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How to Thicken Homemade Coconut Yogurt?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created November 12, 2011 at 12:25 AM

I have been successfully making my own yogurt from coconut cream/milk for a while - the taste is delicious but the consistency is always closer to that of drinking yoghurt. Does anyone have any tips to thicken it (and if so the quantity to use? I currently make my yogurt with 1 litre of coconut milk).

I doubt this was the best choice but I did try xanthum gum - which thickened it too much and made slight little lumps in it. I was thinking perhaps gelatin? I don't really flavour the yoghurt - at most I soak the milk with vanilla beans/add a drop of vanilla extract and also I use a dash of honey as the "sugar" for the cultures to metabolise.

94a4a87e3d2e1e9160b6ed77678b4bea

(1311)

on October 08, 2012
at 09:31 PM

Incorrect. Honey only acts like this on its own.

94a4a87e3d2e1e9160b6ed77678b4bea

(1311)

on March 26, 2012
at 02:19 AM

That doesn't make any sense - you need honey in the coconut cream/milk for the bacteria to feed on - otherwise there is nothing to make them grow - cows milk already has natural sugar but when making coconut yoghurt you need to add it.

3eca93d2e56dfcd768197dc5a50944f2

(11697)

on March 25, 2012
at 06:57 PM

I agree, Trader Joe's goat yogurt has tapioca in it, and it feels like yogurt+potatoes. It's awful. So I made my own, and initially, I used gelatin. It's the one I'd recommend too.

94a4a87e3d2e1e9160b6ed77678b4bea

(1311)

on November 12, 2011
at 11:29 PM

Thanks Jamie - I will try gelatin in my next batch

E36cb992cf0a5eba8b97a359c15f38b3

(4347)

on November 12, 2011
at 02:26 AM

I would use gelatin if you're not averse to the idea. I personally find tapioca starch to taste like chalk, which is rather unpleasant in yogurt.

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25482)

on November 12, 2011
at 02:20 AM

remove the white of the egg and use egg yolks.....stir in slowly.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on November 12, 2011
at 01:58 AM

This works really well. And save the drips to add to a smoothie.

  • 94a4a87e3d2e1e9160b6ed77678b4bea

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9 Answers

best answer

3
0dc1d63c3d5975f5115f535c6a90c9dd

(2283)

on November 12, 2011
at 01:42 AM

With coconut milk yogurt, you have to use a thickener, such as tapioca starch and gelatin. Here's a great recipe: http://www.cookingtf.com/2011/02/03/coconut-milk-yogurt-2/

E36cb992cf0a5eba8b97a359c15f38b3

(4347)

on November 12, 2011
at 02:26 AM

I would use gelatin if you're not averse to the idea. I personally find tapioca starch to taste like chalk, which is rather unpleasant in yogurt.

94a4a87e3d2e1e9160b6ed77678b4bea

(1311)

on November 12, 2011
at 11:29 PM

Thanks Jamie - I will try gelatin in my next batch

3eca93d2e56dfcd768197dc5a50944f2

(11697)

on March 25, 2012
at 06:57 PM

I agree, Trader Joe's goat yogurt has tapioca in it, and it feels like yogurt+potatoes. It's awful. So I made my own, and initially, I used gelatin. It's the one I'd recommend too.

1
Bb4b4a43f76db4977a3b63721a7c10e7

(215)

on November 12, 2011
at 01:40 AM

Might wanna try some agar agar - its a seaweed thickening agent that could work. Find it at most whole foods, trader joes or similar store.

1
Df7cf48be85c91165f9f39f1fe462e41

on November 12, 2011
at 01:02 AM

Maybe try placing a coffee filter in a colander or sieve over a bowl. Then pour your yogurt into the coffee filter and let it sit over the bowl in the fridge overnight. By morning it would have drained off enough excess liquid to make it thicker. I haven't tried this, but I've heard of others doing this with regular yogurt with good results.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on November 12, 2011
at 01:58 AM

This works really well. And save the drips to add to a smoothie.

0
1bf7f88d5ee25f5f45bf628b6eaf7989

on May 03, 2013
at 01:06 PM

cocnut has natural sugar in it as well - I don't add any sweetener to 'feed' the culture - I just use several probiotic capsules and it is delicious!

0
24ea6540b99b899f2b7a4c1c1a453094

on September 29, 2012
at 04:55 PM

Honey is a natural antibacterial & will kill off the beneficial bacteria you are trying to culture in your yogurt.

94a4a87e3d2e1e9160b6ed77678b4bea

(1311)

on October 08, 2012
at 09:31 PM

Incorrect. Honey only acts like this on its own.

0
C95aef4ece95dfe6132543a7a66be3e0

(120)

on March 25, 2012
at 07:42 AM

less liquid before ferment, wait til after ferment to add honey as it will kill the probiotics or lessen potency due to the anticeptic nature of honey

94a4a87e3d2e1e9160b6ed77678b4bea

(1311)

on March 26, 2012
at 02:19 AM

That doesn't make any sense - you need honey in the coconut cream/milk for the bacteria to feed on - otherwise there is nothing to make them grow - cows milk already has natural sugar but when making coconut yoghurt you need to add it.

0
E1057c6f8e29f5e841755512697ceb63

on January 13, 2012
at 05:37 PM

1.5 tbsp Gelatin OR 1.5 tsp agar powder that has been dissolved into 1/2 cup boiling water OR 1 tsp pectin.

0
9ac8a7b68cf079b22de42b703e466e64

(787)

on November 12, 2011
at 01:27 AM

I think you could add a little honey to the coconut milk before you pitched the yeast starter (or other yogurt) in the mix. It should give it a little more sugar for the bacteria to feed on. Or as NewPaleoMamaAz suggested, you could try straining it, similar to the process for greek yogurt.

0
Cf4e7d927a48582cc22adbe59bfd0b2d

on November 12, 2011
at 12:42 AM

This might seem a little obvious, and you may have already tried it, but have you thought to use more of the thick coconut cream and less of the thinner liquid that is produced during separation?

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