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Coconut chips valid fat source?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created March 01, 2012 at 3:33 PM

In the mornings while on my work days...i greab hard boiled eggs, a chicken breasts, and i want to have more fat to stay satiated...so ive been having a few handfuls of raw unsweetened coconut chips... is this a valid source of fat? or not worth it?

11b7b7ba720a5cd43c74a0ef99a16adb

(3448)

on March 01, 2012
at 05:11 PM

Worried about saturated fat and cholesterol? Really? We've become so focused on heart disease, that we've lost sight of the fact that there are MORE DANGERS associated with low cholesterol levels than high. For example, your brain synapses must contain high levels of cholesterol to function properly. This is why low cholesterol levels are associated with mental impairment. And, this is just one of many health problems associated with low cholesterol After decades of pushing low cholesterol to prevent heart disease, we're finding out now that the cure may have been worse than the disease.

06935be03aaa3cc589afb3b5e01268ad

(158)

on March 01, 2012
at 04:02 PM

For me, other bits of chicken sounds like the best choice.

06935be03aaa3cc589afb3b5e01268ad

(158)

on March 01, 2012
at 04:00 PM

Sounds like a better idea than the coconut chips..

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4 Answers

2
D5d982a898721d3392c85f951d0bf0aa

(2417)

on March 01, 2012
at 03:40 PM

If coconut oil is good, the whole food should be just as good if not better! I like my coconut chips lightly toasted in the oven and sprinkled with a bit of sea salt and cinnamon. Nomnomnom.

2
Ccacf7567273244733bc991af4ac42ed

on March 01, 2012
at 03:39 PM

It's valid enough, and if it's doing the trick I'd say it's worth it. Switching the chicken breasts for other bits of chicken with skin and all may help mix things up and make them more satisfying.

06935be03aaa3cc589afb3b5e01268ad

(158)

on March 01, 2012
at 04:00 PM

Sounds like a better idea than the coconut chips..

06935be03aaa3cc589afb3b5e01268ad

(158)

on March 01, 2012
at 04:02 PM

For me, other bits of chicken sounds like the best choice.

0
Fdbda466b23d8f866cd9084173261fa9

on March 01, 2012
at 04:42 PM

Your breakfast sounds as if it might not be satisfying, in part, because you are lacking bulk. Green smoothies are great for satiation. Try kale (or collards are excellent as well) blended with coconut milk, frozen peaches or pineapple, and a little cashew butter. You can toss a clementine in (whole) for zing, or grated ginger. Tinker with proportions until you have a concoction that tastes good--as you will not be inclined to drink it if it isn't tasty. A smoothie provides bulk in the form of kale/collards, and fat in the form of nut butter/coconut. The water required to blend all this into drinkable form is also a good source of hydration. Its a good breakfast to take with you somewhere--highly portable. Just be sip carefully; we tend to drink them out of mason jars, at our house, and sometimes we get a little green mark on the bridge of our nose from the top of the jar. That's not a good look for work. Also consider, for satiation, having a cup of black or herbal tea with coconut milk--which can be very effective.

-1
06935be03aaa3cc589afb3b5e01268ad

(158)

on March 01, 2012
at 04:06 PM

Perhaps this should also be considered:

A 1-oz. serving of unsweetened coconut flakes contains 187 calories and 18.2 g of fat. The majority of the calories in this fruit meat come from fat -- 88 percent of them. Sixteen grams of this fat is saturated, a type of fat that may potentially raise your cholesterol. Coconut fat may also have a negative impact on the brain, contributing to depression, according to a study published in the February 2011 issue of "Brain Research." This study was carried out on fish, so human studies are needed to determine how this correlates to humans.

Read more: http://www.livestrong.com/article/409598-are-unsweetened-coconut-flakes-nutritious/#ixzz1nsjXt3dI

11b7b7ba720a5cd43c74a0ef99a16adb

(3448)

on March 01, 2012
at 05:11 PM

Worried about saturated fat and cholesterol? Really? We've become so focused on heart disease, that we've lost sight of the fact that there are MORE DANGERS associated with low cholesterol levels than high. For example, your brain synapses must contain high levels of cholesterol to function properly. This is why low cholesterol levels are associated with mental impairment. And, this is just one of many health problems associated with low cholesterol After decades of pushing low cholesterol to prevent heart disease, we're finding out now that the cure may have been worse than the disease.

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