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Coconut Milk Yogurt Troubleshooting

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created August 25, 2011 at 2:08 PM

This is my first attempt at making homemade coconut milk yogurt. The big caution in all the recipes I've found is to not overheat it. What happens if it does get too hot. Will it just kill the bacteria, or will it make me sick to eat it once it's cooled.
I've also found large time discrepancies among the recipes. Some say I only have to wait 8 hours to enjoy the final product, while others claim 18 minimum. Why the difference? I apologize for making this a 2-parter, but I haven't been able to locate this info. Thanks

8e1876a74536739ecf7bef97d5d97b76

(747)

on August 25, 2011
at 09:56 PM

o.k. I had only done it with goats milk

Aead76beb5fc7b762a6b4ddc234f6051

(15239)

on August 25, 2011
at 04:37 PM

because i think that she is using the yogurt as a vehicle for the live, active cultures.

Aead76beb5fc7b762a6b4ddc234f6051

(15239)

on August 25, 2011
at 04:36 PM

actually, i think that making yogurt with non-dairy milk is a one shot deal. the cultures wont survive to a second generation in soy, coconut or almond milks.

47dd02c94fd5d28412e82007d03e257d

(0)

on August 25, 2011
at 03:20 PM

Thanks, this is actually the recipe I started with, but I struggled with the incubation. Good to know it's on the right track. Is 18 hours necessary, though? The one container that made it through the incubating is pretty sour, although it smells delicious. Will cutting the time still give me enough great bacteria. I'll power through the sour if I have to. Thanks.

47dd02c94fd5d28412e82007d03e257d

(0)

on August 25, 2011
at 03:16 PM

Oh wow! Actually, that does make me feel a bit almighty :) Will it eventually lose potency, or can I continue saving starters from each batch indefinitely?

8e1876a74536739ecf7bef97d5d97b76

(747)

on August 25, 2011
at 02:55 PM

p.s.- Save one of the containers back and then you never have to buy culture again because you are breeding your own culture. (Don't you kinda feel all powerful now... you are in charge of a whole culture!)

Aead76beb5fc7b762a6b4ddc234f6051

(15239)

on August 25, 2011
at 02:50 PM

never made it with coconut- just heavy cream and milk- but overheating it will just kill the culture and you will have to start over with new culture. it wont make you sick or anything. it will still taste good, just wont be alive.

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3 Answers

2
345c1755efe005edd162b770dc6fb821

(8767)

on August 25, 2011
at 02:16 PM

I've made it several times with decent results most times. I think varying things can cause it to be slightly different (ie: using a different honey or different batch of whey or a different brand of unflavored gelatin). I guess anything could cause it to come out different each time you make it, including not heating to the right temp, or heating too fast or not allowing to cool down to the right temp.

I always use a candy thermometer to be safe, it doesn't need to boil, just get to the right temp.

I've stuck with the recipes that 'ferment' with whey, I've had very good results because it keeps a very long time (ie: coconut yogurt, mayo)

This isn't what I normally use, but its close: (sorry wiped my computer out and cant find the link) http://www.smallfootprintfamily.com/2009/04/25/homemade-coconut-milk-yogurt/

47dd02c94fd5d28412e82007d03e257d

(0)

on August 25, 2011
at 03:20 PM

Thanks, this is actually the recipe I started with, but I struggled with the incubation. Good to know it's on the right track. Is 18 hours necessary, though? The one container that made it through the incubating is pretty sour, although it smells delicious. Will cutting the time still give me enough great bacteria. I'll power through the sour if I have to. Thanks.

0
8e1876a74536739ecf7bef97d5d97b76

(747)

on August 25, 2011
at 02:51 PM

http://www.google.com/products/catalog?q=yogurt+machine&um=1&ie=UTF-8&tbm=shop&cid=17177648148388547233&sa=X&ei=P2FWTvDuE6_SiAL1r8iSCQ&ved=0CHgQ8wIwAQ

I had one of these as a kid (not this exact one mind you) but it's meant to make sure you don't get it too hot/cold and we made our own goats milk yogurt as a kid.

8e1876a74536739ecf7bef97d5d97b76

(747)

on August 25, 2011
at 02:55 PM

p.s.- Save one of the containers back and then you never have to buy culture again because you are breeding your own culture. (Don't you kinda feel all powerful now... you are in charge of a whole culture!)

8e1876a74536739ecf7bef97d5d97b76

(747)

on August 25, 2011
at 09:56 PM

o.k. I had only done it with goats milk

Aead76beb5fc7b762a6b4ddc234f6051

(15239)

on August 25, 2011
at 04:36 PM

actually, i think that making yogurt with non-dairy milk is a one shot deal. the cultures wont survive to a second generation in soy, coconut or almond milks.

47dd02c94fd5d28412e82007d03e257d

(0)

on August 25, 2011
at 03:16 PM

Oh wow! Actually, that does make me feel a bit almighty :) Will it eventually lose potency, or can I continue saving starters from each batch indefinitely?

-1
99bd7f8b1170a1e9e56b93d9d53b51cc

(193)

on August 25, 2011
at 03:07 PM

why not save yourself time and trouble - i just open a can of proper coconut milk with no preservatives/thickeners etc - scoop the cream that separates from the coconut water in the can, add a little lemon/lime juice to mimic the acidity of real yoghurt - and voila - you have practically the same taste and definitely the same texture/consistency of yoghurt in around 2 minutes! chill for a thicker consistency and add vanilla extract to sweeten.

Aead76beb5fc7b762a6b4ddc234f6051

(15239)

on August 25, 2011
at 04:37 PM

because i think that she is using the yogurt as a vehicle for the live, active cultures.

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