1

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What do you guys think of coconut nectar?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created October 27, 2012 at 12:34 PM

Ok, for the record I hardly ever use sweeteners. Except this morning I used maybe a half of a tablespoon of coconut nectar on my coconut flour pancakes. I only make these on weekends. I'm just curious if this is a good sweetener to use on those occasional times when I do need a sweetener, like for a pumpkin pie I'll make on Halloween. Or is this stuff going to kill me and make me gain over nine thousand pounds?

61f9349ad28e3c42d1cec58ba4825a7d

(10490)

on October 28, 2012
at 02:12 PM

No, it does not necessarily, nursling, though that is the case with agave nectar.

61f9349ad28e3c42d1cec58ba4825a7d

(10490)

on October 28, 2012
at 02:11 PM

Please explain how coconut nectar is so processed. The information I can find, presumably from the manufacturer, is that it is sap from the coconut tree, allowed to dry and thicken at temperatures no higher than an average tropical day so that it is raw. It doesn't say, but maybe it is filtered or something, too. Honey I can see, but maple syrup is flat-out boiled for long periods of time. Where's the hardcore processing in the coconut nectar?

61f9349ad28e3c42d1cec58ba4825a7d

(10490)

on October 28, 2012
at 02:07 PM

Yes, nursling, but when it is bound to the glucose it is processed differently by the body, which is also why sucrose is listed instead of just glucose and fructose alone.

Medium avatar

(310)

on October 28, 2012
at 12:23 PM

It's not like I'm using it every day. Honestly I like the taste much better than agave, which is full of fructose. Agave just tastes gross to me, and this stuff is a little more like maple syrup/honey.

Eed7dabde3d61910685845e04605267f

(2934)

on October 28, 2012
at 09:41 AM

@dmi, what does paleo mean to you out of itnerest?

76211ec5301087de2588cfe3d6bccba9

(1178)

on October 28, 2012
at 02:42 AM

always watch out for low GIs. this means high fructose content.

76211ec5301087de2588cfe3d6bccba9

(1178)

on October 28, 2012
at 02:41 AM

sucrose is half fructose, which means coconut nectar is 35-49% fructose.

1b47e0a6d7984e33e59581d8364cc3dd

(716)

on October 27, 2012
at 05:50 PM

Sounds paleo to me, but who knows :)

Medium avatar

(310)

on October 27, 2012
at 02:24 PM

Pretty much, the only ingredient is organic coconut sap nectar. GI of only 35 too. It's the brand coconut secret.

1b47e0a6d7984e33e59581d8364cc3dd

(716)

on October 27, 2012
at 01:47 PM

What does this coconut nectar contain? Is it nectar from coconut flowers or what?

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2 Answers

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1
61f9349ad28e3c42d1cec58ba4825a7d

(10490)

on October 28, 2012
at 02:21 AM

I think it's a good choice, as far as an added sweetener goes. It's low fructose, which is a big plus! (Not that I'm anti-fructose in the form of whole fruit, but for an added sweetener, I'd rather go lower on that.)

The major component of coconut sugar is sucrose (70-79%) followed by glucose and fructose (3-9%) each. http://www.realrawfood.com/coconut-nectar-and-sugar

Haven't tried it myself, though, along with most coconut stuff.

Medium avatar

(310)

on October 28, 2012
at 12:23 PM

It's not like I'm using it every day. Honestly I like the taste much better than agave, which is full of fructose. Agave just tastes gross to me, and this stuff is a little more like maple syrup/honey.

76211ec5301087de2588cfe3d6bccba9

(1178)

on October 28, 2012
at 02:41 AM

sucrose is half fructose, which means coconut nectar is 35-49% fructose.

61f9349ad28e3c42d1cec58ba4825a7d

(10490)

on October 28, 2012
at 02:07 PM

Yes, nursling, but when it is bound to the glucose it is processed differently by the body, which is also why sucrose is listed instead of just glucose and fructose alone.

0
76211ec5301087de2588cfe3d6bccba9

(1178)

on October 28, 2012
at 02:48 AM

honey or maple syrup would both be more natural, less processed options.

61f9349ad28e3c42d1cec58ba4825a7d

(10490)

on October 28, 2012
at 02:11 PM

Please explain how coconut nectar is so processed. The information I can find, presumably from the manufacturer, is that it is sap from the coconut tree, allowed to dry and thicken at temperatures no higher than an average tropical day so that it is raw. It doesn't say, but maybe it is filtered or something, too. Honey I can see, but maple syrup is flat-out boiled for long periods of time. Where's the hardcore processing in the coconut nectar?

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