4

votes

What can I do with cheap coconut oil?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created January 24, 2011 at 2:24 PM

My mom knew I've been using coconut oil, so she spotted this stuff at Super Walmart and bought it for me.

http://www.louana.com/product-detail.aspx?productID=75&catID=44&pcatID=37

I have been using fancy extra virgin organic stuff from the health food store. Is there anything I can use this for? Or is it just bad news?

C56baa1b4f39839c018180bf63226f7d

(3499)

on May 17, 2012
at 09:55 PM

The Wayback Machine saves the day again: http://web.archive.org/web/20110101050707/http://naturalhealthtechniques.com/HealingTechniques/Dry_Brushing_Technique.htm

E7e7e1c856d4494d4a1b700b6869df90

(982)

on May 17, 2012
at 08:15 PM

There is a differnce between "refined" and "cheap processed".I pay just as much for refined with no coconut scent as I would for Virgin. It is expeller expressed etc. Have not been able to get Virgin lately. and you re right it would be the proteins and not the fat you would be allergic too. Even people with peanut allergies are allergic to the proteins and can consume peanut oil as long as there are no proteins in it.

7bf306ada57db47547e9da39a415edf6

(11214)

on May 17, 2012
at 07:10 PM

More evidence that it is purer- the fat is what solidifies or liquifies based on the temperature.

Ebcbbdcb8b727e69e06eaa102d49a84c

(1804)

on May 17, 2012
at 06:52 PM

Hey, the link was broken that describes Dry Brushing. Can someone repost?

E7e7e1c856d4494d4a1b700b6869df90

(982)

on May 17, 2012
at 03:57 PM

I do not think it is "bad" for you. It should say hydrogenated if it has been and it does NOT say that. It may not be top quality from mature coconuts but I am sure it is okay although possibly not quite as beneficial.

7e746be2f0e550a8cd7df881322ae705

(18701)

on January 25, 2011
at 12:07 AM

I have never been acne prone anywhere other than my face, so I may use it on my arms and legs.

7e746be2f0e550a8cd7df881322ae705

(18701)

on January 25, 2011
at 12:06 AM

Thanks Jay! This was FREE though, so I will use it. Then buy the fancy stuff again next time.

902a7cd8f96bbc917a04e92b1f49dbd7

(787)

on January 24, 2011
at 10:40 PM

Compares virgin and dry process coconut oil (in rats). http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19767885 Just FYI, it's from Kerala, a big coconut producing region.

902a7cd8f96bbc917a04e92b1f49dbd7

(787)

on January 24, 2011
at 10:04 PM

As far as the actual lipids go? Not really. It might have an even higher saturated fat content than the "extra virgin" stuff, because unsaturated fatty acids are processed out or "fully hydrogenated", but other than that the actual fats are pretty much the same.

902a7cd8f96bbc917a04e92b1f49dbd7

(787)

on January 24, 2011
at 10:00 PM

The regular Lou Ana is RBD coconut oil (I did the same research a couple years ago). It is processed to remove most unsaturated fats and free fatty acids, which is part of why it has such an incredible shelf-life. However, it is sometimes "fully hydrogenated" to deal with any stray unsaturated fatty acids. The Lou Ana people assured me that the incidental trans fatty acids produced by this process were at virtually undetectable levels - take from that what you will. I think it's mostly harmless, but I can afford the tasty "cold" pressed, so why not.

902a7cd8f96bbc917a04e92b1f49dbd7

(787)

on January 24, 2011
at 09:54 PM

Be careful about putting it on your skin if you're acne prone, as it can be very comedogenic... but it an amazing emollient.

1471beca8e3adff4ae2f89d10e5f7acb

(6550)

on January 24, 2011
at 08:10 PM

I try, but I am a big ol' sissy about cold water. Moreso in summer than right now!

5e36f73c3f95eb4ea13a009f4936449f

(8280)

on January 24, 2011
at 07:53 PM

I'm pretty sure there's zero research on that. :) Which means it's a personal decision. Read through how it's made, and decide whether or not you really want to be eating that kind of material.

7e746be2f0e550a8cd7df881322ae705

(18701)

on January 24, 2011
at 07:31 PM

Neat! Do you do the hot/cold thing too?

1471beca8e3adff4ae2f89d10e5f7acb

(6550)

on January 24, 2011
at 05:24 PM

Dry brushing: http://www.naturalhealthtechniques.com/healingtechniques/dry_brushing_technique.htm I don't buy into all of the claims, but it has definitely made my skin look better.

7e746be2f0e550a8cd7df881322ae705

(18701)

on January 24, 2011
at 04:51 PM

Well, that's what I figured, but is it bad for me? Or just not as tasty?

7e746be2f0e550a8cd7df881322ae705

(18701)

on January 24, 2011
at 04:50 PM

What is dry brushing?

7e746be2f0e550a8cd7df881322ae705

(18701)

on January 24, 2011
at 04:49 PM

The ingredients just say "Coconut Oil". LOL. I wasn't sure if how it was processed mattered and I didn't really now how to figure that one out.

5841391284e7af8c495c54bd90d3a795

(2764)

on January 24, 2011
at 04:31 PM

@Melissa Premium brands mark up their prices *because* they have a premium name and reputation. If the ingredients list is good and you can't tell the difference then you're probably okay. As much as I dislike WM it doesn't mean their products are all bad.

1471beca8e3adff4ae2f89d10e5f7acb

(6550)

on January 24, 2011
at 04:22 PM

Let me tell you, ladies: working out hard, dry brushing, taking a shower, and then coating yourself in a thin layer of coconut oil is my elixir of youth/happiness/love.

D67e7b481854b02110d5a5b21d6789b1

(4111)

on January 24, 2011
at 04:20 PM

coconut oil on the hair overnight makes for very soft shiny hair!

7e746be2f0e550a8cd7df881322ae705

(18701)

on January 24, 2011
at 03:22 PM

I haven't got quite that deep into my coconut oil yet. I keep thinking about it though.

7e746be2f0e550a8cd7df881322ae705

(18701)

on January 24, 2011
at 03:21 PM

That would be sweet! It just seemed too good to be true, it is 1/4 of the price of the stuff I usually buy.

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12 Answers

12
1471beca8e3adff4ae2f89d10e5f7acb

on January 24, 2011
at 03:02 PM

You can always use it as a moisturizer for your skin and a deep conditioner for your hair, if nothing else!

7e746be2f0e550a8cd7df881322ae705

(18701)

on January 25, 2011
at 12:07 AM

I have never been acne prone anywhere other than my face, so I may use it on my arms and legs.

7e746be2f0e550a8cd7df881322ae705

(18701)

on January 24, 2011
at 03:22 PM

I haven't got quite that deep into my coconut oil yet. I keep thinking about it though.

1471beca8e3adff4ae2f89d10e5f7acb

(6550)

on January 24, 2011
at 05:24 PM

Dry brushing: http://www.naturalhealthtechniques.com/healingtechniques/dry_brushing_technique.htm I don't buy into all of the claims, but it has definitely made my skin look better.

902a7cd8f96bbc917a04e92b1f49dbd7

(787)

on January 24, 2011
at 09:54 PM

Be careful about putting it on your skin if you're acne prone, as it can be very comedogenic... but it an amazing emollient.

7e746be2f0e550a8cd7df881322ae705

(18701)

on January 24, 2011
at 04:50 PM

What is dry brushing?

1471beca8e3adff4ae2f89d10e5f7acb

(6550)

on January 24, 2011
at 08:10 PM

I try, but I am a big ol' sissy about cold water. Moreso in summer than right now!

D67e7b481854b02110d5a5b21d6789b1

(4111)

on January 24, 2011
at 04:20 PM

coconut oil on the hair overnight makes for very soft shiny hair!

1471beca8e3adff4ae2f89d10e5f7acb

(6550)

on January 24, 2011
at 04:22 PM

Let me tell you, ladies: working out hard, dry brushing, taking a shower, and then coating yourself in a thin layer of coconut oil is my elixir of youth/happiness/love.

7e746be2f0e550a8cd7df881322ae705

(18701)

on January 24, 2011
at 07:31 PM

Neat! Do you do the hot/cold thing too?

Ebcbbdcb8b727e69e06eaa102d49a84c

(1804)

on May 17, 2012
at 06:52 PM

Hey, the link was broken that describes Dry Brushing. Can someone repost?

C56baa1b4f39839c018180bf63226f7d

(3499)

on May 17, 2012
at 09:55 PM

The Wayback Machine saves the day again: http://web.archive.org/web/20110101050707/http://naturalhealthtechniques.com/HealingTechniques/Dry_Brushing_Technique.htm

4
Ef9f83cb4e1826261a44c173f733789e

on January 24, 2011
at 03:08 PM

I used that brand from Walmart once and I don't see what's wrong with it. I used it for cooking and also ate it straight.

7e746be2f0e550a8cd7df881322ae705

(18701)

on January 24, 2011
at 03:21 PM

That would be sweet! It just seemed too good to be true, it is 1/4 of the price of the stuff I usually buy.

7e746be2f0e550a8cd7df881322ae705

(18701)

on January 25, 2011
at 12:06 AM

Thanks Jay! This was FREE though, so I will use it. Then buy the fancy stuff again next time.

5841391284e7af8c495c54bd90d3a795

(2764)

on January 24, 2011
at 04:31 PM

@Melissa Premium brands mark up their prices *because* they have a premium name and reputation. If the ingredients list is good and you can't tell the difference then you're probably okay. As much as I dislike WM it doesn't mean their products are all bad.

902a7cd8f96bbc917a04e92b1f49dbd7

(787)

on January 24, 2011
at 10:00 PM

The regular Lou Ana is RBD coconut oil (I did the same research a couple years ago). It is processed to remove most unsaturated fats and free fatty acids, which is part of why it has such an incredible shelf-life. However, it is sometimes "fully hydrogenated" to deal with any stray unsaturated fatty acids. The Lou Ana people assured me that the incidental trans fatty acids produced by this process were at virtually undetectable levels - take from that what you will. I think it's mostly harmless, but I can afford the tasty "cold" pressed, so why not.

7e746be2f0e550a8cd7df881322ae705

(18701)

on January 24, 2011
at 04:49 PM

The ingredients just say "Coconut Oil". LOL. I wasn't sure if how it was processed mattered and I didn't really now how to figure that one out.

3
3e24700b888d4ac599d664f08fb2fdc1

on May 17, 2012
at 05:05 AM

That tropical traditions page has some good info, exlaining how expeller pressed stuff is good. Expeller pressed coconut oil also has less odour and taste but some.

This page explains it's still okay: http://180degreehealth.com/2010/11/refined-coconut-oil Due to the stability of the oil it isn't much damaged in processing.

Also, the Tropical Traditions page itself states that they found more antioxidants in coconut oil processed with heat than not. Apparently a traditional way of making it (which they do not use) was to boil coconut milk until the oil separated.

RBD coconut oil is made from copra which has mould and bacteria. The processing can involve heat, and then due to the mould and bacteria it has to go through filtering with solvents. But this isn't necessarily bad again. That's explained here: http://www.coconut-oil-central.com/rbd-coconut-oil.html under the title 'Still Healthy.'

Fractionated coconut oil apparently has a longer shelf life than other coconut oil. I can't comment on residue from solvents, but if it were damaged by heat in processing it should go rancid, rather than be the most stable of oils. Also, having no taste or odour, it can be convenient for some uses. Fractionated is when they get RBD and separate the oil without solvents, leaving only medium chain fatty acids. Medium chain are better for you, and the oil is liquid at room temperature, very thin. It is used as a massage oil.

2
66e6b190e62fb3bcf42d4c60801c7bf6

on January 24, 2011
at 09:31 PM

i was also using an expensive brand that cost 3-4x as much. then my brother's girlfriend brought over the wm brand and honestly, i can't tell the difference between the two. maybe somebody more suited than me can answer if it's so biochemically different from the extra virgin organic stuff that it doesn't have the same effects but if it's not, i'll be using this stuff...

902a7cd8f96bbc917a04e92b1f49dbd7

(787)

on January 24, 2011
at 10:04 PM

As far as the actual lipids go? Not really. It might have an even higher saturated fat content than the "extra virgin" stuff, because unsaturated fatty acids are processed out or "fully hydrogenated", but other than that the actual fats are pretty much the same.

1
7bf306ada57db47547e9da39a415edf6

(11214)

on May 17, 2012
at 04:27 PM

This is an interesting dispute, and for a while I was totally down with the raw/virgin/ everything in the most natural state possible, but I think may be allergic to coconut oil, and the prime culprit isn't the fat, but certain proteins that are in the expensive virgin stuff, not in the cheap processed stuff. I used that brand before and it's okay to eat it. It doesn't taste as strongly of coconut so you may be able to fry with it in situations where you would find the expensive stuff too overpowering.

E7e7e1c856d4494d4a1b700b6869df90

(982)

on May 17, 2012
at 08:15 PM

There is a differnce between "refined" and "cheap processed".I pay just as much for refined with no coconut scent as I would for Virgin. It is expeller expressed etc. Have not been able to get Virgin lately. and you re right it would be the proteins and not the fat you would be allergic too. Even people with peanut allergies are allergic to the proteins and can consume peanut oil as long as there are no proteins in it.

1
9267cb2507141e9a72e9d7159a5ffb80

on May 17, 2012
at 05:36 AM

Try to use it as a deep skin moisturizer and for oil pulling

1
5e36f73c3f95eb4ea13a009f4936449f

(8280)

on January 24, 2011
at 04:43 PM

Cheap coconut oil is usually refined/chemically treated/bleached from the really crappy coconut left overs.

Tropical Traditions lists out the common ways Coconut Oil is made on this page:

http://www.tropicaltraditions.com/what_is_virgin_coconut_oil.htm

5e36f73c3f95eb4ea13a009f4936449f

(8280)

on January 24, 2011
at 07:53 PM

I'm pretty sure there's zero research on that. :) Which means it's a personal decision. Read through how it's made, and decide whether or not you really want to be eating that kind of material.

7e746be2f0e550a8cd7df881322ae705

(18701)

on January 24, 2011
at 04:51 PM

Well, that's what I figured, but is it bad for me? Or just not as tasty?

902a7cd8f96bbc917a04e92b1f49dbd7

(787)

on January 24, 2011
at 10:40 PM

Compares virgin and dry process coconut oil (in rats). http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19767885 Just FYI, it's from Kerala, a big coconut producing region.

E7e7e1c856d4494d4a1b700b6869df90

(982)

on May 17, 2012
at 03:57 PM

I do not think it is "bad" for you. It should say hydrogenated if it has been and it does NOT say that. It may not be top quality from mature coconuts but I am sure it is okay although possibly not quite as beneficial.

0
96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19463)

on September 05, 2013
at 04:25 PM

As long as it hasn't been extracted with some evil process such as involving hexane, it's probably ok. Are the MCT fractions still there? If not, I'd say it's not as useful as the other brands.

0
7e1cb5cfd763644a85dca54331652b4b

on September 05, 2013
at 03:48 AM

Years before Coconut oil became the next new health thing it is today, I read a book called the Coconut Oil Miracle. The author was a nutritionist on a mission to help people see that they were neglecting one of the healthiest oils available. The book describes in detail the chemistry and biology behind these health benefits. That particular author stated that in the case of coconut oil (while not the case with many other oils) the amount of processing did not affect the chemistry of the oil. It's health attributes are not changed by the processing that takes the flavor and texture of the coconut particles out of it. It is highly stable, not hydrogenated (yet gets solid below a certain temp and can be used much like icky Crisco) and can withstand very high temperatures that other good fats can't (without changing to something unhealthy). I laugh at the thought of people who now are buying the expensive stuff and putting up with everything tasting like coconut (ok for some things but who wants coconut scrambled eggs?). I'm guessing the stuff for popcorn is simply a processed, clarified form of the oil. It would be fantastic for frying (just think, no guilt fried chicken and fries!) I'd definitely give it a try. And remember: The Health and Wellness industry has it's greedy side too. They want to tell you that their product is better because.... and usually it sounds good to say "virgin, unprocessed" but what good does that do if people try it and can't stand the taste so don't use it?? It's a dis-service.

0
60767a6647c9dcd27c2edfba1676886d

on July 27, 2012
at 08:03 PM

As a nurse, I can tell you that you are correct about the protein that you are most likely allergic to. Allergies are almost exclusively caused by proteins. I saw solid coconut oil being sold in a bulk box of 35lbs for like $45 at The Web Restaurant Store for use with popcorn. They had both solid and solid white. But even with googling it, I couldn't find out whether you could use it for other cooking. Is there a difference with this type of coconut oil that makes it only for popcorn? It's a great price, otherwise.

0
5662d1262516ccbd70249e7aeaf58901

(681)

on May 18, 2012
at 01:15 AM

Burn it in an oil lamp.

0
Ebcbbdcb8b727e69e06eaa102d49a84c

on May 17, 2012
at 06:54 PM

In a moment of excessive broke-ness, I bought this stuff too. One of the main differences I've noticed is the stuff melts a lot quicker. If I leave my A/C on 80 during the day (summer in Texas), it's completely melted by the time I come home. This doesn't happen with the more expensive stuff.

So several times the stuff has been melted and hardened. Not sure if this has any negative effect on it.

As for taste, I haven't noticed any difference really.

7bf306ada57db47547e9da39a415edf6

(11214)

on May 17, 2012
at 07:10 PM

More evidence that it is purer- the fat is what solidifies or liquifies based on the temperature.

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