13

votes

Avoid coffee if gluten intolerant?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created May 01, 2012 at 1:38 PM

A bunch of sources say to avoid coffee if you are gluten intolerant, and apparently it was also mentioned at PaleoFX12:

Is this true? If yes, why is coffee so accepted among paleo community? Because of caffeine addiction?

Bring on the downvotes!

00cd3b6f51530a6832fcda1712edbec3

(2411)

on November 01, 2013
at 07:18 PM

Asprey's coffee is no different than you can get at a high-quality local roaster's. There's a comment on his site from a raw bean distributor and roaster near me that said that the measures that Asprey's growers and distributors take are common among many boutique outfits.

5bac45c78a2be60bc17fc2084a0f5d43

(259)

on November 15, 2012
at 07:19 AM

a lot of people don't have any problems with wheat either, until they get arthritis or Alzheimer's (or both)

5bac45c78a2be60bc17fc2084a0f5d43

(259)

on November 15, 2012
at 07:17 AM

Hehe, +1 for call to downvote - great sample of reverse psychology to drive off all the addicts around :)

Bfa1c9eacfc94a1b62f3a39b574480c6

(3700)

on August 13, 2012
at 05:19 PM

No downvote here. Upvoted for a good question.

91882203467f64f68f25f58f1caeee68

(1017)

on June 19, 2012
at 11:50 PM

How accurate/reliable are those tests?

7841848bd0c27c64353c583fb7971242

(7275)

on May 01, 2012
at 10:29 PM

Lindt says their dark chocolates have no gluten ingredients, but yeah, since they share lines with the truffles and other chocolates, some of which do contain gluten, there is possibility for cross-contamination. They say they clean the lines really thoroughly between runs, but my bowels say it's not sufficient.

725220a3fc595fbb5d96e71bfd690695

(254)

on May 01, 2012
at 10:11 PM

I also understand that some of the chocolate from Lindt, like their Truffles contain barley malt which is a problem for celiacs.

7841848bd0c27c64353c583fb7971242

(7275)

on May 01, 2012
at 07:39 PM

Lindt and Chocolove are particularly interesting. Lindt says they do have a shared facility, but clean the lines thoroughly in between batches. Chocolove says they do not add any gluten, but can't guarantee their ingredients don't contain gluten. In particular, the vanilla comes on a powder which should be derived from corn, but could contain gluten. I've been meaning to test them both with my home ELISA test kit... So far the only chocolates I can safely eat are TJs chocolate chips, Endangered Species, and Taza. I'd love to hear others' experiences w/ chocolate.

725220a3fc595fbb5d96e71bfd690695

(254)

on May 01, 2012
at 07:37 PM

Oops.....here's the link: http://www.blogtalkradio.com/undergroundwellness/2012/01/13/prps--the-secret-weapon-in-treating-neurological-disorders.

725220a3fc595fbb5d96e71bfd690695

(254)

on May 01, 2012
at 07:37 PM

Dr. O'Bryan spoke about it in this interview. Apparently it is common for people do develop a secondary intolerance to other things including coffee. The only way to know is to test and he talks about a test to determine other allergens.

F0e558010a2ecb31fa37b7c491596b8e

(3850)

on May 01, 2012
at 07:32 PM

I'm in the same boat with caffiene. Even chocolate has too much. I live on herbal tea.

9e975c86f483555ed19e59c5628488ca

(823)

on May 01, 2012
at 06:47 PM

Gluten contamination in commercial chocolate is exceedingly common, even in high end chocolates. Sometimes the packaging gives the impression that the company is careful about allergens stating "may contain traces of nuts" or "processed in a facility that also handles nuts" However you almost NEVER see "may contain wheat, or wheat products" on any commercial chocolate even though it's true.

7841848bd0c27c64353c583fb7971242

(7275)

on May 01, 2012
at 04:51 PM

It's just like a gluten reaction, and I don't get the reaction from tamari or tempeh.

Ae8946707ddebf0f0bfbcfc63276d823

(9402)

on May 01, 2012
at 03:28 PM

haha. amazing link.

685e3c967e63b4eacccf02628fd9a3ac

(1026)

on May 01, 2012
at 02:48 PM

Have you checked out the use of soy lecithin in chocolate? Could be the culprit too...

Ebb10603524dd22621c1155dd7ddf106

(19150)

on May 01, 2012
at 02:19 PM

Thanks for all the links/sources. It's very interesting that it's not about caffeine at all, but rather the proteins in the coffee (decaf or regular).

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14 Answers

best answer

3
9e975c86f483555ed19e59c5628488ca

(823)

on May 01, 2012
at 06:55 PM

It's an both and / either or issue.

The pathology that causes

you to develop a gluten sensitivity can cause you to develop sensitivities to anything else too. Other food allergies are EXCEEDINGLY common in people with Celiac disease, as are other autoimmune disorders. Likewise people with ANY food allergy are more likely to OTHER food allergies. It's entierly possible that a large percentage of people who have issues with gluten also have issues with proteins in coffee because they escaped the bowel. It's also exceedingly common that the coffee is contaminated. Sources include

  • Reuse of grain transport bags at the plantation to move coffee beans
  • Bulk dry goods shipping in re-used containers
  • Using a coffee roaster that has been used (abused) to make toasted wheat products
  • Using a coffee roaster that has processed coffee that has been flavoured with wheat based flavouring
  • Using an industrial milling machine that has processed other dry goods contaminated with wheat
  • Using general dry goods processing equipment to handle and bag coffee that has been used with contaminants
  • Using a coffee grinder that has been used to grind contaminated items, ie flavoured coffee in the past
  • Using a coffee brewer that has been used to brew coffee which is contaminated (like flavoured coffee)
  • Using mugs which have been contaminated

5
F1b39d4f620876330312f4925bd51900

(4090)

on May 01, 2012
at 06:32 PM

I react really strongly to gluten, in any amount. But I don't react badly at all to coffee. I drink 2 shot american daily. Granted it might be doing some underlying damage, but I could care less. I love coffee.

3
6730ad71e725dfeeb9a6dfadd7867fe4

on June 30, 2012
at 01:32 AM

I had the test from Cyrex -- said I could not have wheat (which I knew) but that I could have rye and barley. Ate a slice of rye bread from an organic loaf made in a wheat-free facility and had a very strong reaction the next day (I have neurological reactions). From my own experience those tests are not 100% reliable and can't say I'd recommend them.

3
F0e558010a2ecb31fa37b7c491596b8e

(3850)

on May 01, 2012
at 06:40 PM

Funny, I've known for 10 years that I can't have coffee. I suffered constant hives and eczema all over my face until I gave it up. Immeidate improvement.

It took the last 10 years to figure out I had a problem with gluten, but to me there's definitely a connection.

3
Cf416725f639ffd1bb90764792ce7b8a

(2799)

on May 01, 2012
at 03:09 PM

People have been attacking coffee since 1674 and I've never had a problem with it, so it never makes it onto my list of things to avoid.

http://www.gopetition.com/famous-petitions-in-history/232/the-women-s-petition-against-coffee-1674.html

Ae8946707ddebf0f0bfbcfc63276d823

(9402)

on May 01, 2012
at 03:28 PM

haha. amazing link.

5bac45c78a2be60bc17fc2084a0f5d43

(259)

on November 15, 2012
at 07:19 AM

a lot of people don't have any problems with wheat either, until they get arthritis or Alzheimer's (or both)

3
7841848bd0c27c64353c583fb7971242

(7275)

on May 01, 2012
at 02:25 PM

I've heard that it could be cross-contamination from the bags used to carry the coffee. As in, the bags may have carried grains previously, and thus been contaminated with gluten/flour while carrying the coffee beans, contaminating the coffee beans. It could also potentially be some other part of the processing chain.

It's not clear to me, though, whether it's cross-contamination or cross-reactivity. I thought I had a cross-reactivity to chocolate, but then I found some brands of chocolate that are safe for me, leading me to believe that my reaction to most brands of chocolate was due to cross-contamination. I'm guessing the same might be true for coffee. On the other hand, there are a lot of compounds in coffee, so it could be cross-reactivity to one of them. I'd love to hear if anyone has had the lab testing you've linked to. I'd love to do it, myself, but $280 is steep!

As for the popularity in the paleo community: I think the trace amounts of gluten won't bother most people unless they're really sensitive celiacs. I have friends with celiac disease who don't need to be anywhere near as careful of what they eat as I do, and yet feel great and show up clean on blood tests and biopsy. Many celiacs are just fine eating below 200ppm or 20ppm gluten. So even if there is like 2ppm of gluten in coffee, I think most paleo people don't need to sweat it.

685e3c967e63b4eacccf02628fd9a3ac

(1026)

on May 01, 2012
at 02:48 PM

Have you checked out the use of soy lecithin in chocolate? Could be the culprit too...

7841848bd0c27c64353c583fb7971242

(7275)

on May 01, 2012
at 04:51 PM

It's just like a gluten reaction, and I don't get the reaction from tamari or tempeh.

725220a3fc595fbb5d96e71bfd690695

(254)

on May 01, 2012
at 10:11 PM

I also understand that some of the chocolate from Lindt, like their Truffles contain barley malt which is a problem for celiacs.

7841848bd0c27c64353c583fb7971242

(7275)

on May 01, 2012
at 07:39 PM

Lindt and Chocolove are particularly interesting. Lindt says they do have a shared facility, but clean the lines thoroughly in between batches. Chocolove says they do not add any gluten, but can't guarantee their ingredients don't contain gluten. In particular, the vanilla comes on a powder which should be derived from corn, but could contain gluten. I've been meaning to test them both with my home ELISA test kit... So far the only chocolates I can safely eat are TJs chocolate chips, Endangered Species, and Taza. I'd love to hear others' experiences w/ chocolate.

9e975c86f483555ed19e59c5628488ca

(823)

on May 01, 2012
at 06:47 PM

Gluten contamination in commercial chocolate is exceedingly common, even in high end chocolates. Sometimes the packaging gives the impression that the company is careful about allergens stating "may contain traces of nuts" or "processed in a facility that also handles nuts" However you almost NEVER see "may contain wheat, or wheat products" on any commercial chocolate even though it's true.

7841848bd0c27c64353c583fb7971242

(7275)

on May 01, 2012
at 10:29 PM

Lindt says their dark chocolates have no gluten ingredients, but yeah, since they share lines with the truffles and other chocolates, some of which do contain gluten, there is possibility for cross-contamination. They say they clean the lines really thoroughly between runs, but my bowels say it's not sufficient.

2
Bc476ba97f05dce9a05381528a8fa4b5

on May 09, 2012
at 01:29 AM

Coffee is definitely a common cross reactive food with gluten, as is casein in dairy, as are some other foods for some people. Other foods have proteins that are close in structure to gluten, so the body reacts the same to them sometimes. Chocolate can be cross reactive too- but it could possibly be the milk in milk chocolate. Test- don't guess. Get a test from Cyrex labs for cross-reactivity. The Array 4 panel is the one you want: http://www.cyrexlabs.com/CyrexTestsArrays/tabid/136/Default.aspx Another thing to consider is their Array 5 panel. From this you can find out what parts of your body are being attacked when you eat these foods, or anything else that triggers autoimmune responses. It's good motivation to know exactly what you are doing to yourself when you eat these foods, as well as being more clear about which foods will trigger the response.

91882203467f64f68f25f58f1caeee68

(1017)

on June 19, 2012
at 11:50 PM

How accurate/reliable are those tests?

2
4929a87e3f7438f18a0afbdde291ed5e

on May 01, 2012
at 06:56 PM

I have a definite reaction to coffee and I'm absolutely gluten intolerant. I think the two go hand-in-hand and cause problems and/or adrenal fatigue. I can't even do decaf coffee as it seemingly has "too much" caffeine for me. I have found that organic roasted chicory with almond milk to be a great alternative for coffee and has some of its own health benefits as well.

F0e558010a2ecb31fa37b7c491596b8e

(3850)

on May 01, 2012
at 07:32 PM

I'm in the same boat with caffiene. Even chocolate has too much. I live on herbal tea.

2
207affa8e73bba13c0b9e0cb12cecd35

on May 01, 2012
at 03:51 PM

I am hoping it's just the quality of coffee that is the issue but I didn't consider the packaging! I have been having a problem with coffee lately (so bummed!) but after reading Dave Asprey's blog about mycotoxins, I switched from the house espresso blend to organic single origin beans from a local roaster. This really made a difference for me! I actually ordered his Bulletproof coffee to try but I haven't received it yet. I'm so curious! Thanks for the head's up!

00cd3b6f51530a6832fcda1712edbec3

(2411)

on November 01, 2013
at 07:18 PM

Asprey's coffee is no different than you can get at a high-quality local roaster's. There's a comment on his site from a raw bean distributor and roaster near me that said that the measures that Asprey's growers and distributors take are common among many boutique outfits.

1
Ffc6eca3b241373c291d3d51e0cc0a96

on November 14, 2012
at 11:26 PM

Based on this article, it seems that some people with gluten intolerance can be sensitive to other foods including coffee. Apparently, the body mistakes the substance for gluten and attacks it exactly the same way it attacks gluten.

http://www.healthnowmedical.com/blog/2012/06/13/are-you-eating-cross-reactive-foods-that-mimic-gluten/

0
400b249032e4c829c4e802436833ea3b

on November 02, 2013
at 02:24 AM

Iv never understood how caffiene is considered paleo.

If caffiene causes horrible withdrawal symptoms when you quit, that in itself is telling enough for me.

It is common behaviour of an addict to defend their substance of choice.

0
Fd22a53cd269e460292397971a63fa90

on November 01, 2013
at 06:22 PM

I am wheat intolerant - not celiac disease, I can eat oat gluten but not wheat products - and I cross react ( also have an intolerance to ) coffee and chocolate !

0
478462d29916fcbf6b5041d55b84e0a0

on December 15, 2012
at 07:24 PM

I'm intolerant to wheat, rye, barley and oats as well as a long list of other products such as almonds, cashews, peanuts, soy, eggs and many more. The test shows no intolerance to coffee, but if I listen to my body, there's no question its poison for me. And the first indication is that even though I drink only 2 cups a day, I'm severely addicted to it (typical sign of an intolerance). I get far more nervous from drinking it than others, and it seems to cause repeated if not chronic UTIs. I therefore believe it is quite possible there is a connexion between wheat and coffee intolerances and I believe that our body is a better measurement of allergies than the tests currently in existence.

0
23b04eae23c3c64cb1253e5df01f610f

on September 22, 2012
at 03:01 AM

Kris.....I am trying to establish a link between neurological issues and wheat intolerance myself (petite mal seizures, 1 grand mal). I wonder the nature of yours and if you treat them solely by avoiding wheat or if you are on one of these god awful meds as well.

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