1

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how to get my parents to buy me more paleo foods?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created September 16, 2011 at 2:11 PM

Things like coconut milk, almond butter, etc. It's more expensive, but I'm so much more healthier and I'm performing better in sports. Plus I'm not eating as much (mostly because there's not much to eat...) so It's kind of balanced in terms of expenses. any advice?

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on September 20, 2011
at 01:33 PM

Depends on the amount of soy really. The most soy I eat is in the form of wheat-free tamari. A really minimal amount, and likely only matters if you have a documented sensitivity to it.

7d0c3ea9bf8be00b93e6433d8f125ac3

(7540)

on September 20, 2011
at 03:14 AM

I would say that eliminating soy should be part of that 80%, there's really nothing good about it.

6b365c14c646462210f3ef6b6fecace1

(1784)

on September 17, 2011
at 01:22 AM

work your way up! show them what you're capable of and that age ain't nothing but a number! In a short time, your family will witness the miracle that comes from taking charge of your health and eating whole REAL foods :-)

Dd0244b4368083d25ae9eb8533211d2e

(160)

on September 17, 2011
at 12:33 AM

and we aren't at all on a tight budget. they are just self righteous.

Dd0244b4368083d25ae9eb8533211d2e

(160)

on September 17, 2011
at 12:33 AM

I was thinking about this.. I just scored a job as a vets assistant, and I don't want to waste it on stupid stuff so I might as well spend a bit on food. But I'm only 15 so ... minimum wage :(

1568416ef28477d1fa29046218d83ddd

(6235)

on September 16, 2011
at 07:22 PM

Thanks :) It wasn't great for my family nutritionally, knowing what I know now. On the other hand it meant that when I moved out I knew how to menu plan shop and cook within a budget, which was a really good skill to learn while still at home :)

35a8b223ae5d863f17a8c9e3a8eed5eb

(571)

on September 16, 2011
at 06:01 PM

best suggestion! The other ones (convincing parents) are a failure and only work in theory.

Cc49234f065a33c763ab09fa234d08eb

(292)

on September 16, 2011
at 04:20 PM

Extra income from a job is always good. Then you can choose what to spend it on. :)

Cfc7dee889a66db9cd76c4f348109294

(1652)

on September 16, 2011
at 04:03 PM

Great suggestion

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11 Answers

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13
6b365c14c646462210f3ef6b6fecace1

(1784)

on September 16, 2011
at 02:59 PM

This will sound really mean but please don't take it the wrong way. I don't know what the financial situation of you family is like but let's assume that you're all on a tight budget. With that said, getting a weekly allowance might be tough, and affording fresh produce/ meats/ and other suitable "paleo" staples is going to be difficult. Instead of relying on your parents, I suggest you take charge and get a job to have a source of independent income. It's inevitable, so why not start now?

There would be many benefits to getting a job - For example, your parents would be proud (hopefully), your friends will look up to you, you learn how to handle money, and you decide what you get to eat! I'm sure there's a lot more...

Again, this is in no way meant to be a mean suggestion! I hope you find a resolution :-)

Cc49234f065a33c763ab09fa234d08eb

(292)

on September 16, 2011
at 04:20 PM

Extra income from a job is always good. Then you can choose what to spend it on. :)

6b365c14c646462210f3ef6b6fecace1

(1784)

on September 17, 2011
at 01:22 AM

work your way up! show them what you're capable of and that age ain't nothing but a number! In a short time, your family will witness the miracle that comes from taking charge of your health and eating whole REAL foods :-)

35a8b223ae5d863f17a8c9e3a8eed5eb

(571)

on September 16, 2011
at 06:01 PM

best suggestion! The other ones (convincing parents) are a failure and only work in theory.

Dd0244b4368083d25ae9eb8533211d2e

(160)

on September 17, 2011
at 12:33 AM

and we aren't at all on a tight budget. they are just self righteous.

Dd0244b4368083d25ae9eb8533211d2e

(160)

on September 17, 2011
at 12:33 AM

I was thinking about this.. I just scored a job as a vets assistant, and I don't want to waste it on stupid stuff so I might as well spend a bit on food. But I'm only 15 so ... minimum wage :(

7
7d0c3ea9bf8be00b93e6433d8f125ac3

(7540)

on September 16, 2011
at 05:11 PM

1) You don't NEED fancy nut butters, coconut products, almond milk, etc. to be paleo. Leafy greens and other vegetables, tubers, organ meats, cheaper cuts of meat, eggs, butter and so on are not expensive and should be the kinds of foods that form the backbone of your diet, not coconut and almond milk. Plus this is a great time to learn to budget for your own food and cook if you haven't already. When you move out you'll be grateful you took the time to do that now, and you'll look so much better than most of your peers who can only reheat jarred pasta sauce and don't know how to boil an egg and have to survive off of ramen :P

2) Seconding the suggestion to get a part-time job. Making your own spending money feels a lot better than just begging your parents for more allowance and it might show them that you're responsible and really serious about eating well. If your family is on a tight budget it's not really fair to expect them to just revamp their spending habits just for you. So show them that you're ready to take an active role in this.

Good luck!

5
1568416ef28477d1fa29046218d83ddd

(6235)

on September 16, 2011
at 02:18 PM

Well this is what I did as a teen when I wanted more control over what I ate. I got my parents to give me a weekly budget, wrote a menu and did the shopping within that budget and cooked.

If any was left over from what was usually spent on food I got to keep it.

That was hard to maintain so it only lasted about 6months, but it changed how we ate because it only takes about two to create a habit.

1568416ef28477d1fa29046218d83ddd

(6235)

on September 16, 2011
at 07:22 PM

Thanks :) It wasn't great for my family nutritionally, knowing what I know now. On the other hand it meant that when I moved out I knew how to menu plan shop and cook within a budget, which was a really good skill to learn while still at home :)

Cfc7dee889a66db9cd76c4f348109294

(1652)

on September 16, 2011
at 04:03 PM

Great suggestion

2
306aa57660d911781231f8090c2a5619

(3808)

on September 19, 2011
at 06:01 PM

"Plus I'm not eating as much (mostly because there's not much to eat...) so It's kind of balanced in terms of expenses." - Don't say this. As a parent, this would make me concerned about an eating disorder - putting strict dietary rules above overall nutritional/caloric needs. It's also a little nonsensical - "This method of eating saves money because I'm not eating much because there's not much for me to eat, so buy me more food."

Do your homework. Be prepared to explain to your parents what you feel the benefits are, how you're going to meet your nutritional needs, and what exactly you need from them.

Look at your family's current buying habits. How would buying paleo change things? If you're currently buying a ton of processed/pre-prepared food, going paleo might help the budget. If the family food budget is pretty much bare-bones as it is, there may legitimately not be room for changes. Be aware that your parents may be sheltering you from financial realities to some extent (for example, if they were utilizing a food distribution program of some sort). Look at budget paleo blogs and posts on this site to determine how you can best integrate paleo foods into a limited budget, lower cost sources of ingredients, and what is most important.

They may be more receptive if you frame it in terms of you preparing meals for the whole family or otherwise reducing work for your parents (ie. packing your own lunch if you don't already), rather than special food for you. If you will be preparing food for yourself, make sure that you clean up after yourself and don't otherwise add to their housework load.

If they aren't willing/able to help, I agree with the comments about paying for and learning to cook your own food. Learning to cook real food is a valuable life skill that so many kids don't learn! Personally, I took cooking classes as a kid, prepared occasional family meals (usually something involving combining pre-prepared ingredients), and thought I could cook, but very little of what I learned was practical, everyday meal, real food type stuff. I could follow a recipe, but had no clue how to cook meat or prepare vegetables palatably until well into adulthood.

If your parents will not support you in this and you can't be in charge of your own food for whatever reason, keep in mind that this is a temporary situation. In a few years, you'll be entirely in charge of your own food. It feels like a long time now, but it isn't. Make the best nutritional choices that you can now, but try to take the long-term view of things, and know that things will change and your whole life isn't being ruined.

2
F4d04667059bc682540fdfd8b40f13a7

on September 16, 2011
at 03:01 PM

Could you get them interested in Paleo? If they'd try it for 30 days perhaps their own results would get them fully on board?

2
24fcc21452ebe39c032be6801d6bbadd

(9812)

on September 16, 2011
at 02:17 PM

If these foods are replacing junk food, that may be a good rationale! Less Little Debbies= more $ for almond butter

1
361e96d70d6d3b91d63f6ad975e60ab6

(840)

on September 20, 2011
at 02:43 AM

I started paleo around 15 too and my only choice was to start buying all my own food. Part-time job is a must. So I eat super paleo inexpensive (organ meats, cheat cuts)

1
C835934198ffe146cb90eebc22c6b8d8

on September 16, 2011
at 04:55 PM

Tell them its cheaper in the long run to buy quality foods and spend less money on healthcare. Plus it gets them to be healthier, more energetic and around longer for Grandchildren some day ;-) hehe Also I find personally I am fuller longer on paleo diet so it evens out buying less food.

0
93ae9f2d376e5426e891a9b58d8302fa

(2936)

on September 20, 2011
at 03:14 AM

This is a selfish answer, in my own self-interest, because I want you to learn something and then come back and teach the rest of us (especially me). So here it is:

EAT BUGS!

0
32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on September 20, 2011
at 02:25 AM

The best thing you can do is to control what you put in your mouth, especially if you can't control what's in your kitchen. Prioritize and don't become some paleo snob. Stick to unprocessed foods, minimal seed oils, and that's maybe 80% of paleo results right there. The last 20% are things like grass-fed meats, eliminating soy, etc...

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on September 20, 2011
at 01:33 PM

Depends on the amount of soy really. The most soy I eat is in the form of wheat-free tamari. A really minimal amount, and likely only matters if you have a documented sensitivity to it.

7d0c3ea9bf8be00b93e6433d8f125ac3

(7540)

on September 20, 2011
at 03:14 AM

I would say that eliminating soy should be part of that 80%, there's really nothing good about it.

0
00e8ce6244e5a39951d254e2f877a19c

on September 16, 2011
at 03:05 PM

Have you asked them? Explain why you eat Paleo. Explain the health benefits. Explain the personal benefits you've experienced. Make a list of the foods/recipes you'd like to have on hand. Ask to go shopping with your parents to show them where the items are and for you to see what the costs are. If they see that you are putting your health first, they're likely to at least jump on board with you eating this way, even if they're uninterested in doing it themselves.

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