb00daea6a2e222a4

(678)

on September 16, 2010
at 02:48 PM

I don't know if it spikes insulin, but it does lower your sensitivity.

http://care.diabetesjournals.org/content/25/2/364.full?ijkey=869475f20c4de9960f8370d4af761b90a3a66b03

I used to drink a lot of coffee, 3-5 cups a day. I decided to cut back on caffeine, but not eliminate it completely. I have 1-2 cups of coffee in the morning everyday. On the rare day that I don't get enough sleep but still want to get in a good workout I'll have a half cup 15 mins before exercising. I don't drink any type of soda or take caffeine pills, so coffee is my only source.

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19245)

on September 18, 2010
at 05:03 PM

It also seems to lower your risk of diabetes.

A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4

(20436)

on November 02, 2010
at 01:11 PM

Its only by 15%. Oops, that's how much my metformin increases it. Am I taking meds that only cancel out the caffeine? Time to seriously reconsider going decaf or water only. (Whines and cries)

A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4

(20436)

on December 03, 2010
at 05:58 PM

Update: Cut my caffeine by half and my blood sugar control has improved somewhat.

2
A2cec60e836de2d9dbe43d456cac2dab

(146)

on January 05, 2012
at 05:28 PM

I did a whole bunch of research on caffeine and coffee yesterday (caffeine in green tea and its effects on the body are supposedly different than coffee-and green tea has much less caffeine than coffee) and hope I am not violating etiquette by posting the studies I found here. After reading these things below, I decided to try swapping coffee with green tea for a while and see what happens bc I have a bad insulin problem. I LOVE coffee. This is a sampling of what I found-- too bad some studies have such small subject #s:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17998023 Metabolic and hormonal effects of caffeine: randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover trial. MacKenzie T, Comi R, Sluss P, Keisari R, Manwar S, Kim J, Larson R, Baron JA. Source Department of Medicine, Dartmouth Medical School, Hanover, NH 03755, USA. todd.mackenzie@dartmouth.edu Abstract In short-term studies, caffeine has been shown to increase insulin levels, reduce insulin sensitivity, and increase cortisol levels. However, epidemiological studies have indicated that long-term consumption of beverages containing caffeine such as coffee and green tea is associated with a reduced risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus. There is a paucity of randomized studies addressing the metabolic and hormonal effects of consuming caffeine over periods of more than 1 day. We evaluated the effect of oral intake of 200 mg of caffeine taken twice a day for 7 days on glucose metabolism, as well as on serum cortisol, dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), and androstenedione, and on nighttime salivary melatonin. A double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled crossover study with periods of 7 days and washouts of 5 days comparing caffeine with placebo capsules was conducted. Participants were 16 healthy adults aged 18 to 22 years with a history of caffeine consumption. Blood samples from each subject were assayed for glucose, insulin, serum cortisol, DHEA, and androstenedione on the eighth day of each period after an overnight fast. Nighttime salivary melatonin was also measured. Insulin levels were significantly higher (by 1.80 microU/mL; 95% confidence interval, 0.33-3.28) after caffeine intake than after placebo. The homeostasis model assessment index of insulin sensitivity was reduced by 35% (95% confidence interval, 7%-62%) by caffeine. There were no differences in glucose, DHEA, androstenedione, and melatonin between treatment periods. This study provides evidence that daily caffeine intake reduces insulin sensitivity; the effect persists for at least a week and is evident up to 12 hours after administration.

This is also interesting ??? about coffee???s effect on people with a gluten sensitivity: http://drclark.typepad.com/dr_david_clark/pcos/

Here's another one: Caffeine May Hamper Blood Sugar Control Caffeine at Mealtime May Cause Problems for People With Type 2 Diabetes

WebMD Health News July 26, 2004 -- Caffeine may cause problems with blood sugar control after meals for people with type 2 diabetes, according to a new study. Although more research is needed to confirm these results, researchers say their findings show that people with diabetes who have problems with glucose and insulin control should consider cutting back on caffeine in their diets. The study showed that after a large dose of caffeine, blood glucose and insulin levels surge in response after meals in people with type 2 diabetes. These patients can have high insulin levels because they inefficiently use the hormone to lower blood glucose. "In a healthy person, glucose is metabolized within an hour or so after eating. Diabetics, however, do not metabolize glucose as efficiently," says researcher James D. Lane, PhD, associate research professor in the department of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Duke University, in a news release. "It appears that diabetics who consume caffeine are likely having a harder time regulating their insulin and glucose levels than those who don't take caffeine." "The goal of clinical treatment for diabetes is to keep the person's blood glucose down," says Lane. Caffeine May Interfere With Glucose Control In the study, published in the August issue of Diabetes Care, researchers looked at the effects of caffeine on glucose and insulin levels in 14 people with type 2 diabetes who regularly drank coffee. None of the participants required insulin therapy as part of their diabetes treatment. The participants were observed on two different mornings after an overnight fast and abstinence from caffeine. On the observation days, the participants took their prescribed diabetes medications and provided a blood sample 30 minutes later. While still fasting they were then given two 125-milligram capsules of caffeine or a placebo. A cup of coffee contains from 80 milligrams to 175 milligrams of caffeine. A second set of blood tests were then analyzed an hour after the taking the pills. Participants were then fed a liquid meal containing 75 grams of carbohydrates and another 125-milligram caffeine capsule or placebo. Additional blood samples were taken an hour and two hours following the meal. The study showed that caffeine had little effect on glucose and insulin levels during the fasting period, but it caused significant surges after eating a meal. People who received the 375-milligram dose of caffeine experienced a 21% larger increase in glucose levels and a 48% larger increase in insulin levels compared with those who took the placebo during the two hours following their meals. "It seems that caffeine, by further impairing the metabolism of meals, is something diabetics ought to consider avoiding. Some people already watch their diet and exercise regularly," says Lane. "Avoiding caffeine might be another way to better manage their disease. In fact, it's possible that staying away from caffeine could provide bigger benefits altogether." The researchers say that blood sugars after meals correspond more closely to overall blood glucose control and may more accurately predict heart disease risk.

** There are also articles that say coffee raises testosterone, some others say lowers testosterone (you canm look up artciles on coffee and balding). Conflicting evidence that it reduces risk for Type II diabetes but then above show it has bad effect on insulin, glucose, and cortisol. Other studies say it reduces risk of alzheimers' and depression in children. So there's lots of conflicting evidence, and also seems in some respects good for you, some bad. And I've heard it wears down your adrenals and causes stress, anxiety in some. I think I remember reading in this book called The Orgasm Diet that they addressed coffee, but can't remember what they said. Because personally I have such a bad insulin problem, I am not doing it. But I bet most people would be okay with moderate amounts. I also didnt like being dependent on it to function. But boy do i miss it!!!

Also note there are other studies on decaf.

1
77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on December 03, 2010
at 05:41 PM

C affine has both good and bad. Caffeine acts as a stimulant on the heart and central nervous system. Caffeine is useful for weight loss. Caffeine also helps in suppressing the appetite.

hyperhydrosis

1
F9e59a62c46422660c692033146c12fc

(95)

on September 25, 2010
at 12:04 PM

I have an expresso machine so grind my own beans and make a latte with coconut milk!

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19245)

on September 25, 2010
at 12:23 PM

One day I will have my own esspreso machine...

A8d95f3744a7a0885894ee0731c9744c

(3761)

on September 25, 2010
at 06:00 PM

Do you steam the coconut milk? I have heard that it's difficult to pull and froth the milk b/c there is so little protein. I've managed to do it with almond milk, but it wasn't easy, and I was using a La Marzoco (I used to manage a coffee shop, I was a barista for years :-) ).

1ec4e7ca085b7f8d5821529653e1e35a

(5506)

on September 30, 2010
at 12:38 PM

oh man coconut milk latte... never thought about that! sounds awesome.

Cd2ff8c68dd1f1d539ad7f0ee94b0421

(1061)

on February 21, 2011
at 06:26 PM

I tried the coconut milk latte ... couldn't steam it. So I went to straight espresso. Another alternative is a breve ... a latte made with half-n-half ... much less carbs, more fat than milk.

1
62ed65f3596aa2f62fa1d58a0c09f8c3

(20807)

on September 20, 2010
at 03:37 AM

I suspect most caffeine addicts really want it to be good for them. They really like it and they really want to drink it and still feel they are eating healthy. I don't think caffeine is super healthy. However, it's probably one of those things that in most people can be tolerated with minimal bad side effects. And since it is a stimulant, it will have effects on alertness, memory, and energy levels. A similar example would be that a lot of healthy tribes eat betal nut and they are still very healthy. I would not go so far as to say betal nut is good for you though. They are just healthy despite the betal nut.

8e3782b68e033763485472f414f507a5

(2433)

on September 20, 2010
at 11:55 AM

Yep -- and it's the same story with alcohol. Everyone who drinks wants it to be healthy.

1
F82f7d4dafb6d0ffc4c2ee2a85420786

(484)

on September 20, 2010
at 01:38 AM

I have wondered myself whether it's good or bad. Robb Wolf 7 Andy Deas drink coffee, which tells me it can't be too bad? Anyway, I have given it up twice, then both times decided I don't feel much better and that life isn't really worth living without the taste, smell and kick of coffee. And when you have cut out most other vices, you gotta keep something!

88905cfc5bb098ad3830671a1af373a8

(803)

on September 20, 2010
at 10:25 AM

Wolf sounds like a bit of an addict.

1
6fa48935d439390e223b9a053a62c981

(1676)

on September 16, 2010
at 05:20 PM

I will not give up my morning black coffee. I love the smell and the taste, and I love relaxing with a hot cup for a few minutes before all the morning craziness starts. I have switched to "half-caf," brewed with a mix of half decaf and half regular. Is the hazelnut flavoring/aroma ok? Does anyone know what it's made of?

F82f7d4dafb6d0ffc4c2ee2a85420786

(484)

on September 20, 2010
at 01:35 AM

Good decaf uses water, not chemicals, to decaffeinate it - if you're not sure check with the roaster or retailer

4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1

(22913)

on September 17, 2010
at 12:43 PM

Hazelnut flavoring is usually heavy sugar. Decaf is scary because of chems used to filter it

1
D5db204527668aa712504995c0f8f96f

(551)

on September 16, 2010
at 03:37 PM

I'm not giving up espresso. The rest of my diet and lifestyle is in check so I don't see how a small vice like this could ruin everything.

Caffeine might not be totally paleo, but if you get some in moderate amounts and that your lifestyle (eating, stress, sleep, etc.) is in check, I say go for it.

It surely did not stop my progress.

A8d95f3744a7a0885894ee0731c9744c

(3761)

on September 16, 2010
at 03:51 PM

I love espresso; I'm trying to give up vices, though...for a while at least. Thanks for the input, JP!

1
667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on September 16, 2010
at 03:24 PM

Just thinking evolutionarily I would say that we did not evolve to be who we are today with caffeine-containing things as a part of our diet.

That being said, I view it as a tool that we now posses and that we can use. I have my 1.5 cups in the morning and im done for the day, but its useful for what it does: fuel me to get out that door, then the rest of the day takes its course.

Insulin-relation i dont know. Hope it doesnt spike insulin i suppose, but hoping that most people dont take too much throughout the day even if it spiked the insulin a bit, i cant see it being that big a deal.

I have heard some people (including Wolf in his podcasts) mention having some caffeine in the form of some kind of coffee pre-workout for a little fuel bump. I suppose that would help, but i havent found the need for it. (Then again, if i had little kids at home, a crappier job, and sat in traffic i'd prolly need that bump, too:)

0
Bad3a78e228c67a7513c28f17c36b3cf

(1387)

on September 07, 2013
at 12:44 AM

Here's a summary of possible health benefits associated with coffee. http://www.lef.org/magazine/mag2012/jan2012_Discovering-Coffees-Unique-Health-Benefits_01.htm

0
Cf4576cbcc44fc7f2294135609bce9e5

on February 01, 2012
at 12:21 AM

it is not required and ity screws up your sleep. i think it was the fisrt drug used to help slaves put in longer days.

0
2d1125a5eac227aacba801bcab3bb9b8

(331)

on January 31, 2012
at 06:01 PM

I always think it's interesting how people seem to obsess over quitting coffee, but there's never the same massive campaign to "get off" tea. I know there's less caffeine per brewed cup of tea, but it's still there. And, black and green tea's health benefits are practically shouted from the mountaintops.

I like both coffee and tea. However, I usually prefer coffee and typically consume around two cups per day. (The tannins in tea tend to give me a stomach ache if I drink it on an empty stomach.)

I've read a lot of conflicting evidence, but nothing that makes me say, "I MUST quit this right NOW." As a result, I probably won't stop drinking either beverage anytime soon.

0
289bcc1b03264c0cf9ddd686ac18832c

(-2)

on January 31, 2012
at 02:28 PM

Caffeine can be both, obviously too much is bad and a lot on a regular basis isn't good, but it's not poison so if it's all you have to worry about I'd say your doing alright

Does drinking coffee make you lose hair

0
C53665c3f012fa1ede91033b08a8a6e7

(2269)

on September 19, 2010
at 02:59 PM

I've become seriously hooked on giant 20oz "brevé latte" which are made with half and half when I'm on the road. A rich creamy treat but I gained 8lbs last week on a business trip consuming 2-3 of these a day in lieu of eating lunch. Hm, may need to re-think that as a meal substitute. I do on-site training and some of my customers only give their workers 30 minutes for lunch which doesn't really encourage good eating habits if you've got to bolt it down between the lunch bells (just like in school).

I seem to gain 4-8lbs in a week when traveling no matter what I eat. Found a Brazilian "churrascaria" in Seatttle last week and ate approximately one-half of a tasty creature made of cow, lamb, buffalo and pig. We got there early and most of the skewers of meat they brought around still had a crispy layer of deeee-lish fat on them. Om nom nom.

7558eaba1eb5ef595aab56dde30e8b6d

(55)

on September 20, 2010
at 02:01 AM

Ooh, was it Ipanema Grill downtown? That place is pricey but oh so delicious, especially if you can restrain yourself from filling up on the buffet and primarily eat meat off the skewers.

C53665c3f012fa1ede91033b08a8a6e7

(2269)

on September 26, 2010
at 06:25 PM

Yes, that was it. I avoided the buffet completely ;) for that kind of money I want as much meat as I can keep down.

0
8287c6ddae0d78eae0a09fdd5999617c

(2581)

on September 19, 2010
at 08:31 AM

Well, it's bad because if you don't consume caffeine for some time, you'll end up with a severely painful headache as the main symptom of withdrawal. That's my experience from drinking lots of caffeinated soda. Maybe it's less bad with naturally occurring caffeine in coffee and tea? I think soda companies just mix in the caffeine powder in with every batch. Their way of keeping people addicted, or competing with coffee industry, I guess.

0
4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1

on September 17, 2010
at 12:45 PM

I drink coffee and green tea, but small quantity(and with flouride in tea likely no more tea :(.. )

I believe like many neolethal ingredients, the poison is in the dose.

0
03f5a69fde4012b827ebdb6d93b71e7a

on September 16, 2010
at 11:24 PM

I tend to agree with kilton, but feel that like other tools and drugs, caffeine can be used appropriately and intelligently for positive effects.

I absolutely want to avoid being hooked it on a daily basis, especially in the mornings, but I still have some form of caffeine several times a week. It's useful when I need to plow through a pile of boring work or am pooped before a 2.5 hour rehearsal.

0
B2e8fcb532f13e0393735a973c63d46b

on September 16, 2010
at 05:58 PM

Its my vice, and i love it!! with whole raw whipping cream!

-1
77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on November 27, 2012
at 08:19 PM

Organo gold coffee is deffa good for you http://mycapturepage.com/cp23.php?id=470

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