1

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Coconut Oil: Mold in Refined vs. Un-refined . . .

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created March 28, 2013 at 4:47 PM

  1. Is UN-refined coconut oil likely to be contaminated with MOLD?

  2. Would REFINED coconut oil be less likely to be contaminated with MOLD?

  3. Does the refining process destroy all the goodness of unrefined coconut oil? I'm beginning a low-mold n=1 trial.

Thanks, Mike

4bd4e2fe6a095663f80c69656936e487

(744)

on April 14, 2013
at 06:27 PM

Aren't there many different methods of refining?

74fc529b6a0f2b1323ab98f16368ca8b

on April 09, 2013
at 01:43 AM

I can't speak to additives, but sodium hydroxide is a pretty standard refinement medium. The antimicrobal effect of coconut oil is becuase of its lauric acid content. The body is able to convert the lauric acid into monolaurin, a particular biologically active fatty acid which helps create a protective barrier for the good bacteria. Refined coconut oil has been deodorized, bleached, and high-heat treated. Although 92% of the saturated fats in coconut oil are unaffected, this treatment strips the oil of the 8% fatty acid content, removing the lauric acid and the antimicrobal effect.

33266cca338ab54cee9a2aa160f5bdb6

(502)

on April 08, 2013
at 01:37 PM

This is not true. You can buy organic, steam refined coconut oil that does not contain any additives as far I'm aware. Are you sure that refining it destroys the anti-microbial effect? I thought the fat itself was antimicrobial, am I wrong?

2006ccb2b60f9cc5ba5e8eff8a7abc46

(1533)

on March 31, 2013
at 02:59 AM

dr. bronners brand coconut oil is pretty amazing, its my favorite so far

7fc82eebafd44badc73c520f44660150

(3275)

on March 29, 2013
at 02:51 AM

That makes sense, thank you. I hope (I think) the mold hypothesis pans out. The histamine thing didn't fit 100%, though there is lots of overlap in the foods to avoid.

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2 Answers

best answer

1
74fc529b6a0f2b1323ab98f16368ca8b

on March 31, 2013
at 02:53 AM

  1. A high quality, extra-virgin unrefined coconut oil will not have mold. Since the coconuts are cold-pressed while they are fresh, not dried, and without any heat sources, the coconut oil is able to maintain its natural antibiotic, antimicrobal, antifungal properties.

  2. A refined coconut oil is not likely to contain mold either since it will be infused with the chemical compound sodium hydroxide, but it will have lost its natural antibiotic, antimicrobal, antiprotizoal, antifungal, and antibiotic qualities as soon as the moisture was removed and the product was heated over 120 degrees.

  3. The refining process effectively destroys the properties of coconut oil that make it so nutrient-rich and give coconut oil its health benefits. A natural, organic unrefined coconut oil will have a fresh coconut aroma, is soft to the touch, not waxy, and does not have the same uniformity as refined coconut oil does. Refined coconut oil is deodorized, bleached, heated, and chemical treated.

The best organic natural coconut oil that I have tasted or used is Perfect Coconut Oil, a cold-pressed oil with a long shelf life, a great smell, and very minimal processing.

2006ccb2b60f9cc5ba5e8eff8a7abc46

(1533)

on March 31, 2013
at 02:59 AM

dr. bronners brand coconut oil is pretty amazing, its my favorite so far

33266cca338ab54cee9a2aa160f5bdb6

(502)

on April 08, 2013
at 01:37 PM

This is not true. You can buy organic, steam refined coconut oil that does not contain any additives as far I'm aware. Are you sure that refining it destroys the anti-microbial effect? I thought the fat itself was antimicrobial, am I wrong?

74fc529b6a0f2b1323ab98f16368ca8b

on April 09, 2013
at 01:43 AM

I can't speak to additives, but sodium hydroxide is a pretty standard refinement medium. The antimicrobal effect of coconut oil is becuase of its lauric acid content. The body is able to convert the lauric acid into monolaurin, a particular biologically active fatty acid which helps create a protective barrier for the good bacteria. Refined coconut oil has been deodorized, bleached, and high-heat treated. Although 92% of the saturated fats in coconut oil are unaffected, this treatment strips the oil of the 8% fatty acid content, removing the lauric acid and the antimicrobal effect.

4bd4e2fe6a095663f80c69656936e487

(744)

on April 14, 2013
at 06:27 PM

Aren't there many different methods of refining?

1
F20af1e0c77eff221d556e3db0fc5684

on March 28, 2013
at 10:38 PM

For the purposes of avoiding all mold, I would guess that fractionalized/fractionated (not hydrogenated) refined coconut oil would be best (given how thoroughly it's refined and its very long shelf-life). You would lose some phytonutrients compared to unrefined oil, but you could evaluate that trade-off after seeing how your trial goes.

7fc82eebafd44badc73c520f44660150

(3275)

on March 29, 2013
at 02:51 AM

That makes sense, thank you. I hope (I think) the mold hypothesis pans out. The histamine thing didn't fit 100%, though there is lots of overlap in the foods to avoid.

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